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Philosophy and Humanities Joint Major

Bachelor of Arts

This joint major explores the relationship between the two disciplines. Students must plan their program in consultation with advisors in each department.

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Humanities Lower Division Requirements

Students complete 15 units including

HUM 101W - Introduction to the Humanities (3)

An introduction to issues and concepts central to the study of the Humanities. Through exposure to primary materials drawn from different periods and disciplines, students will become acquainted with a range of topics and ideas relating to the study of human values and human experience. Students with credit for HUM 101 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alessandra Capperdoni
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Alessandra Capperdoni
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Alessandra Capperdoni
Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

and one of

HUM 102W - Classical Mythology (3)

An introduction to the central myths of the Greeks and Romans. The course will investigate the nature, function, and meaning of myths in the classical world and their considerable influence on western civilization. Students with credit for HUM 102 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
HUM 105 - Many Europes: Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern (3)

A study of the many diverse peoples, languages, and regions of the European continent from the origins of civilization until the mid-16th century. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 110 - The Greek World (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the Greek culture in different periods. Using various sources and materials the course explores continuities and ruptures, evolutions and revolutions, and the impact such issues have on the imagination of people today. Students with credit for HS 100 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 130 - Introduction to Religious Studies (3)

An introduction to concepts central to the academic study of religion exploring various relevant methodologies. Provides a framework for understanding the many ways in which humans experience the phenomenon of the sacred through symbol, ritual, doctrine and experience in a variety of religious traditions and cultures. Students who have taken HUM 230 prior to 2007 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Jason Brown
TBD

and one of

HUM 202 - Great Texts in the Humanities (3)

An intensive study of some of the major works which have had a formative influence on the structure and development of western thought. Reading and discussion of primary texts and the major themes which emerge from them will introduce students to essential philosophical, literary, social and religious themes of western civilization. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 203 - Great Texts: Asian Thought and Literature (3)

An introduction to classic texts which have endured as monuments of Asian thought and literature. Readings and discussions of primary texts and their central ideas will introduce students to philosophical, literary and religious themes in a selected, major Asian tradition. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 204 - Great Religious Texts (3)

A study of some of the key works which have had a formative influence on major religious traditions. Primary texts will be selected to illustrate core elements in the religious understanding of human life and its relationship to the sacred. Prerequisite: HUM 130 (HUM 230 prior to 2007) is recommended. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 222 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Art (3)

Art as viewed through the history of art forms, ideas, material culture, and/or literature. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 231 - Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome (3)

Examines the social history of ancient Greece and Rome, particularly through the study of relevant artifacts, art, architecture, and ancient texts (in translation). Considers topics such as the lives of men, women, children and slaves; the home; dining; government; the economy; the army; death and burial; and entertainment. Students with credit for HS 231 or HUM 216 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

and two further lower division humanities courses.

Philosophy Lower Division Requirements

Students complete 12 units by completing all of

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Martin Hahn
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D111 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D112 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D113 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
PHIL 120W - Moral and Legal Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of moral and legal issues we confront in our dealings with the state and our fellow human beings, such as: Is it wrong to break the law? Should pornography and recreational drugs be illegal? Do animals have rights? Is there a duty to admit immigrants? Are there duties to the world's poor? Are indigenous peoples owed reparations? Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michaela Lucas
TBD
D101 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D111 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D112 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D113 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
PHIL 150 - Great Works in the History of Philosophy (3)

A thematic survey of some classical texts in the history of Western philosophy, from late Antiquity to the 19th century, including by figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, de Gournay, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Spinoza, Leibniz, du Châtelet, Hume, Astell, Wollstonecraft, Kant, Mill, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and others. Themes may include the nature of the human being, the role of God in philosophical thought, conceptions of the good life, and others. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 151 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

PHIL 203 - Metaphysics (3)

An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

Humanities Upper Division Requirements

Students complete 20 units in upper division humanities courses.

Recommended

HUM 320 - Cross-Cultural Philosophy in the Humanities (4)

An exploration of the characteristic ways in which the humanities, with its emphasis on expression, belief and tradition, presents important philosophical concepts. Based upon an interdisciplinary selection of texts drawn from history, philosophy, literature and the arts. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 321W - The Humanities and Critical Thinking (4)

A study of the counter-traditions within western civilization. Compares and contrasts diverse traditions within western culture that critique its central value systems. It will focus on the attempts of great artists and thinkers to break with tradition, and the subsequent creation of new ideas and forms of experience and expression. Prerequisite: 45 units. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Philosophy Upper Division Requirements

Twenty-one philosophy units are required.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and minimum CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0 across all units attempted in each subject that is a major, a joint major, a minor, or an extended minor. FASS Departments may define specific requirements for their respective programs.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.