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Sustainable Energy Engineering Courses

SEE 100 - Engineering Graphics and Software for Design (3)

Introduction to graphical communication in the context of engineering design. Students learn to think and communicate visually. With the use of computer aided design (CAD) tools, students learn the theory and practice of design by dissecting, graphically representing, and redesigning products. Students with credit for ENSC 104, MSE 100, or IAT 106 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 101W - Process, Form and Convention in Professional Genres (3)

Fundamentals of communicating technical information clearly and concisely for professional engineers. A focus on communicating persuasively about various contemporary technical, social, ethical and environmental issues with technical and non-technical audiences. Students will practice providing constructive feedback to peers, giving presentations and working in a team. Students with credit for CMPT 105W, ENSC 102, ENSC 105W, or MSE 101W may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

SEE 110 - Energy, Environment and Society (3)

Energy availability and sources, environmental consequences of energy supply and consumption, and societal impacts. Explores the environmental, economic, social, and political implications of the choices a society makes to meet its energy needs. Definitions of sustainability. Special emphasis on communication skills.

SEE 111 - Integrated Energy Solution I (4)

Introduction to the process of sustainable engineering design. Historical perspective on role of energy, resources and technology in society. Development and demonstration of sustainability thinking through research, case study and design project undertaken by teams of students with integration of socio-economic factors and planning. Course introduces Project Based Learning methods. Prerequisite: SEE 110.

SEE 221 - Statics and Mechanics of Materials (4)

Introduction to solid mechanics including statics, stress, strain, and deformation. Equilibrium conditions, axial loading, torsional loading, pure bending, stresses and deflections in rods and beams. Prerequisite: PHYS 140, MATH 152. Students with credit for ENSC 281, MSE 221, or ENSC 385 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 222 - Engineering Materials for Energy Systems (3)

Introduction to engineering materials by control of their structures to achieve different properties and performance. Techniques for modern materials engineering practice. Covers crystal and non-crystal structures and instruments for structure determination; principles of material failure, polymers, ceramics, nano-materials, and composites; electronic materials, and electro-chemical energy materials; quality control and reliability. Prerequisite: PHYS 140, CHEM 121 or (CHEM 122 and CHEM 126). Students with credit for MSE 220 or ENSC 330 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 224 - Thermodynamics for Energy Engineering (3)

Basic energy concepts and definitions; first and second laws of thermodynamics; ideal and real gases; thermodynamic properties; with emphasis on analysis and applications to energy systems engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 251.

SEE 225 - Fluid Mechanics (4)

The fundamentals of fluid mechanics for engineers, emphasizing the basics of fluid statics and fluid motion, with applications in energy system engineering. Prerequisite: PHYS 140, MATH 251, (MATH 260 or MATH 310). Students with credit for ENSC 283 or MSE 223 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 230 - Electric Circuits (4)

Fundamental elements of electrical circuits; circuits laws; series and parallel circuits; operational amplifiers; network theorems; nodal and mesh methods; analysis of natural and step response of first and second order circuits; real, reactive and rms power. Covers worker safety implications of electricity, and safety of common laboratory practices such as soldering. Prerequisite: PHYS 141, MATH 232. Corequisite: (MATH 260 or MATH 310). Students with credit for ENSC 220 or MSE 250 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 231 - Electronic Devices and Systems (4)

Analysis of the basic electronic components, amplifiers, diodes, semiconductors, transistors and MOSFETs. Introduction to specific instrumentation, including actuators and sensors. Design of electronic circuits based on real world scenarios. Prerequisite: SEE 230. Students with credit for MSE 251 or ENSC 225 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 241 - Measurement, Analysis and Forecasting (3)

An introduction to methods for collecting and analysing engineering data. Topics include engineering data representation, probability density functions, engineering measurements, error analysis, test of hypotheses, regression, and design of experiments. Prerequisite: PHYS 141, MATH 232. Corequisite: MATH 251. Students with credit for ENSC 280, MSE 210, PHYS 231, or STAT 270 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 242 - Computational Methods for Engineers (3)

Apply numerical methods to solve engineering problems with an emphasis on sustainable energy engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 152, MATH 232. Students with credit for MACM 316 or MSE 211 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 251 - Electric Machines and Energy Conversion (3)

Principles, operation, and analysis of electromechanical energy conversion systems and their applications. Prerequisite: SEE 230, SEE 221, (MATH 260 or MATH 310).

