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Labour Studies Program | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2021

Labour Studies Minor

The minor in Labour Studies offers a comprehensive approach to labour, working people and labour movements in Canada and internationally.

Admission Requirements

Students may declare this plan upon successful completion of one Labour Studies course and upon application to the Undergraduate Advisor in the Labour Studies Program.

Program Requirements

Students complete 24 units comprised of the following.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete nine lower division units including

LBST 101 - Introducing Labour Studies (3)

Introduction to key concepts necessary for understanding the character and organization of work in contemporary society. The discussion of such issues as how our society decides who works, what the work will be, and under what conditions people work, will be situated in the context of current debates, trends and issues. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Evelyn Encalada Grez
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
LBST 201 - Workers in the Global Economy: Globalization, Labour and Uneven Development (3) **

Explores how people experience paid and unpaid work in the global economy. Focuses on processes such as migration and economic structuring, and applies critical development studies and critical geopolitics to study labour and employment. Explores links between capitalism, urbanization and labour struggles. Examines labour internationalism and global labour rights. Prerequisite: Strongly Recommended: LBST 101. Students with credit for LBST 230 under the title "Workers and Global Capitalism" or "Work and Employment in a Globalized World" and IS 221 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Anushay Malik
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

and the remaining three units chosen from the following.

ECON 102 - The World Economy (3)

An overview of the broad economic trends in the development of the world economy over the last five decades with reference to the major debates related to economic interdependence, development and growth, globalization, and the role of the major multilateral economic institutions (IMF, World Bank, OCED, ILO, UN). (lecture/tutorial). Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Vigie
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
ECON 105 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4)

The principal elements of theory concerning money and income, distribution, social accounts, public finance, international trade, comparative systems, and development and growth. Students with credit for ECON 205 cannot take ECON 105 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Vasyl Golovetskyy
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D115 Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D117 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D200 Yaser Sattari
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D201 TBD
D202 TBD
D204 TBD
D205 TBD
D207 TBD
D208 TBD
D211 TBD
D213 TBD
D214 TBD
D300 Gorkem Ozdemir
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D301 TBD
D302 TBD
D303 TBD
D304 TBD
D305 TBD
D306 TBD
D307 TBD
D308 TBD
D309 TBD
D310 TBD
D311 TBD
D312 TBD
D313 TBD
D314 TBD
ECON 280 - Introduction to Labor Economics (3)

Basic analysis of the labor market and the industrial relations system with emphasis on the major issues of public policy in Canada. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205. Students who have taken COMM 280, ECON 301, 305 or 381 may not take ECON 280 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jane Friesen
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 TBD
D102 TBD
D103 TBD
D104 TBD
D105 TBD
D106 TBD
D108 TBD
GEOG 221 - Economic Worlds (3)

The fundamentals of economics geography, the study of the forces that shape the arrangement of economic activity in the real world. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
GEOG 241 - People, Place, Society (3)

An introduction to key concepts and contexts in contemporary geographical approaches to social practices, meanings, and struggles. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Margaret Ramirez
TBD
D101 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GSWS 102 - Feminist Action (3)

An historical and comparative survey of feminisms and feminist activism in Western European, North American, and Global communities. Students who have completed WS 102 may not take GSWS 102 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

GSWS 201 - Colonizing Women: Canadian Women in Historical Perspective, 1600-1870s (3)

Examines the lives of Canadian women in the colonial context, including the role of women in European-Aboriginal relations, the founding of New France, and settlement in British North America. Themes such as sexuality, race, work, religion and politics will be explored through the study of primary documents and historical literature. Students who have taken WS 201 under the title Women in Canada, 1600-1920 may not take this course for further credit.

