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Department of Humanities | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2021

Hellenic Studies

Certificate

The certificate, which requires the completion of 19 units, including at least ONE upper division course, is for those with an interest in Hellenic studies and students with an interest in pursuing Greek history at the graduate level. The latter should complete at least two language courses. Special topics courses may be completed in place of those below with advisor approval.

Grade Requirement

A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 or a C average is required for all courses applied to the certificate.

Program Requirements

Students must complete 19 units, including one upper division course chosen from the following.

Lower Division Courses

GRK 191 - Modern Greek for Beginners Level I (3)

Basic online introduction to the Greek language for students with no prior experience in studying it. Introduces basic grammar and students will develop their ability to interact in basic communicative events. Writing, speaking, and the cultural context of the language are also covered. Students with credit for GRK 110 or LANG 110 may not take this course for further credit.

GRK 192 - Modern Greek for Beginners Level II (3)

Basic introduction to the Greek language for students who have developed the necessary foundations from GRK 191. Continues to introduce basic grammar and students will develop their ability to interact in basic communicative events. Writing, speaking, and the cultural context of the language are also covered. Prerequisite: GRK 191 or equivalent. Students with credit for GRK 160 or LANG 160 may not take this course for further credit.

GRK 291 - Modern Greek Intermediate Level I (3)

This course will continue developing students’ Greek language skills so that they can communicate in situations that extend beyond the basic level. The course will cover various intermediate-level grammatical structures, including the mediopassive voice for verbs, irregular classes of nouns, and the structure of subordinate sentences. Students will also receive training in speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: GRK 192 or equivalent. Students with credit for GRK 210 or LANG 210 may not take this course for further credit.

GRK 292 - Modern Greek Intermediate Level II (3)

This course will build on the Greek language skills acquired from GRK 291. Students will receive extensive training in speaking, reading and writing. There is no textbook. Other than this course introduction, all the materials students need for learning the basics of Greek are available through the online platform Odysseas. Prerequisite: GRK 291 or equivalent. Students with credit for GRK 260 or LANG 260 may not take this course for further credit.

HUM 102W - Classical Mythology (3)

An introduction to the central myths of the Greeks and Romans. The course will investigate the nature, function, and meaning of myths in the classical world and their considerable influence on western civilization. Students with credit for HUM 102 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
HUM 110 - The Greek World (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the Greek culture in different periods. Using various sources and materials the course explores continuities and ruptures, evolutions and revolutions, and the impact such issues have on the imagination of people today. Students with credit for HS 100 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 150 - Warfare in the Hellenic World: From Plato to NATO (3)

From the days of Achilles to the Second World War, warfare has changed the Greek experience. Examines the evolution of warfare, from Ancient Greece to modem Europe, considering the interplay of violence, technology, ideology, and society. Students with credit for HS 150 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D900 James Horncastle
TBD
HUM 151 - Ancient Greek I (3)

An introduction to the classical Greek language.

HUM 209 - Heroic Greek Tales: From the Trojans to Frankenstein (3)

Examines the origins and traits of heroic identity from ancient Greek plays and Homeric poetry to contemporary culture. Explores the continuities/discontinuities of these archetypes and their impact on cultural/national identities in different contexts and periods. Students with credit for HS 209 or HUM 360 or HS 307 under the title "Heroic Individuals and their Tales" may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 220 - Rome: From Republic to Empire (3)

Examines the history of Rome from its foundation on River Tiber to its conquest of the Mediterranean World. From Kingly rule to the aristocratic Republic with its "mixed" constitution, it reaches a period of civil war amongst aristocratic warlords and Rome's transformation into a monarchy under Augustus. Prerequisite: 30 units. Students with credit for HS 201 may not take this course for further credit.

