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Sustainable Development Program | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2021

Development and Sustainability Minor

This minor program explores various aspects of global sustainability that arise from the complex relationship between development and the environment, including discussion of practice and policy issues in relation to problem-solving and examination of thematic areas at various scales (local to global) that enhance the quality of life. Themes may include: Global South-Global North relations; environmental justice; biodiversity; food security; sustainable economic development; and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). More information available at www.sfu.ca/susdevprogram.html.

Admission Requirements

Interested students may declare this Minor through the Sustainable Development Program Advisor in the Faculty of Environment. Program entry requires completion of 30 lower division units. Students must also be in good standing in their major program's home department.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete

SD 281 - Sustainable Communities, Sustainable World (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development and of sustainable development. Emphasis on urban areas in the Global North and Global South. Prerequisite: 30 units. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tammara Soma
TBD
D101 TBD

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete

SD 301 - Building a Sustainable World: Concepts and Cases (4)

Exploration of how to cultivate a more sustainable world. Provides a foundation for understanding sustainable development at the global scale. Explores cases of governance, programs and policies in the Global South that foster the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), such as food and water security, biodiversity, inclusive economies, and clean energy. Prerequisite: 45 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 We, Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SD 401 - Sustainable Development Goals Studio (4)

Engages students in creating innovative solutions to real-world challenges of sustainability and development, using studio-based approaches. Explores the Sustainable Development Goals as a mechanism for effective governance in the context of Global North-South relations, and develops policies and strategies for implementing the Goals at local and global scales. Prerequisite: 60 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Recommended: SD 281 or equivalent. Students with credit for DEVS 401 may not take this course for further credit.

and 8 units chosen from the following list of electives:

Archaeology

ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 units.

ARCH 377 - Historical Archaeology (5)

An introduction to theory and method in North American historical archaeology. Laboratory instruction is provided in historic artifact analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or ARCH 201, and one lower division ARCH course.

ARCH 385 - Paleoanthropology (5)

The relationship between culture and biology in prehistoric human evolution. The recognition and critical evaluation of the significance of the similarities and differences among fossil human types. Prerequisite: ARCH 131 and 272/272W.

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
TBD

Communication

CMNS 342 - Science and Public Policy: Risk Communication (4)

The course examines communication in the relation between science (technology) and public policy, and more particularly, in the evaluation of risk. Prerequisite: Two of CMNS 201W (201, 260 or equivalent - BUEC 232, PSYC 210, STAT 100, 201, 203, 205, 270, 285, SA 255), CMNS 202 (or 262), or CMNS 261.

CMNS 346 - Development Communication (4)

An introduction to different ways of thinking about the role that communication plays in development including both historical and contemporary thought. The course will explore the nature and causes of unequal opportunities for economic growth, human security, environmental sustainability and social resilience, focusing on the contributions of the information economy and knowledge society. It provides a workshop for development and communication practices. Prerequisite: 60 units including CMNS 240 or 247. Students with credit for CMNS 345 may not complete this course for further credit.

CMNS 347 - Communication in Conflict and Intervention (4)

The role of communication, and in particular the mass media, in various types of conflict and the uses of communication-based strategies in the intervention, arbitration and mediation of those conflicts. Prerequisite: 60 units including CMNS 110 and 130. Recommended: CMNS 247 and 362.

CMNS 356 - Communication to Mitigate Disasters (4)

An introduction to the special role communication and information systems play in efforts to mitigate effects of major emergencies and disasters. Topics include: Canadian and international disaster management programs, practices and issues; principles of emergency communication planning and operation, and the application and influence of new communication and information technologies (including electronic networks) in hazard information gathering, interpretation, exchange and management. Prerequisite: 60 units, including two of CMNS 230, 240, and 253 (or 253W). Students with credit for CMNS 456 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
CMNS 388 - Special Topics in Communication (4)

Intensive analysis of a particular topic in the general area of communication. This course can be repeated for credit up to a maximum of three times, if topic studied is different. Prerequisite: Depends on topic; published before enrollment.

CMNS 425 - Applied Communication for Social Issues (4)

An advanced seminar in applied communication that focuses on the research and strategic design of media messages, campaigns and programs for public awareness, education, and social change. This course involves the application of theories and approaches in critical media analysis to the tasks of media design and media use for public understanding, engagement and participation around social issues. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 221; and one of CMNS 201W (201 or 260), CMNS 202 (or 262) or CMNS 261.

