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Sustainable Development Program | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Fall 2021

Sustainable Development Minor

Admission Requirements

Interested students must be in good academic standing and receive approval from the REM Academic Advisor to be enrolled in this minor.

Note: Students enrolled in the REM major may enroll in the sustainable development minor.

Program Requirements

Lower Division Requirements

Complete one of

REM 100 - Global Change (3)

This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Pascal Haegeli
TBD
PLAN 100 - Introduction to Planning (3)

Students will be exposed to a broad overview of the field of planning. The course will introduce students to the role of a planner while exploring the practice of planning (human settlements and community planning) in varying contexts within Canada and internationally. Students with credit for PLAN 200 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tammara Soma
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2532, Burnaby
D102 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3220, Burnaby
D103 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2503, Burnaby
D104 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 9655, Burnaby

and

SD 281 - Introduction to Sustainability (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and alternative perspectives around sustainability (e.g. Indigenous, just sustainabilities etc.). Students will also learn from the practical experience of diverse experts and sustainability professionals. Conventional approaches to sustainable development will be critiqued to ensure considerations for equity and social justice. Highlights will be showcased from the Global North and Global South. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tammara Soma
TBD

Upper Division Requirements

Complete all of

SD 381 - Building Sustainable Communities (4)

Engages students in understanding how to plan and cultivate sustainability at the community and city level, taking into consideration the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Explores and analyzes policy instruments, planning tools, and strategies from around the world for engaging people and institutions in building sustainable communities. Prerequisite: One of PLAN 100, REM 100, or SD 281; and 45 units. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Andreanne Doyon
TBD
SD 401 - Sustainable Development Studio (4)

Engages students in creating innovative solutions to real-world challenges of sustainability and development, using studio-based approaches. Explores mechanisms for effective social and environmental change and develops policies and strategies for implementing sustainability in different locations and at different scales. Prerequisite: SD 281; one of SD 381 or SD 481; and 75 units.

SD 481 - Sustainability Governance and Leadership (4)

Engages students in understanding critical concepts and issues of sustainability at different scales and how they related to policy, management, leadership, and governance in a range of context and across different sectors (thinking about how local movements can come to influence national and international governance). Explores and analyzes the history of sustainability action, how change happens, the role of different levels of governance, current sustainability initiatives, and prospects for how to create change in the future. Prerequisite: One of PLAN 100, REM 100, or SD 281; and 60 units. Students with credit for SCD 401 or REM 401 or REM 481 may not complete this course for further credit.

*Students may elect to fulfil the following electives portion of the SD minor by enrolling in one of several alternative term length programs, but the program must address aspects of sustainability and lead to at least nine units (e.g. Civic Innovation Change Lab, Semester in Dialogue, etc.). Students opting for this pathway for their electives should contact the REM Advisor for more information and must obtain approval from the REM Undergraduate Chair before proceeding.

Complete two of*

ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 units.

ARCH 389 - Ethnoecology (3)

Ethnoecology is the study of the relationships between people and their environment. It is motivated by and situated in current issues, such as food security and food sovereignty, ethics, climate change, and cultural loss and reconnection. We will explore these issues through case studies from cultures around the world and directly from ethnoecological researchers. Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 units. Students with credit for ARCH 329 ST-Ethnoecology may not take this course for further credit.

CMNS 346 - Development Communication (4)

An introduction to different ways of thinking about the role that communication plays in development including both historical and contemporary thought. The course will explore the nature and causes of unequal opportunities for economic growth, human security, environmental sustainability and social resilience, focusing on the contributions of the information economy and knowledge society. It provides a workshop for development and communication practices. Prerequisite: 60 units including CMNS 240 or 247, with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CMNS 345 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 We 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
AQ 5018, Burnaby
CMNS 349 - Environment, Media and Communication (4)