HUM 226 - War and Society (3)

Examines scholarly approaches to defining war. Here, we investigate the role of organized violence in society, partake in debates on violence and human nature, study the evolution of warfare through technological innovations and cultural change, and consider the complex relationships between war, culture, and society. Prerequisite: One 100 level course at college or university level. Students with credit for HS 216 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 231 - Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome (3)

Examines the social history of ancient Greece and Rome, particularly through the study of relevant artifacts, art, architecture, and ancient texts (in translation). Considers topics such as the lives of men, women, children and slaves; the home; dining; government; the economy; the army; death and burial; and entertainment. Students with credit for HS 231 or HUM 216 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 232 - The Religions of Ancient Greece and Rome (3)

Introduces the religions of ancient Greece and Rome. Archaeological materials, ancient texts (in translation) and art are used to examine Graeco-Roman religions within their historical framework and understand how ancient peoples experienced religion. Examines the extent to which specific social, political and cultural developments impacted the religious landscape. Students with credit for HS 232 or HUM 216 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 275 - From Alexander to the Caesars: The Hellenic and Roman Worlds to the End of Antiquity (3) *

This is an overview of Near Eastern and Mediterranean history from Alexander the Great and the Roman Empire to early Byzantium and the side of Islam that covers the Hellenistic, Roman, and early Byzantine Worlds with emphasis on the place of Hellenism in social, political, religious, and cultural life at the time. Students with credit for HIST 308, HS 308, HIST 275 or HS 275 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 276 - Social, Economic, and Political History of the Mediterranean (3) *

Examines the history of the Mediterranean region that for millennia has been a focal point of human exchange as well as conflict. Considers the entire period from antiquity to the modern world. Students with credit for HIST 276 or HS 276 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 277 - History of Greek Civilization (3) *

Surveys the history of Greek civilization from Mycenaean Greece to the twentieth century. Students who have taken HIST 307 under this topic or HIST 277 or HS 277 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Aleksandar Jovanovic
TBD
HUM 278 - The Greeks in the Ottoman Empire (3) *

Explores the lives of Greeks under Ottoman rule and how the Ottoman systems of administration and taxation, as well as culture and religion, affected and influenced them. Examines how they maintained a Hellenic identity and how this identity contributed to their struggle for independence. Students with credit for HIST 278 or HS 278 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 279 - Greece in the 20th Century (3) *

Examines the political and socio-economic evolution of 20th century Greece in tandem with the cultural transformation of the country from an agrarian based society to the urban dominated structure that characterizes Greece today. Students with credit for HIST 279 or HS 279 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 280 - War in the Balkans and the Making of the 21st Century (3) **

Provides an overview of the second World War as a backdrop to the dramatic changes in Greece and South Eastern Europe. Students with credit for HS 280 or IS 280 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Upper Division Courses

Students must complete at least one course from the following

ARCH 312 - Greek Art and Archaeology (4)

Introduces the major Greek archaeological sites from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period through a chronological and historical survey of Greek art and architecture. Examines the ways in which ancient Greeks used and interacted with their material remains and how they relate to their social, cultural, religious, and political practices and institutions. Prerequisite: One of the following courses: ARCH 100, ARCH 101, ARCH 201, HS 100, HS 231, HS 232, HS 277, HIST 277 or by permission of the instructor. Students with credit for HS 312 cannot take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ARCH 321 under the title "Select Regions in World Archaeology I: Greece" may not take this course for further credit.

or HUM 314 - Greek Art and Archaeology (4)

Introduces the major Greek archaeological sites from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period through a chronological and historical survey of Greek art and architecture. Examines the ways in which ancient Greeks used and interacted with their material remains and how they relate to their social, cultural, religious, and political practices and institutions. Prerequisite: One of the following courses: ARCH 100, ARCH 201, HS 100, HS 231, HS 232, HS 277, HIST 277 or by permission of the instructor. Students with credit for HS 312 or ARCH 312 cannot take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ARCH 321 under the title "Select Regions in World Archaeology I: Greece" may not take this course for further credit.