HIST 204 - The Social History of Canada (3)

A survey of major themes in Canadian social history from the arrival of Europeans to the present day. Particular attention will be paid to the effects of gender, race and class on the experience of Canadians over time. Prerequisite: Recommended: HIST 101 and 102W. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Cody Groat
TBD
D101 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
LBST 202 - Labour Research for Social Change: Methods and Approaches (3)

Introduces students to labour research through methodology and research methods for social change. By exploring what methodology is, the methods common in labour research, and understandings of social justice, students gain experience of quantitative and qualitative approaches, including survey research. Focuses on using and interpreting quantitative data and statistics for social justice and social change. Prerequisite: LBST 101 or with permission of instructor. Quantitative.

LBST 230 - Special Topics in Labour Studies (3) *

A seminar devoted to the in-depth examination of a topic in Labour Studies not regularly offered by the Program. The course may be repeated for credit when different topics are offered. Prerequisite: Strongly Recommended: LBST 101.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
POL 100 - Introduction to Politics and Government (3)

A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. The course will explore the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. POL 101W is the Writing certified version of POL 100 and students cannot receive credit for both courses. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sanjay Jeram
TBD
D101 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D111 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D112 Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D113 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D114 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D115 Th 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
J100 Cara Camcastle
Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
or POL 101W - Introduction to Politics and Government (3)

A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. Explores the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. This course is identical to POL 100 and students may not take both courses for credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

POL 201 - Introductory Quantitative Methods in Political Science (4)

Introduces quantitative research techniques in political science. Introduces important analytical and conceptual skills necessary to understand and evaluate quantitative political science research. Corequisite: POL 200W or permission of department. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Pickup
Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

Explores how sociologists study, describe, and explain social life. Introduces the sociological perspective and applies it to fundamental social process and everyday issues. As we consider phenomena ranging from interactions among individuals to societal and global inequalities, students critically examine social issues to build their understanding of the world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Maureen Kihika
Mo 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D111 Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D112 Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D113 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D114 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D115 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D116 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D117 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D118 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
J100 Agnes MacDonald
Th 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 200W - Power, Conflict and Change in Canadian Society (SA) (4)

Examines Canadian society from the perspective of the social sciences. Students apply sociological and anthropological concepts to analyze issues in modern societies, focusing on Canada as a case. Topics include class structure, the nature of Canada's population, regional variation, gender relations, multiculturalism, and colonialism. Students with credit for SA 100W are not eligible to take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Amanda Watson
TBD
SA 255 - Introduction to Social Research (SA) (4)

Explores how sociologists and anthropologists investigate social relations and contexts. Students learn to develop research questions and turn them into research projects. Introduces data collection techniques and related ethical issues, the relationship between theory and research, and other fundamental concepts and issues involved in conducting qualitative and quantitative research. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jelena Golubovic
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
STAT 203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)

Descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units including a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 220, POL 200, or equivalent. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 203 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Pai
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD

* Students may take more than one offering of LBST Selected Topics courses for credit and towards the minor, as long as the topic for each offering is different.

** Students with credit for LBST 230 under the title "Workers and Global Capitalism" or "Work and Employment in a Globalized World" may not take this course for further credit.

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete 15 upper division units including

LBST 301W - Labour Movements: Issues, Images and Popular Culture (3)

Provides a comprehensive understanding of the contemporary structure, issues, and perceptions of labour unions and other forms of working-class organization and social movements. The treatment of labour in the media and popular culture will provide an understanding of how labour is viewed in society, how labour views itself, and how working-class culture informs and is informed by the larger culture. Prerequisite: LBST 101 or on permission of instructor. Students with credit for LBST 301 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John-Henry Harter
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

and at least nine units in additional upper division LBST courses.