An examination of how media, culture and communication shape public opinion and behaviour about environmental issues such as global warming, (un)sustainable resource use and pollution, with special attention to the impact of practices such as advertising, public relations, science and risk communication, journalism and advocacy communication upon public discourse about the environment, and the role of dialogue and deliberation in mediating and resolving conflict over environmental issues. Prerequisite: 45 units, including at least one upper division course in CMNS, DIAL, ENV, EVSC, GEOG or BlSC, with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Svitlana Matviyenko
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 321 - Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

Examines the historical development, spatial organization, and social impact of market function, firm structure and operation, economic policy, and regulation and deregulation at various scales from local to global, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 327 - Geography of Tourism (4)

Factors underlying the changing geography of tourism. Issues of demand, supply and impact are examined. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

GEOG 363 - Urban Planning and Policy (4)

An introduction to the major approaches and key ideas of the professions of urban governance; urban planning and urban policy. Through a focus on contemporary theory, process-based understanding, and specific issues and examples, the course examines key trends and interventions and promotes critical reflection on urban development. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Leanne Roderick
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
D101 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1325, Vancouver
D103 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 1325, Vancouver
GEOG 364 - Cities and Crisis (4)

An examination of urban geographies of crisis, concentrating on what crisis is, what it is used for, how it is differentially experienced, and how it is distributed unevenly. Case studies of environmental, economic, social, and political crises are the main focus. The course concludes by addressing the future(s) of cities. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Students with credit for HIST 377 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christina Adcock
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
or HIST 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 377 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christina Adcock
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary-Claire Collard
Liam Kennedy-Slaney
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
D101 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D103 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D104 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
HSCI 308 - Sickness and Wealth: Health in Global Perspective (3)

New formations of wealth and power that contribute to international health disparities and consideration of the relations of power both between and within nation-states that make some people sick and keep others well. Economic and political collusions that make people sick. Infectious disease and child survival, health implications of war, biotech, and the politics of food and water. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: HSCI 130.

HSCI 340 - Social Determinants of Health (3)

Social determinants of health and health inequities. Explores how and why the social advantages and disadvantages that people experience - based on their social position(s) and social circumstances - determine their health status and overall well-being. Prerequisite: 60 units and two HSCI 200-level courses with a minimum grade of C-, one of which may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicole Berry
Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
HUM 325 - The Humanities and the Natural World (4)

A study of the humanistic, scientific, political, and ideological discourses deriving from concern with the natural environment. Using classic and contemporary sources, this course examines the interaction of humans with the non-human world, and includes such topics as human communities and nature, the immersion of the individual in nature, nature and the human habitat. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

IS 307 - International Ethics: Poverty, Environmental Change, & War (4)

Examines ethical issues of global concern, with a focus on debates about poverty, environmental change, and armed conflict. Introduces students to relevant political and ethical theories, such as cosmopolitanism and nationalism, utilitarianism, theories of human rights, and ethics of care. Assesses various policy responses to these global challenges. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken IS 319 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 David Matijasevich
Th 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1425, Vancouver
IS 358 - Development, Aid and Difference in Historical Perspective (4)

Examines "International Development" within a series of historical frames, including the history of imperialism, the history of international relations, globalization, and the cultural and intellectual history of North-South relations. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have credit for HIST 358 may not take IS 358 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Anushay Malik
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
IS 373 - Global Environmental Politics (4)

Examines international efforts to respond to global environmental challenges, such as climate change, deforestation, and the degradation of the oceans. Investigates obstacles to effective action and possible ways forward. Explores the role of a range of key actors, including states, intergovernmental organizations, multinational companies, NGOs, and social movements. Prerequisite: 45 units.

