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Department of Geography | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2021

Physical Geography Major

Bachelor of Science

The department offers a bachelor of science (BSc) program in physical geography with three course streams targeting the academic requirements needed for employment or professional accreditation in the environmental and natural resource sectors.

(1) The biogeophysical science stream offers students a broad range of environmental science courses in physical geography, emphasizing biogeography, soils, hydrology, geomorphology and climatology. It targets the academic requirements needed to apply for registration as a Professional Agrologist in British Columbia, a skills-based professional accreditation required in the environmental and natural resource sectors.

(2) The geoscience stream offers coursework in environmental geoscience, emphasizing geomorphology, earth science, hydrology, soils and climatology. It targets the academic requirements needed to apply for registration as a Professional Geoscientist (environmental geoscience) in Canada, a skills-based professional accreditation required in the environmental and natural resource sectors. 

(3) The geosystems and GIScience stream targets the requirements necessary to apply the theory and techniques of GIScience in the environmental and natural resources sectors.

Requirements for each stream are given below. Students should contact the student advisor to plan their course work.

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Requirements

Common Requirements

All students, regardless of the stream they choose, will complete a total of 31-34 units, including all of

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 with a minimum grade of C, or CHEM 109 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 120 or 125 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

EASC 101 - Dynamic Earth (3)

Origin and character of minerals, rocks, Earth structure, Earth surface processes and plate tectonic theory. Primarily designed to deliver prereq. information to EASC majors/honours and students pursuing degrees in other Departments and Faculties that require a strong foundational course in Earth Science. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Cameron
Mo, We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
D102 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
D103 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
D104 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Jason Young
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

GEOG 266W - Geography in Practice (3)

An introduction to what geographers do in applied contexts, how geographic concepts relate to applied skills, and how to communicate what geography is and why geographical approaches are useful. The course will emphasize written and oral communication skills through regular writing assignments, feedback, and direct engagement with professional geographers. Prerequisite: One of: GEOG 100, GEOG 102, GEOG 104, GEOG 111. Writing.

and one of

MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4) *

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Seyyed Aliasghar Hosseini
Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3) *

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 154 - Calculus I for the Biological Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; elementary functions, optimization and approximation methods, and their applications; mathematical models of biological processes. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit. Quantitative.

and one of

MATH 152 - Calculus II (3) *

Riemann sum, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite, indefinite and improper integrals, approximate integration, integration techniques, applications of integration. First-order separable differential equations and growth models. Sequences and series, series tests, power series, convergence and applications of power series. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151, with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 155 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Vijaykumar Singh
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 155 - Calculus II for the Biological Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in the biological and medical sciences. Topics include: the integral, partial derivatives, differential equations, linear systems, and their applications; mathematical models of biological processes. Prerequisite: MATH 150, 151 or 154, with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 152 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mahdieh Malekian
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OPO1 TBD

and one of

PHYS 101 - Physics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Force and motion, conservation of energy and momentum, fluids, properties of soft matter and thermal physics with applications taken from the life sciences. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 or 157; BISC 100 or 101 or 102. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 120, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew DeBenedictis
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
PHYS 120 - Mechanics and Modern Physics (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

PHYS 125 - Mechanics and Special Relativity (3)

An enriched course in mechanics for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics. Special relativity and classical topics such as translational and rotational dynamics and conservation laws will be given a much more sophisticated treatment than in our other first-year courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Corequisite: MATH 151. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 120 or PHYS 140 may not take PHYS 125 for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 140 - Studio Physics - Mechanics and Modern Physics (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12, or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Students with credit for PHYS 125 or 120 or 101 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

and one of

GEOG 251 - Quantitative Geography (3) **

An introduction to basic quantitative techniques for the collection of geographic data. Topics include describing data, gathering samples, theoretical distributions, linking samples and populations, testing significance, and exploring spatial relationships all within practical, real-world application contexts. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111. Quantitative.

STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tim Swartz
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
STAT 270 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic laws of probability, sample distributions. Introduction to statistical inference and applications. Prerequisite: or Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158, with a minimum grade of C-. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Pai
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD

and one of

ARCH 286 - Cultural Heritage Management (3)

Examines cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build communities and nations. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage. Prerequisite: 30 units including one of ARCH 100, ARCH 101, ARCH 201, GEOG 100 or REM 100. Breadth-Humanities.

INDG 101 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies (3)

Introduces the nature and goals of Indigenous Studies as an academic discipline that emphasizes cultures and homelands of First Peoples. Students with credit for FNST 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Alix Shield
Mo, We 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OL01 Distance Education
INDG 286 - Indigenous Peoples and British Columbia: An Introduction (3)

Study of Indigenous peoples of BC and effects of historical and political processes on their livelihoods and homelands. Overview of indigeneity and connection to urbanization. Examines linguistic diversity and endangered state of BC First Nations languages; Indigenous ethnography; land rights movement; traditional cultural practices/beliefs; and social, educational and economic disparity. Prerequisite: Recommended: INDG 101. Students with credit for FNST 286 or SA 286 may not take this course for further credit.

*Students in the geoscience stream must take MATH 150 or 151; and 152.

**Students pursuing the GIScience certificate are required to take GEOG 251.

Biogeophysical Science Stream

The Professional Agrologist syllabus requirements of BCIA (British Columbia Institute of Agrologists) may be met through this stream. Students must choose elective courses in consultation with an academic advisor because BCIA has specific groupings of elective courses in its syllabus.

In addition to the common requirements shown above, students who choose this stream will complete 23 units, including

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school Biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better; and High school Chemistry 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or CHEM 111 with a C- or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Onkar Bains
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
BISC 102 - General Biology (4)

Survey of the diversity of life, and its evolutionary history on earth. The student is introduced to the study of genetics, development, and evolution, giving an overview of how these processes interact to produce form and function. Also included are principles of behavior and ecological relationships of organisms to each other and their environment. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Rolf Mathewes
Miranda Meents
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D201 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D202 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D203 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D204 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D205 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D206 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D207 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D208 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D209 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D210 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GEOG 221 - Economic Worlds (3)

The fundamentals of economics geography, the study of the forces that shape the arrangement of economic activity in the real world. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 253 - Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of remote sensing, including the relevant physical processes, digital image processing and information extraction, and a review of remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shivanand Balram
TBD
D101 TBD
D102 TBD
D103 TBD

and one of

BISC 204 - Introduction to Ecology (3)

An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102 with a grade of C- or better.

GEOG 215 - The Biosphere (3)

An introduction to the planetary biosphere, its living organisms, and their interactions with each other and the Earth system. Prerequisite: GEOG 111.

and one of

GEOG 213 - Introduction to Geomorphology (3)

An exploration of the processes that shape Earth's surface and the landforms that result. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 214 - Weather and Climate (3)

An examination of the basic principles and processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Topics include: radiation, greenhouse effect, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical storms, climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

Geoscience Stream

The Professional Environmental Geoscience syllabus requirements of EGBC (Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia) can be met through this stream. Students must choose elective courses in consultation with an academic advisor because EGBC has specific groupings of elective courses in its Environmental Geoscience syllabus.

In addition to the common requirements shown above, students who choose this stream will complete 27 units, including all of

EASC 201 - Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (3)

An introduction to the nature, origin and interpretation of stratified earth materials. Principles of lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy, sequence stratigraphy, the facies concept. Prerequisite: EASC 210 with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 202 - Introduction to Mineralogy (3)

Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry and chemical properties and chemical principles necessary for the study of minerals. Prerequisite: EASC 101 and CHEM 121. All with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 204 - Structural Geology I (3)

Description, classification and interpretation of earth structures: folds, faults, joints, cleavage and lineations. Elementary rock mechanics. Prerequisite: EASC 210, PHYS 101 or 120 or 125 or 140. All with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 210 - Evolving Earth (3)

The study of the evolution of the Earth, the geological time scale, fossils and evolution, stratigraphic concepts, geological history of western Canada. Prerequisite: EASC 101 with a grade of C- or better. Breadth-Science.