CMNS 426 - Video Design for Social Communication (4)

This workshop examines the growing role that video is playing in a variety of public relations, industrial, advocacy and educational contexts. The emphasis of this course is on issues of communication design in relation to the goals and values in specific communication forums. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 226 and two of CMNS 220, 326, 358.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
CMNS 444 - Political Economy of International Communication (4)

An examination of the domestic and international implications of the development of mass media and telecommunications and the differential impact of the free flow of technology and information. Prerequisite: 60 units, including CMNS 240 or 247, and CMNS 346 or 348.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Siobhan Watters
Th 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
CMNS 446 - Communication, Science and Technology (4)

Explores the relationship between power, politics, and science; investigates stakeholders such as scientists, entrepreneurs, technologists, activists, policy-makers and their world-wide institutional contexts; compares global flows of science and technology through governmental, non-government, and transnational organizations; examines representations of science and technology in media systems and international development programs. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 346; and one of CMNS 201W (201 or 260), CMNS 202 (or 262) or CMNS 261. Recommended: CMNS 253 (or 253W) and CMNS 362.

CMNS 447 - Negotiation and Dialogue as Communication (4)

This course provides frameworks and tools with which to understand and evaluate negotiation as a form of communication. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the role of communication in the negotiating process, and the consequences of different kinds of negotiation strategies in intercultural, international, competitive, and conflictual situations. It combines theoretical discussion with practical case studies, involves guest negotiators and analysts, and provides an appreciation of the world-wide scale and importance of negotiation as a basis for clarifying relationships. Prerequisite: 75 units, including CMNS 347, and at least one other CMNS or DIAL upper division course.

Economics

ECON 355W - Economic Development (4)

Analysis of theories of economic development. Consideration will be given to the requirements of successful development, to aspects of international co-operation, and to procedures of economic planning. Problems of emerging countries and models of various developing economies will be studied. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 units. Students with credit for ECON 355 or ECON 455 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Chris Bidner
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

Education

EDUC 311 - Foundations in Aboriginal Education, Language, and Culture (3)

An introduction to Aboriginal education in Canada and BC. There will be a critical examination of historical and contemporary issues in education and an exploration of culturally based Aboriginal education grounded in Aboriginal philosophies. Prerequisite: 60 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Carolyn Roberts
Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
EDUC 370 - International and Intercultural Education (4)

Practical and theoretical approaches to international and intercultural education, including examinations of the relationships between culture, learning and schooling, and contemporary issues in teacher education from an international perspective. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 60 units, including 3 units in Education.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Dale McCartney
TBD
EDUC 435 - Infusing Global Perspectives into Curriculum (4)

An examination of the rationale for and concepts of global education including its content, methods and skills objectives, and its place in existing provincial curricula. Prerequisite: 60 units, including three of which must be in Education.

EDUC 441 - Multicultural and Anti-racist Education (4)

Focuses on developing approaches for multicultural and anti-racist teaching. Topics include: diversity of race, language and culture among learners; identifying the operation of racism, prejudice and discrimination in classrooms and schools; becoming familiar with a variety of approaches such as: co-operative learning, culturally appropriate assessment, and community involvement to counteract and prevent negative classroom and school dynamics; identifying bias in curriculum resources; and locating entry points in selected curriculum areas (e.g. language arts, social studies, art, music, etc.) for integrating approaches which employ a range of multicultural/anti-racist curriculum resources. Prerequisite: EDUC 100, or EDUC 230, or EDUC 240, or EDUC 250, or EDUC 401/402 or Corequisite: EDUC 403.

EDUC 452 - Environmental Education (8)

Examines the educational problems entailed in developing human awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores environmental issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and relates historical and contemporary problems in human-environment interactions to school curricula from the elementary to the secondary level. Includes a laboratory component. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. A field activity fee will be levied in this course. Normally offered in summer session only. Prerequisite: EDUC 401W/402W or corequisite EDUC 403. Students may be required to successfully complete a Criminal Record Check. Students with credit for EDUC 454 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

First Nations Studies

INDG 332 - Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations (3)

This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: INDG (or FNST) 101. Students with credit for FNST 332 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
A900 TBD
D100 Robert Bandringa
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D200 Robert Bandringa
Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
INDG 401 - Aboriginal Peoples and Public Policy (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: INDG (or FNST) 101 and 201W. Recommended: POL 221. Students with credit for FNST 401 may not take this course for further credit.

INDG 403 - Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World (3)

This course explores the subject of traditional Indigenous knowledge and its contemporary implications for Indigenous programs in such areas as economic development, ecotourism, spiritualism, language retention, biodiversity, ethnoscience, environmentalism, and heritage conservation. Indigenous perspectives on patents, copyrights, and other creative products from traditional culture will also be examined through lecture, guest speakers and seminar presentation. Prerequisite: INDG (or FNST) 101 or INDG (or FNST) 201W. Students with credit for FNST 403 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Joyce Schneider
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
INDG 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for FNST 433 may not take this course for further credit.