LBST 311 - Labour and the Environment (3)

The changing relationships between unions and environmental groups; how work in various industries contribute to climate change; and how climate-change policies affect workers in different ways. The consequences of climate policies for different categories of workers, identified by economic sector, geographic location, gender, ethnicity, and Aboriginal status. Prerequisite: 30 units. Strongly Recommended: LBST 101.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver
PLAN 300 - Methods for Planning Analysis (4)

Explores the qualitative and quantitative research methods used by planners in both urban and regional settings. Students will gain a basic understanding of planning relevant data and approaches to analyzing and communicating planning data between and within different communities. The roles of planners, and other participants/actors, in research related to urban and regional planning processes will be introduced. Processes and techniques associated with conducting ethical planning research will also be covered. Prerequisite: PLAN 200.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Mark Seinen
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
POL 342 - Developing Countries in Global Politics (4)

Problems arising from the disparities in power and wealth between the highly industrialized countries of Europe and North America, and the under-industrialized countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 346 - International Organization (4)

An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tyler Chamberlain
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4140, Burnaby
PSYC 366 - Psychology and Environmental Sustainability (3)

A survey of some of the ways that psychological theorizing and research, and social psychology in particular, can be applied to environmental sustainability. Introduces students to some of the environmental challenges faced by contemporary humans and the psychological implications of those challenges. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 260. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Psychology and Environmental Sustainability may not take PSYC 366 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gulnaz Anjum
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
REM 311 - Applied Ecology (3)

Builds on foundational ecological concepts to study the ecological processes that govern the dynamics of populations. Students will use quantitative models to examine the role of data, variability, uncertainty, and assumptions in science and decision making. Students will learn how to improve the sustainable use of natural capital by applying scientific data, ecological theory, ecological models, critical thinking, and Adaptive Management to societal decisions. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215 or REM 211; STAT 201 or STAT 203 or STAT 205 or GEOG 251 or equivalent. Recommended: REM 225. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Harrison
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D101 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
D102 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
D103 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 3148.2, Burnaby
REM 350 - Energy Management for a Sustainable Climate and Society (4)

An interdisciplinary approach to transforming energy systems in pursuit of sustainable climate and society. Perspectives include thermodynamics, resource potentials, technological potentials, economic evaluation, implementation of transformative public policies, political-economy assessment of policy constraints, national and sub-national governance options, behavioural change potentials, global diplomacy, and pursuit of greater equity within and between countries. Prerequisite: 45 units.

REM 355 - Sustainable Transportation Management (3)

Explores trends in the transportation sector according to a resource and environmental management perspective, including air quality and greenhouse gas impacts. The perspective is interdisciplinary, organized around transitions to alternative fuels, efficiency and reduced vehicle use. Skills to be developed include sustainability management, lifecycle analysis and policy analysis. Prerequisite: 45 units or permission of instructor.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jonn Axsen
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2200, Burnaby
D101 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D102 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D103 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
REM 356W - Environmental Policy (3)

Provides an overview of policy and governance approaches used to manage the natural environment at the international, national, provincial, regional, and local levels. Presents a basic set of evaluative questions that can be used to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of different approaches to regulate and manage the environment. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, GEOG 100, GEOG 111, or EVSC 100; and 45 units. Students with credit for REM 356 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andres Cisneros-Montemayor
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D102 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D103 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D104 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
REM 357 - Planning for Sustainable Food Systems (3)

Provides students with the tools to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current food system and will encourage them to critically analyze diverse solutions from both the global South and global North to build a more sustainable food system. Students will work collaboratively with the instructor to examine diverse and interdisciplinary approaches to food sustainability and strengthen their problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken REM 363-3 "Special Topics" in Spring 2019 and Fall 2019 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amanda Watson
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
SA 326 - Food, Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

Modernization narratives have placed food and agriculture on the margins of social thought. The current ecological crisis requires us to take a new look at the global agrifood system and its social, political and ecological relations. This course develops analytical perspectives on contemporary issues concerning food, ecology and agrarian change. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 328 - States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Offers a new perspective on global hegemonic transformations which take different forms in different historical periods, animated by powerful discourses of discipline, opportunity, development and sustainability. Helps students explore alternatives through the examples of multiple forms of sovereignty, global citizenship and democracy. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 430 are not eligible to take this course for further credit.

SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Complete one of*

BUS 453 - Sustainable Innovation (3)

Challenges associated with continuing innovation are examined and students work to generate innovative solutions by challenging existing economic models. Students learn about sustainable opportunity, recognition, and screening, and understand how great ideas to 'save the planet' can get off the ground. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course) with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 338. Students with credit for BUS 494 when offered as Sustainable Innovation may not complete this course for further credit.