SEE 290 - Industrial Internship I (3)

The first of 3 term-long work placements in which students gain real-world experience in research or industrial facilities, often designing and building real products. Students integrate theory and practice as a student engineer. Students are supported to prepare their job search strategies, conduct professional interviews and explore and develop their career goals. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree.

SEE 294 - Special Internship I (3)

An alternative experience to a regular co-op work term. This may include, but is not restricted to, a self-directed project (eg. sustainable community project), service (eg. intern with Engineers Without Borders), entrepreneurial, or research terms. Prior approval of the Internship Coordinator is required. To be granted credit Special Internship I must meet the regular criteria for a co-op work term. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree.

SEE 300 - The Business of Engineering (3)

Economic and entrepreneurial concepts important to engineers who manage projects, run businesses, or need to decide on the most efficient method for accomplishing a task. Topics include: financial accounting and metrics, economic equivalence, rates of return, depreciation, income taxes, project and cost-benefit analyses, capital budgeting, financing methods, risk and uncertainty, business plans. Prerequisite: A minimum of 75 units. Students with credit for ENSC 201, ENSC 311, ENSC 410, ENSC 411, or MSE 300 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 310 - Integrated Energy Solution II (4)

Integrated design methodology for sustainable engineering problems; implementation through an energy system project undertaken in a project based learning environment. Introduction to modelling, simulation and optimization of energy systems. Global and local regulatory and policy frameworks. Demonstration of integrated sustainability thinking through design project, report and presentation. Special emphasis on communication skills. Prerequisite: Completion of one co-op work term; SEE 251, 224, 242.

SEE 324 - Heat and Mass Transfer for Energy Engineering (3)

Introduces the basic principles of heat and mass transfer with analysis and application to real-world sustainable energy systems. Prerequisite: PHYS 141, SEE 224, SEE 225.

SEE 325 - Mechanical Design and Finite Element Analysis (3)

Introduction and application of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to energy systems design problems involving engineering mechanics, heat transfer and machine elements. Includes an introduction to commercial FEA software and applications to practical problems. Concepts relating to engineering mechanics and machine elements are developed in the context of design projects. Prerequisite: SEE 100, SEE 221, SEE 222, SEE 324.

SEE 331 - Power Electronics (4)

Introduction to the fundamentals of power electronic circuits, components, and operation, and principles of electric power conversion in DC and AC applications. Prerequisite: SEE 231. Students with credit for MSE 353 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 332 - Power Systems Analysis and Design (3)

Interconnected power systems including generators, transformers, electric motors and transmission lines; active and reactive power flow; symmetrical components; symmetrical and unsymmetrical short circuit fault calculations; protection systems, circuit breakers, transient stability, and grid voltage and frequency control. Labs, field trips and projects related to power grid operation, control, and design. Prerequisite: SEE 251, SEE 331.

SEE 333 - Network and Communication Systems (3)

Fundamentals of communication networks: reference models, layered architecture. Physical layer analysis and design. Performance analysis of communication protocols at the data link, network, and transport layers. Medium access control, congestion control, routing. Network security, privacy, and social issues. Tools for simulation and analysis of communication networks. Prerequisite: SEE 341.