Geography

GEOG 321 - Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

Examines the historical development, spatial organization, and social impact of market function, firm structure and operation, economic policy, and regulation and deregulation at various scales from local to global, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Geoffrey Mann
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 324 - Geography of Transportation (4)

An empirical and theoretical examination of the geographical aspects of transportation systems. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Leanne Roderick
TBD
D101 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 325 - Geographies of Consumption (4)

Spaces, places, landscapes, and scales of consumption emphasizing commodity cultures, marketing, retail, ideology, subjectivity, objects, technology, and tourism. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Kingsbury
TBD
D101 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 327 - Geography of Tourism (4)

Factors underlying the changing geography of tourism. Issues of demand, supply and impact are examined. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Irwin
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

Health Sciences

HSCI 308 - Sickness and Wealth: Health in Global Perspective (3)

New formations of wealth and power that contribute to international health disparities and consideration of the relations of power both between and within nation-states that make some people sick and keep others well. Economic and political collusions that make people sick. Infectious disease and child survival, health implications of war, biotech, and the politics of food and water. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: HSCI 130.

HSCI 340 - Social Determinants of Health (3)

Social determinants of health and health inequities. Explores how and why the social advantages and disadvantages that people experience - based on their social position(s) and social circumstances - determine their health status and overall well-being. Prerequisite: 60 units and two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Maya Gislason
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
HSCI 406 - Global Perspectives in Indigenous Health (3)

Examination of the health and health problems of Indigenous peoples from a global perspective. Comparative study of social and historical factors affecting Indigenous peoples that contribute to health conditions and health status. Efforts of Indigenous peoples to restore health to their Nations. Prerequisite: 60 units and completion of HSCI 305 and either HSCI 340 or HSCI 319W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Chenoa Cassidy-Matthews
Th 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
HSCI 412 - Health Communication (3)

Theory and strategies for health communication in health systems and in particular cultural contexts. Interpersonal communication in health care, the relationship between belief and the construction of clinical realities, and communication for promoting public health. Social marketing and other strategies for health promotion targeting communities and persons of diverse cultural backgrounds. Communication about environmental and health risks. Prerequisite: HSCI 312 and two HSCI 200-level courses. Students with credit for HSCI 301 may not take this course for further credit.

HSCI 431 - The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic (3)

A multidisciplinary and international focus on the transmission, impact, prevention, and human aspects of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. Prerequisite: 60 units including either HSCI 212 or 330.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Hasina Samji
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

History

HIST 322 - Atlantic and Pacific Migration (4)

Topics in the history of Atlantic and Pacific migrations to the Americas with attention given to the contexts from which the migrants came, why they migrated, and how they adjusted. Examples may be taken from the United States, Canada and Latin America. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history.

HIST 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 377 may not take this course for further credit.

HIST 427 - Topics in Indigenous Histories (4)

Examination of selected themes in the history of Aboriginal peoples. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 427 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history.

HIST 432 - Problems in Environmental History (4)

An investigation into the major themes and arguments in the environmental histories of North America, emphasizing how different individuals and groups have used, perceived, and managed their environments over time. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 432 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 432 may take HIST 432 for credit only when a different topic is taught.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Joseph Taylor
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
HIST 458W - Problems in Latin American Regional History (4)

Advanced concepts and methodology applied to the study of one or more Latin American regions. Examples are: pre-Columbian and colonial Middle America; revolutionary Mexico 1910-1970, Brazil from Slavery to Militarism, frontier society to hyper-urbanism in the La Plata countries. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 458W may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: one of HIST 104, 208, 209W. Writing.

HIST 459W - Problems in the Political and Social History of Latin America (4)

Advanced concepts and methodology applied to the study of traditional and contemporary institutions (the church, the great estate, the peasantry, elite structures) and/or political movements (agrarian revolution, populism, the modernizing military). Emphasis placed on changing historiographical interpretations. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 459W may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: one of HIST 104, 208, 209W. Writing.