BUS 475 - Sustainable Operations (3)

Examines key challenges and opportunities organizations face in integrating sustainable business practices within corporate strategy. Identifies organizational capabilities needed to support existing sustainable commitments and strategies to allow for innovation. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students with credit for BUS 49X Selected Topics (Sustainable Operations) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3150, Burnaby
BUS 489 - Management Practices for Sustainability (3)

Businesses are realigning and in some cases, reinventing their organizations toward more sustainable business models. Management systems and initiatives will be examined that enable organizations to reduce their firms' negative environmental and social impacts while, in many cases, increasing profits and competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and (BUS 381 or BUS 374), all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 457 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3535, Burnaby
ECON 460 - Seminar in Environmental Economics (3)

Focus will vary from term to term. Prerequisite: ECON 302 with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

ENSC 412 - Technologies, Cultures and a Sustainable World (3)

Technology issues relevant to global sustainable development are considered from engineering, historical and anthropological perspectives. Topics include hydroelectric dams, alternative power generation systems, and the science of climate change. In-depth case studies emphasize interdisciplinary exploration of these themes. Students wishing B-Soc credit should take ENV 412. Prerequisite: Minimum 60 units. Students may take only one of ENSC 412 and ENV 412 for credit. Breadth-Science.

GEOG 424 - Cities, Transportation, Infrastructure (4)

An exploration of the relationships between the development of cities, transportation, and infrastructure from an economic geography perspective. Greater Vancouver provides a location to explore, apply, and critique the theoretical perspectives presented in seminar. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 323, 324, 362, or 363.

GEOG 449 - City and Environment (4)

The city as human-natural system; its processes and interactions in urban environmental policy and practice; with attention to historical and theoretical context. Prerequisite: 60 units, or enrolment in a Sustainable Community Development program; and one of GEOG 362, 363, or SCD 301.

HIST 432 - Problems in Environmental History (4)

An investigation into the major themes and arguments in the environmental histories of North America, emphasizing how different individuals and groups have used, perceived, and managed their environments over time. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 432 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 432 may take HIST 432 for credit only when a different topic is taught.

HSCI 403 - Health and the Built Environment (3)

Relationships between the physical environment in which people live and their health and well being. How the built environment affects physical activity, obesity, exposure to pathogens and toxins, health status, mental health, and risk of illness and injury. How urban form, physical infrastructure, and landscape and building design can promote health. Prerequisite: 60 units including HSCI 330 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for HSCI 309 may not complete this course for credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Meghan Winters
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 9011, Burnaby
HSCI 483 - Senior Seminar in Environmental Health (3)

An in-depth overview of environmental health, environmental risks and human activity in relation to environmental health in the context of disease prevention, surveillance and control. Prerequisite: 90 units, including HSCI 204 and HSCI 330, with a minimum grade of C-.

INDG 401 - Aboriginal Peoples and Public Policy (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: INDG (or FNST) 101 and 201W. Recommended: POL 221. Students with credit for FNST 401 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Natahnee Winder
TBD
INDG 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for FNST 433 may not take this course for further credit.

IS 410 - Politics, Institutions and Development (4)

The quality of institutions' exercises a crucial influence on the prospects for development. Aims are to interrogate this claim through analysis of different paths of economic growth and change across the developing world. Examination of the ways in which politics influences economic growth and distribution; the relationships between political systems and patterns of development; and the politics of institutions and state formation. Prerequisite: 90 units.

IS 421 - The Economics of International Organizations and Development (4)

Develops an understanding of the interactions between international organizations, economic theory, and implementation of economic policies. Explores as well the impact of their interventions in some chosen countries. Prerequisite: 45 units.

PLAN 400 - Planning Theory and Policy Analysis (4)

Provides an advanced evaluation of planning theory, public policy and policy analysis, focusing on problems in urban and regional planning and resource and environmental management. Prerequisite: PLAN 200 and 60 units.