SEE 341 - Signals and Systems (3)

Modelling and analysis of continuous and discrete signals using linear techniques. Laplace transforms; methods for basic modelling of physical systems; discrete and continuous convolution; impulse and step response; transfer functions and filtering; continuous Fourier transform and its relationship to the Laplace transform; frequency response and Bode plots; sampling; Z-transform. Prerequisite: SEE 242, SEE 230. Students with credit for MSE 280 or ENSC 380 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 342 - Feedback Control Systems (4)

Fundamentals of feedback control system design and analysis, including practical and theoretical aspects. Significant lab component in which students design controllers and evaluate their robustness to modeling errors and nonlinearities. Prerequisite: SEE 341. Students with credit for ENSC 383 or MSE 381 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 351 - Bioprocess Engineering Systems (3)

Combines biotechnology and engineering for materials and energy harvesting from renewable feedstocks. Covers fundamental biomolecular research on proteins, enzymes, microbes, biosensors, bioseparations and bioreactors. Applications in food processing preservation; biofuel; air and wastewater treatment; supramolecular materials for solar energy/photosynthesis; microfluidics for bioreactors; DNA chips; bioenergy; bio fuel cells; pulp/paper. Prerequisite: (MATH 260 or MATH 310), and SEE 224. Corequisite: SEE 324.

SEE 352 - Power Generation and Conversion (3)

Application of thermodynamics, chemistry, and transport physics to energy conversion technologies and systems. Analysis of energy conversion systems with emphasis on efficiency, performance, and environmental impact. Prerequisite: SEE 222, SEE 224, SEE 331.

SEE 354 - Energy Storage (3)

The characteristics, applications, limitations, and environmental impacts of various energy storage technologies and techniques are analyzed, compared and implemented in a lab setting. Electrochemical, mechanical, thermal and emerging energy storage options are considered. Prerequisite: SEE 222, SEE 331, SEE 324.

SEE 390 - Industrial Internship II (3)

The second of 3 term-long work placements in which students gain real-world experience in research or industrial facilities, often designing and building real products. Students integrate theory and practice as a student engineer. Students are supported to prepare their job search strategies, conduct professional interviews and explore and develop their career goals. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: SEE 290 or SEE 294.

SEE 394 - Special Internship II (3)

An alternative experience to a regular co-op work term. This may include, but is not restricted to, a self-directed project (eg. sustainable community project), service (eg. intern with Engineers Without Borders), entrepreneurial, or research terms. Prior approval of the Internship Coordinator is required. To be granted credit Special Internship II must meet the regular criteria for a co-op work term. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: SEE 290 or SEE 294.

SEE 402 - Professional Engineering Ethics and Practice (2)

An introduction to the engineering profession, law and ethics, and the engineers' responsibility to society. Students will explore issues related to worker and public safety and the social implications and environmental impacts of engineering. Includes how to successfully negotiate the transition to the next career stage. Special emphasis on communication skills. Prerequisite: Minimum of 100 units; SEE 110. Students with credit for ENSC 406 or MSE 402 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 410W - Sustainable Energy Design Project I (3)

This is the first course in a team-based, two-course capstone sequence. Focuses on project management, technical writing skills, and teamwork skills and strategies within the context of an engineering design project. Documentation topics cover proposals, functional and design specifications, progress reports and user manuals. An interim project report and presentation is required. SEE 411 must be taken in the term directly following the successful completion of SEE 410W. Grades awarded in SEE 410W are conditional on the successful completion of SEE 411 in the subsequent term. Prerequisite: 100 units; 2 completed co-op terms; SEE 100, SEE 101W, SEE 310. SEE students cannot take MSE 410, MSE 411, ENSC 405W or ENSC 440 for credit. Writing.

SEE 411 - Sustainable Energy Systems Design Project (3)

This is the second course in the team-based, two-course capstone sequence. Students synthesize their learning across the SEE program to research, design, build and test the hardware implementation of a working system. Includes a shop training workshop, engineering standards on how to design for safety, and human factors. A final report and presentation is required. Prerequisite: SEE 410W. Must be taken in the term immediately following 410W. In order to obtain credit, students must successfully complete both SEE 410W and SEE 411. SEE students cannot take MSE 410, MSE 411, ENSC 405W or ENSC 440 for credit.