GEOG 213 - Introduction to Geomorphology (3)

An exploration of the processes that shape Earth's surface and the landforms that result. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 214 - Weather and Climate (3)

An examination of the basic principles and processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Topics include: radiation, greenhouse effect, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical storms, climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

and one of

BISC 204 - Introduction to Ecology (3)

An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102 with a grade of C- or better.

GEOG 215 - The Biosphere (3)

An introduction to the planetary biosphere, its living organisms, and their interactions with each other and the Earth system. Prerequisite: GEOG 111.

and one of

EASC 207 - Introduction to Applied Geophysics (3)

An introduction to geophysics emphasizing seismic, magnetic and gravimetric observations of the Earth. Applied geophysics. Prerequisite: MATH 152, and one of: (PHYS 102 and PHYS 130), (PHYS 121 and PHYS 133), (PHYS 126 and PHYS 133) or (PHYS 141). All with a grade of C- or better. Quantitative.

EASC 313 - Introduction to Soil and Rock Engineering (3)

An introduction to the engineering properties and behavior of soil and rock. Laboratory and field measurements of soil and rock properties. Applications in engineering design will be illustrated with case studies of slope stability, road design, foundations and underground excavations. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of soil and rock mechanics in the resources sector. Prerequisite: EASC 101, 204 or permission of instructor. All with a grade of C- or better.

and one of

GEOG 253 - Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of remote sensing, including the relevant physical processes, digital image processing and information extraction, and a review of remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shivanand Balram
TBD
D101 TBD
D102 TBD
D103 TBD

Geosystems and GIScience Stream

In addition to the common requirements shown above, students who choose this stream will complete 19 units, including both of

GEOG 253 - Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of remote sensing, including the relevant physical processes, digital image processing and information extraction, and a review of remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shivanand Balram
TBD
D101 TBD
D102 TBD
D103 TBD

and one of

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school Biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better; and High school Chemistry 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or CHEM 111 with a C- or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Onkar Bains
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Tu 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
BISC 102 - General Biology (4)

Survey of the diversity of life, and its evolutionary history on earth. The student is introduced to the study of genetics, development, and evolution, giving an overview of how these processes interact to produce form and function. Also included are principles of behavior and ecological relationships of organisms to each other and their environment. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Rolf Mathewes
Miranda Meents
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D201 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D202 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D203 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D204 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D205 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D206 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D207 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D208 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D209 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D210 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

and two of

GEOG 213 - Introduction to Geomorphology (3)

An exploration of the processes that shape Earth's surface and the landforms that result. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 214 - Weather and Climate (3)

An examination of the basic principles and processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Topics include: radiation, greenhouse effect, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical storms, climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

GEOG 215 - The Biosphere (3)

An introduction to the planetary biosphere, its living organisms, and their interactions with each other and the Earth system. Prerequisite: GEOG 111.

and one of

GEOG 221 - Economic Worlds (3)

The fundamentals of economics geography, the study of the forces that shape the arrangement of economic activity in the real world. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 241 - People, Place, Society (3)

An introduction to key concepts and contexts in contemporary geographical approaches to social practices, meanings, and struggles. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 261 - Encountering the City (3)

An introduction to key concepts and themes in contemporary geographical approaches to cities and urbanization. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 102. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Upper Division Requirements

Biogeophysical Science Stream

Students who choose this stream will complete a minimum total of 36 units, including all of

GEOG 311 - Hydrology (4)

Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on the hydrology of British Columbia; description and analysis of the processes of water movement and storage measurements and analysis of hydrologic data. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 or 214; GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 317 - Soil Science (4)