PLAN 406 - Rural Planning and Development (4)

Examines the processes and practices of planning in the rural setting. Topics may include the historical development of rural planning in Canada, the principles and practices of rural development and their relevance to planning, planning in resource regions, and planning for rural resilience. For each topic the course will identify the challenges and opportunities associated with adding a rural lens to planning practice. Prerequisite: PLAN 200 and 60 units.

PLAN 407 - Indigenous Governance and Resource Relationships (4)

Explores diverse Indigenous perspectives on governance, resource, land and water management, intergovernmental relations and economic development in the context of contemporary settler colonialism in Canada. Skills include critical thinking, anti-colonial, economic, political and policy analyses. Prerequisite: One of REM 207, ARCH 286, or any INDG course; and 75 units. Students with credit for REM 407 may not take this course for further credit.

or REM 407 - Indigenous Governance and Resource Relationships (4)

Explores diverse Indigenous perspectives on governance, resource, land and water management, intergovernmental relations and economic development in the context of contemporary settler colonialism in Canada. Skills include critical thinking, anti-colonial, economic, political and policy analyses. Prerequisite: One of REM 207, ARCH 286, or any INDG course; and 75 units. Students with credit for PLAN 407 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Clifford Atleo
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
PLAN 408 - Environmental Planning for Sustainable Communities (4)

Examines frameworks, policies and planning approaches to position communities for a sustainable future. Sustainable communities connect citizens, private sector and government to collaborate in balancing human well-being with ecosystem health. Environmental planners need to know how to engage community-level stakeholders to prevent deforestation, reduce carbon emissions, and protect biodiversity while also fostering community health, social equity, and quality of life. Prerequisite: PLAN 200 and 60 units.

POL 452W - Energy Policy (4)

Examines the politics and policies of energy, including historical and technical perspectives. Topics include alternative energy, climate change, regulatory policy, and the economics of energy, as well as practical case studies. Students who have completed POL 459 in 2009 and 2010 may not complete this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 452 - Environmental Education (8)

Examines problems entailed in developing awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and develops an understanding of challenges, opportunities, strategies and possible solutions. Includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: 90 units. Students may be required to complete a Criminal Record Check. Students with credit for EDUC 452 or ENV 452 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

or EDUC 452 - Environmental Education (8)

Examines the educational problems entailed in developing human awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores environmental issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and relates historical and contemporary problems in human-environment interactions to school curricula from the elementary to the secondary level. Includes a laboratory component. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. A field activity fee will be levied in this course. Normally offered in summer term only. Prerequisite: EDUC 401W/402W or Corequisite: EDUC 403. Students may be required to successfully complete a Criminal Record Check. Students with credit for EDUC 454, REM 452, or ENV 452 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

REM 454 - Water Security (4)

Students investigate dimensions of the global environmental crisis related to water security, including: human rights, political science, development economics, gender policies, geopolitics, regional integration and security, international law, national legislation, public health, trade, agriculture, energy generation, and water resources management. Prerequisite: 75 units and REM 100 or EVSC 100 or GEOG 100.

SD 491 - Directed Studies in Sustainable Development (0)

Permits SD students to expand their knowledge base and apply their critical thinking within the field of sustainable development in an area not examined in depth in regular courses. Enrollment is limited. Variable units: 1, 2, 3, 4. Prerequisite: 60 units and permission of the program director. Students with credit for DEVS 403 or SCD 412 may not take this course for further credit.

SD 494 - Project in Sustainable Development (4)

Provides students an opportunity to apply ideas and models acquired in the program to a practical problem in sustainable development. Required for SCD PBD students. Certificate students must apply for special permission to take this course. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of the Sustainable Development Program. Students with credit for SCD 404 may not take this course for further credit.

SD 499 - Special Topics in Sustainable Development (4)

A specific topic within the field of sustainable development, not covered by regularly scheduled, required courses in the program. The subject matter may vary from term to term. Prerequisite: 60 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Students with credit for DEVS 402 or SCD 410 with the same topic may not take this course for further credit.