Humanities

HUM 325 - The Humanities and the Natural World (4)

A study of the humanistic, scientific, political, and ideological discourses deriving from concern with the natural environment. Using classic and contemporary sources, this course examines the interaction of humans with the non-human world, and includes such topics as human communities and nature, the immersion of the individual in nature, nature and the human habitat. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alessandra Capperdoni
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

International Studies

IS 303 - Ethnic Minorities, Identity Politics, and Conflict in Southeast Asia (4)

Surveys the ethnic minorities of Southeast Asia, focusing on their relations with other ethnic groups, especially majority populations, and governments. Examines the treatment of ethnic minorities and the responses of the minorities, including ethnic-based secession movements. Reviews cross-border and broader international issues relating to minorities, such as their status as refugees and cross-border support for insurgencies. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 313W - Nationalism, Democracy and Development in Modern India (4)

An examination of the differing narratives of nation and modernity in the struggle for independence from colonial rule in India, and their implications for the post-colonial state, for politics and for India's economic development. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 210 or 220. Writing.

IS 314 - National, Regional, and International Politics in Southeast Asia (4)

Provides an overview of national and political issues in Southeast Asia. Surveying politics in individual countries and regional political institutions, focus is given to particular themes such as democratization and civil society, communism and other forms of authoritarianism, the role of the military, decentralization, religion and politics, the impact of China on the region, and security concerns. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Logan Masilamani
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
IS 322 - Central Asia: Democracy, Development and Conflicts (4)

Examines the new states of post-Soviet Central Asia, with particular reference to the relationship among democratization, development, autocracy and conflict, and the role of external actors in transnational security issues in the region. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 200. Students with credit for IS 412 may not take this course for further credit.

IS 358 - Development, Aid and Difference in Historical Perspective (4)

Examines "International Development" within a series of historical frames, including the history of imperialism, the history of international relations, globalization, and the cultural and intellectual history of North-South relations. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have credit for HIST 358 may not take IS 358 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amyn Sajoo
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
IS 409 - Special Topics I (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Logan Masilamani
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D400 Megan MacKenzie
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
IS 410 - Politics, Institutions and Development (4)

The quality of institutions' exercises a crucial influence on the prospects for development. Aims are to interrogate this claim through analysis of different paths of economic growth and change across the developing world. Examination of the ways in which politics influences economic growth and distribution; the relationships between political systems and patterns of development; and the politics of institutions and state formation. Prerequisite: 90 units.

IS 419 - Special Topics II (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 429 - Special Topics III (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 421 - The Economics of International Organizations and Development (4)

Develops an understanding of the interactions between international organizations, economic theory, and implementation of economic policies. Explores as well the impact of their interventions in some chosen countries. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 435 - Special Topics in Latin American Studies (4)

An examination of Latin America through historical, literary, and social scientific approaches. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 209W or HIST 209W.

Political Science

POL 342 - Developing Countries in Global Politics (4)

Problems arising from the disparities in power and wealth between the highly industrialized countries of Europe and North America, and the under-industrialized countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 343 - Global Political Economy (4)

An introduction to the study of the international political economy, with an emphasis on the interaction between the state and markets, and the basic political-institutional relationships of trade, money and finance, international investment, foreign debt and foreign aid. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 346 - International Organization (4)

An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 James Busumtwi-sam
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
POL 373 - Human Security (4)

Explores what is involved in shifting the focus in the security realm from 'national interest' to the safety and needs of humans. Addresses several contemporary issues of human insecurity such as genocide, terrorism, civil wars and other complex emergencies; the political economy of conflict (small arms, "blood" diamonds); 'new' inequalities (economic, gender, class, ethnicity); and new health risks (e.g. HIV/AIDS, SARS, ecological degradation). Considers recent initiatives and trends that have emerged to deal with these issues (e.g. humanitarian intervention, International Criminal Court, new coalitions of state and non-state actors such as the Ottawa Process on anti-personnel mines). Prerequisite: Six lower division units in Political Science or permission of the department. Students with credit for POL 349 'Special Topics' for credit under this title may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kanya Adam
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
POL 374 - Africa in the Global Political Economy (4)

Considers Africa in the historical development of the modern global political economy, from the transatlantic slave trade to the present. Examines contemporary issues associated with Africa in the neo-liberal world order and the politics of resistance and alternative pathways or models of development. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 446W - International Relations in East Asia (4)

An overview and analysis of international relations in East Asia. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tsuyoshi Kawasaki
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
POL 447 - Theories of Global Political Economy (4)

An examination of the major theories of international political economy, and their application to such issues as the politics of trade, aid, monetary relations, and transnational corporations. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

Resource and Environmental Management

REM 311 - Applied Ecology (3)