The remaining three units must be chosen from additional upper division LBST courses* or from the following courses (please note that non-LBST courses may have prerequisites and course enrolment reserves):

ECON 325 - Industrial Organization (3)

Introduces students to the economics of imperfect competition. Topics covered include the theory of the firm, market structure, and various aspects of firm strategy such as pricing, advertising, product differentiation, and innovation. Related questions of public policy will also be addressed. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301; 60 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christoph Luelfesmann
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
ECON 342 - International Trade (3)

Topics discussed in this course are: gains from trade in a classical world; the modern theory of international trade; factor price equalization; empirical tests and extensions of the pure theory model; economic growth and international trade; the nature and effects of protection; motives and welfare effects of factor movements; multinational enterprises; the brain drain; customs union theory; pollution control and international trade. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200 and 105 or 205; 60 units or permission of the department. Students with credit for ECON 442 cannot take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephen Easton
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
ECON 381 - Labor Economics (3)

Analysis of the economics of the labor market with particular emphasis on wage determination, the concept of full employment, and manpower policies. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301; 60 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jane Friesen
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 TBD
D102 TBD
D103 TBD
D104 TBD
D105 TBD
D106 TBD
D107 TBD
D108 TBD
ECON 426W - Industrial Organization: Governance and Institutions (3)

A study of how markets, firms and other institutions are organized using information and transaction cost theories. Topics covered may include: theories of the firm (governance, structure, ownership, signaling and screening behavior); theories of non-market institutions (marriage, non-profit organizations, governments); institutional theories of growth and economic history; and the organization of markets (reputations, contracts, vertical control). Emphasis will be given to covering a limited number of issues and theoretical perspectives in detail rather than attempting a broad survey of new institutional economics. Prerequisite: ECON 302. Students with credit for ECON 426 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Greg Dow
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
ECON 480 - Seminar in the Economics of Labor Market Policy (3)

Seminar focusing on public policy as it relates to employment and income security. Special emphasis will vary from term to term, but may include such topics as examinations of current manpower, welfare and public insurance programs, labor legislation, and private institutional practices (such as union-management pension arrangements) that may affect income security. Prerequisite: ECON (or BUEC) 333.

GSWS 308 - Gendering Economy: Paid and Unpaid Labour (4)

Explores the nature and conditions of all genders' paid and unpaid labour in the economy as well as various theories which explain labour market discrimination, the impact of national public policies on all genders' labour and the transnational interconnections that affect gendered paid and unpaid labour. Prerequisite: 30 units including three units in GSWS or WS or GDST. Students who have taken SA 335 or WS 310 under the title Women and Work may not take this course for further credit.

GSWS 312 - Immigrants, Women and Transnational Migration (4)

Examines the global division of labor where migrant women as well as immigrant women tend to be exploited in numerous forms, ranging from lack of citizenship rights and erosion of skills to the risk of sexual assault, due to immigration/migration and social policies of various countries. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for WS 320 Special Topics: Immigrant Women and Economic Security may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 May Farrales
Tu, Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GSWS 317 - Bread Riots to Riot Grrls: Gender, Resistance and Protest in Historical Perspective (4)

An examination of social protest from a historical perspective. Analyzes the relationships between race, class, gender, sexuality and religion within the formation of social movements. Focuses mainly on the North American context. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for GSWS 301 (or WS 301) with the same title may not take this course for further credit.

GSWS 322 - Feminist Approaches to Research (4)

Explores a variety of feminist research methods including the definition of feminist research, the quantitative/qualitative controversy, action research, participant observation, survey, ethnography, case study, oral history, transnational study, interviews and research ethics. Prerequisite: 30 units, including three units in GSWS or WS or GDST. Students who have taken WS 208 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tiffany Muller Myrdahl
Tu, Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
HIST 327 - Canadian Labor and Working Class History (4)

An examination of the history of labor, primarily in English Canada, during the 19th and 20th centuries. The evolution of trade unions and labor-political movements will be examined together with the impact of industrialization, the rise of mass production, changing patterns of immigration and other contexts of working-class culture and material life. Special attention will be paid to British Columbia as a case study. Historically the course examines 'working class history' as a particular way of studying the past. What is the concept of 'the working class'? Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 101, 102W and 204.

HIST 428 - Problems in the Social and Economic History of Canada (4) **

Selected problems in the history of Canadian agriculture and industrial development, migration and settlement, labor, native policy and class structure. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 428 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 101, 102W.