ARCH 313 - Roman Art and Archaeology (4)

Introduces the art and archaeology of ancient Rome from 8th c. BCE to 4th c. CE through an overview of the material remains in their original historical, political and cultural contexts. Addresses several issues: stylistic changes and innovations, art as a vehicle of propaganda and art as projection of Roman imperial power. Prerequisite: One of the following courses: ARCH 100, ARCH 201, HS 100, HS 231, HS 232, HS/HIST 277 or by permission of the instructor. Students with credit for HS 313 cannot take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ARCH 332 under the title "Special Topics in Archaeology I: Roman Art and Archaeology" may not take this course for further credit.

or HUM 313 - Roman Art and Archaeology (4)

Introduces the art and archaeology of ancient Rome from 8th c. BCE to 4th c. CE through an overview of the material remains in their original historical, political and cultural contexts. Addresses several issues: stylistic changes and innovations, art as a vehicle of propaganda and art as projection of Roman imperial power. Prerequisite: One of the following courses: ARCH 100, ARCH 201, HS 100, HS 231, HS 232, HS 277, HIST 277 or by permission of the instructor. Students with credit for HS 313 or ARCH 313 cannot take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ARCH 322 under the title "Special Topics in Archaeology I: Roman Art and Archaeology" may not take this course for further credit.

HIST 304 - Alexander the Great and the Quest for World Empire (4)

Examines Alexander in the context of ancient history as well as his legacy, which provides unique insight into why there have been and continue to be illusive and deadly quests for world domination. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students who have taken HIST 391-4 D200 in Spring 2005, HIST 309-4 E100 in Spring 2006 or HIST 486 E100 in Summer 2007 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

or HUM 304 - Alexander the Great and the Quest for World Empire (4)

This course examines Alexander in the context of ancient history as well as his legacy, which provides unique insight into why there have been and continue to be illusive and deadly quests for world domination. Prerequisite: 45 units, including 9 units of lower division history credit or permission of instructor. Students with credit for HIST 304 or HS 304 may not repeat this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 302W - The Golden Age of Greece: An Integrated Society (4)

The study of Athenian society in the 5th century BC, a period unique in the record of human achievement during which virtually all the major humanistic fields were either initiated or received significant new impetus. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HUM 302 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 309 - Literatures and the Arts Across Cultures (4) **

An interdisciplinary study of literary texts in translation and/or art forms across cultures and periods. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HS 309 or WL 309 under this topic, or HS 303 under the title "Reflection on the Greek Civil War" may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 359 - Constructing the Nation State in Greece, the Balkans, and the Mediterranean (4) *

Investigates the construction of nation states in Greece, the Balkans and the Mediterranean with a focus on the ideas of the Nation and the Nation State. Examines specific cases such as Greece, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and the development of Israel. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HIST 359 or HS 359 may not take this course for further credit.

HUM 364 - Traveller, Diplomatic, and Media Narratives in Greece, the Balkans and the Mediterranean (4) *

Considers the accounts of foreign travellers and correspondents of the region in question from the early Grand Tour to the present and contrasts these accounts with historical facts and developments. Examines how perceptions regarding the Balkans (or the Mediterranean) were formed as well as their persistence in modern times. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HIST 364 or HS 364 may not take this course for further credit.

HUM 441 - Women, Property, and the Law in the Mediterranean (4) *

Examines the relationship between women and law through a focus on the question of property from the ancient world to the modem period and through a comprehensive examination of the Roman, Judaic, Christian, Islamic as well as modern legal traditions. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HS 441 or HIST 441 may not take this course for further credit.

HUM 460 - Themes in Byzantine History (4) *

Familiarizes the student with the main problems in the study of Byzantine social, political, economic and intellectual history. Students will be exposed to the main primary sources available to the Byzantinist and will read articles and books by the most influential scholars in the field of Byzantine studies. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HUM 460 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HS 460 or HIST 460 may take this course for credit only when a different topic is taught. Breadth-Humanities.

* These courses are also available with a HIST designation. Either HUM or HIST designation can be used towards the certificate.

** When topics are appropriate. Consult with the advisor.