Builds on foundational ecological concepts to study the ecological processes that govern the dynamics of populations. Students will use quantitative models to examine the role of data, variability, uncertainty, and assumptions in science and decision making. Students will learn how to improve the sustainable use of natural capital by applying scientific data, ecological theory, ecological models, critical thinking, and Adaptive Management to societal decisions. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215 or REM 211; STAT 201 or STAT 203 or STAT 205 or GEOG 251 or equivalent. Recommended: REM 225. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Harrison
TBD
D101 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REM 350 - Sustainable Energy and Materials Management (4)

Takes an interdisciplinary approach to sustainable management of society's energy and materials flows. Topics range from thermodynamics and estimates of global resources to market-based policies and governance Institutions. Peak oil, renewable energy and carbon capture and storage are also discussed. The role for green consumerism in light of climate challenge are highlighted. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Jaccard
TBD
D101 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REM 356 - Environmental Policy (3)

Provides an overview of policy and governance approaches used to manage the natural environment at the international, national, provincial, regional, and local levels. Presents a basic set of evaluative questions that can be used to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of different approaches to regulate and manage the environment. Prerequisite: REM 100. Students with credit for REM 356W may not take this course for further credit.

REM 370 - Global Resource Issues in Oceanography (4)

Introduces principles of oceanography, including ocean circulation, ocean carbon cycling, nutrients and biological productivity, oceans and the climate system, and ocean resource contributions to global food supply. Provides basic understanding of ocean resource management including transportation, recreation, fisheries, and mining. Prerequisite: EVSC 100, or GEOG 111, or REM 100, and 45 units. Students with credit for MASC 435 may not take this course for further credit.

REM 445 - Environmental Risk Assessment (4)

Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157; STAT 201 or 203 or 205 or GEOG 251 or equivalent; and 60 units.

REM 454 - Water Security (4)

Students investigate dimensions of the global environmental crisis related to water security, including: human rights, political science, development economics, gender policies, geopolitics, regional integration and security, international law, national legislation, public health, trade, agriculture, energy generation, and water resources management. Prerequisite: 75 units and REM 100 or EVSC 100 or GEOG 100.

Sociology and Anthropology

SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amanda Watson
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 TBD
J100 Agnes MacDonald
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 316 - Tourism and Social Policy (S) (4)

An examination of tourism from the perspectives of sociology and anthropology, focusing primarily upon the social and cultural impacts of tourism and the social policy implications of tourism development in different societies. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201w.

SA 326 - Food, Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

Modernization narratives have placed food and agriculture on the margins of social thought. The current ecological crisis requires us to take a new look at the global agrifood system and its social, political and ecological relations. This course develops analytical perspectives on contemporary issues concerning food, ecology and agrarian change. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Yildiz Atasoy
Mo 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 328 - States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Offers a new perspective on global hegemonic transformations which take different forms in different historical periods, animated by powerful discourses of discipline, opportunity, development and sustainability. Helps students explore alternatives through the examples of multiple forms of sovereignty, global citizenship and democracy. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 430 are not eligible to take this course for further credit.

SA 329 - Sex, Work, and International Capital (SA) (4)

Provides new insights into global gender regimes from a historical-comparative perspective of North-South relations. Stimulates a discussion on the meaning of development and women's work through a theoretical and thematic exploration of issues which may seem specifically based in the global South but are commonly shared throughout the world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W. Students with credit for SA 429 are not eligible to take this course for further credit.

SA 363 - Process of Development and Underdevelopment (S) (4)

An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. The nature and consequences of world system linkages; colonialism and decolonization; patterns of social change in selected societies and regions. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SA 396 - Selected Regional Areas (SA) (4)

An examination of selected aspects of social structure, culture and processes of social change in a specific regional area. The focus will vary from term to term. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Sustainable Development

SD 381 - Building Sustainable Communities: Concepts and Cases (4)

Engages students in understanding how to plan and cultivate sustainability at the community and city level, taking into consideration the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Explores and analyzes policy instruments, planning tools, and strategies from around the world for engaging people and institutions in building sustainable communities. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Andreanne Doyon
TBD
SD 481 - Sustainable Communities Leadership Lab (4)

Students develop the skills to lead change toward sustainability at the community level. Starting with a process of analyzing a particular social or environmental challenge, and using a collaborative approach, they develop a promising idea into a feasible plan for a project or social enterprise. Prerequisite: 60 units and SD 281 or REM 281 or SD 201 or DEVS 201 or SCD 201 or REM 201 or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Students with credit for SCD 401 or REM 401 or REM 481 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Tu, Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SD 499 - Special Topics in Sustainable Development (4)

A specific topic within the field of sustainable development, not covered by regularly scheduled, required courses in the program. The subject matter may vary from term to term. Prerequisite: 60 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Students with credit for DEVS 402 or SCD 410 with the same topic may not take this course for further credit.