HIST 463W - Rebellion and Revolution: Topics in the Theory and Practice of Resistance (4)

Explores ideas, people, and movements of social criticism and social justice, stressing history as a way to understand and engage the present. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 463W may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Students with credit for HIST 412 or HIST 412W cannot take HIST 463W for further credit when offered with the course topic "Marxism.". Writing.

HSCI 404 - Public Policy and Health Systems (3)

Major public policy issues affecting Canadian and international health care systems. How the public policy process affects financing, delivery, and regulation of health programs and services. Theories of policy development in the health sector. Evaluation of the extent to which evidence influences policy decisions. Controversies, including: finance, regulatory issue, system restructuring, models of governance, public vs. private service delivery and resource allocation. Prerequisite: 60 units including one HSCI course.

POL 343 - Global Political Economy (4)

An introduction to the study of the international political economy, with an emphasis on the interaction between the state and markets, and the basic political-institutional relationships of trade, money and finance, international investment, foreign debt and foreign aid. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 350 - Public Policy for Women (4)

Examines issues where ideas about males and females either explicitly or implicitly influence policy makers. Focuses on current public policies and their relationship to women on topics such as sexuality and violence, economic security, race and inequality, and climate change. Prerequisite: 30 units. Students who have taken this topic under GSWS 320 (or WS 320) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Laurel Weldon
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amanda Watson
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 TBD
J100 Agnes MacDonald
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 304 - Social Control (S) (4)

This course examines how the organization of control (formal and informal) affects both individuals and society. It will investigate how control takes form, how it functions, the ideologies supporting it, and the resistance it produces. We will ask the following questions: who are the agents of social control; who or what do they control; and how do they control? Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Agnes MacDonald
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 TBD
SA 321 - Social Movements (S) (4)

A study of the sources, development and effects of social movements in transitional and modernized societies. Specific types of movements will be analysed. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Ataman Avdan
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 325 - Political Sociology (S) (4)

An examination of the relations of power and authority. This course will analyze the interrelations of family, church, class, interest groups, etc., particularly as they influence and are influenced by the state. The relations of law and ideology to the structures of government will form the context for this analysis. The course may also focus on broad theoretical questions of contemporary political interest. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 May Hen-Smith
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 340 - Social Issues and Social Policy Analysis (SA) (4)

How do environmental challenges, the contradictions of capitalism, and histories of violence shape contemporary life? How do social issues affect our identities, communities, and sense of belonging? Students learn how to wield sociological and anthropological concepts and theories through clear and analytical communication and writing. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lindsey Freeman
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 TBD
SA 351 - Classical Marxist Thought (S) (4)

A detailed study of classical Marxist social thought. Prerequisite: SA 250.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gary Teeple
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
SA 355 - Quantitative Methods (S) (4)

Examines the methods, concepts and statistical procedures central to quantitative sociological research. Emphasizing the meaningful application of statistical analysis to social issues, the course provides intermediate quantitative research skills. Students use statistics software to conduct applicable statistical analyses and interpret results. Prerequisite: SA 255 and SA 257. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Suzanna Crage
TBD
SA 362 - Society and the Changing Global Division of Labour (S) (4)

An examination of the social and political implications of the global economy. Topics to be considered include the influence of neo-liberal economics, the decline of the national welfare state, transnational political agencies and public policy, the internationalization of culture, the global labour market, the 'world city' hypothesis, ethnic resurgence and alternatives to these developments. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

*Students may take more than one offering of LBST Selected Topics courses for credit and towards the minor, as long as the topic for each offering is different.

** When the topic is appropriate.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and minimum CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0 across all units attempted in each subject that is a major, a joint major, a minor, or an extended minor. FASS Departments may define specific requirements for their respective programs.

For students in other Faculties, please check your Faculty's overall degree requirements: https://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/faculties-research.html

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.