SEE 460 - Additive Manufacturing and Sustainable Design (3)

Additive manufacturing processes; Design for additive manufacturing; Problem-based additive manufacturing, Project-based additive manufacturing; Light-based 3D printing, Metal 3D printing. Extrusion-based 3D printing; 3D printed electronics; Direct digital manufacturing; 4D printing. Prerequisite: SEE 100, SEE 221, SEE 222.

SEE 461 - Electronics Manufacturing and Assembly (3)

Electronics manufacturing and assembly technologies and processes in the context of sustainability. PCB and interconnect technologies, component selection and handling, material properties and selection, thermal, mechanical and environmental effects, product testing, environmental and legal standards. Prerequisite: SEE 221, SEE 231.

SEE 462 - Manufacturing Processes and Materials (3)

Manufacturing processes and Engineering materials in the context of sustainable manufacturing. Manufacturing technologies and process flow. Productivity and green manufacturing practices. Engineering material selection. Manufacturing processes including forming, separating, fabrication, conditioning and finishing. Prerequisite: SEE 221, SEE 310.

SEE 463 - Embedded Computer Systems (3)

Implementation and design of embedded computer systems used in various real-time applications including energy systems, power electronics, and automation. Prerequisite: CMPT 130, SEE 231.

SEE 490 - Industrial Internship III (3)

The third of 3 term-long work placements in which students gain real-world experience in research or industrial facilities, often designing and building real products. Students integrate theory and practice as a student engineer. Students are supported to prepare their job search strategies, conduct professional interviews and explore and develop their career goals. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: SEE 390 or SEE 394.

SEE 494 - Special Internship III (3)

An alternative experience to a regular co-op work term. This may include, but is not restricted to, a self-directed project (eg. sustainable community project), service (eg. intern with Engineers Without Borders), entrepreneurial, or research terms. Prior approval of the Internship Coordinator is required. To be granted credit Special Internship III must meet the regular criteria for a co-op work term. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: SEE 390 or SEE 394.

SEE 820 - Materials Design for Energy Systems (3)

Modern engineering materials design for energy system applications. Predictive modelling and design implications applied to energy systems. Advanced theoretical and experimental investigations will be discussed to understand the methodologies for design of materials and machinery to be applied to the energy conversion. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897. Recommended: SEE 222.

SEE 821 - Membranes and Filtration (3)

Water usage and global water shortages; principles of membrane separation including microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis; physico-chemical criteria for separations and membrane materials; basic mass transport in mixed solute systems; polarization and fouling; prediction of membrane performance; operational issues, limitations, energy requirements and system configurations. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897. Recommended: SEE 224 and SEE 225.

SEE 850 - Energy Storage Systems (3)

Electrochemical, mechanical and thermal energy storage techniques; integration for stationary and mobile applications; design tradeoffs to understand environmental impacts, cost, reliability, and efficiency. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897. Recommended: SEE 224 and SEE 230.

SEE 890 - PhD Qualifying Exam

PhD Qualifying Exam. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Corequisite: SEE 897.

SEE 891 - Directed Studies (3)

Directed Study in Sustainable Energy Engineering. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897.

SEE 893 - Special Topics I (3)

Special Topics in Sustainable Energy Engineering. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897.

SEE 894 - Special Topics II (3)

Special Topics in Sustainable Energy Engineering. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897.

SEE 895 - Special Topics III (3)

Special Topics in Sustainable Energy Engineering. Corequisite: SEE 896 or SEE 897.

SEE 896 - MASc Research Seminar

Presentation and discussion of research topics and progress in seminar and publication formats. MASc students must enroll in SEE 896 during every term during which they are registered, until all program requirements have been met.

SEE 897 - PhD Research Seminar

Presentation and discussion of research topics and progress in seminar and publication formats. PhD students must enroll in SEE 897 during every term during which they are enrolled, until all program requirements have been met.

SEE 898 - MASc Thesis (18)

MASc Thesis. Corequisite: SEE 896.

SEE 899 - PhD Thesis (18)

PhD Thesis. Prerequisite: SEE 890. Corequisite: SEE 897.