An introduction to the study of soils: physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil formation, description, classification, survey and use. Field and laboratory techniques of soil analysis. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 213, 214, 215, or CHEM 121. Students with credit for GEOG 318 may not take this course for further credit.

and one of

GEOG 312 - Geography of Natural Hazards (4)

An exploration of human response to our hazardous Earth. The dynamic causes of natural hazards such as earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides and floods will be illustrated. Students will gain an appreciation for how humans perceive, predict, and recover from hazards and how their effects may be reduced. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 100, 104 or 111 or one of EASC 101 or 104. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
GEOG 385 - Food and the City (4)

An exploration of how food is related to cities, giving particular attention to the culture and politics of food production, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

GEOG 428 - World Forests (4)

Comparative analysis of forest industries, ecosystems and policies, and their lessons for forest management in British Columbia. Topics include tropical deforestation and carbon sequestration, the wilderness debate, and forests in culture and the visual arts. Prerequisite: GEOG 315, or 322, or 389.

REM 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for ENV 321 cannot take REM 321 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

REM 445 - Environmental Risk Assessment (4)

Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157; STAT 201 or 203 or 205 or GEOG 251 or equivalent; and 60 units.

and four of the following (at least one of which must be at the 400 division)

GEOG 310 - Physical Geography Field Course (4)

A twelve-day field camp with a focus on various measuring, surveying, recording and mapping skills in branches of physical geography. A selected project will be completed either by a team or by an individual. Field camp locations will vary from year to year. The camp will be held immediately following the end of final examinations in April. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 and one of GEOG 214 or 215. Prerequisite or Corequisite: One of GEOG 311, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317 or 319.

GEOG 313 - River Geomorphology (4)

Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. Prerequisite: GEOG 213, or both EASC 209W and EASC 304. Quantitative.

GEOG 314 - The Climate System (4)

A survey of the climate system, with emphasis on the interactions among its components; radiation, energy and water balances; climate sensitivity and feedbacks; natural and anthropogenic climate change; climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 214. Recommended: MATH 151 and 152 or MATH 154 and 155 or MATH 157 and 158. Quantitative.

GEOG 315 - World Ecosystems (4)

Distribution, structure, function, and dynamics of the world's major biomes. Attention to comparative aspects among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to environmental problems associated with the biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.

GEOG 316 - Global Biogeochemical and Water Cycles (4)

Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

GEOG 411 - Advanced Hydrology (4)

An examination of hydrologic processes at different scales; effects of climate and land use change on the hydrologic cycle; application of hydrologic models; recent research developments in selected sub-fields of hydrology. Prerequisite: one of GEOG 311, 313, or 314; one of GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 412W - Glacial Processes and Environments (4)

An examination of glacial processes and environments emphasizing landscapes and sediments resulting from the movement of ice, water, and sediment; application of field techniques. Prerequisite: 60 units, including GEOG 213; GEOG 313 and EASC 201 recommended. Writing.

GEOG 414 - Climate Change (4)

An examination of recent advances in climate change science drawing upon observational and theoretical studies; application of climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 314. Quantitative.

GEOG 417W - Advanced Soil Science (4)

Advanced treatment of topics in soil science: soil physics, soil chemistry, soil biology, soil classification and/or forest soils. Prerequisite: GEOG 317. Students with credit for GEOG 417 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GEOG 418 - Ecohydrology (4)

Interdisciplinary exploration of the interactions between plants and hydrologic processes, with an emphasis on primary literature. Topics covered include evapotranspiration, subsurface water storage in time and space, plant water relations, isotopes in water, biogeographical patterns, modeling, field methods, and the role of ecohydrology in Earth’s climate system. Mandatory field trip. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 311, GEOG 314, GEOG 316, GEOG 317, EASC 304, or EASC 405; one of GEOG 251, STAT 201, STAT 203 (formerly STAT 103), STAT 205, or STAT 270.

and two of

GEOG 351 - Multimedia Cartography (4)

Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 352 - Spatial Analysis (4)

Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. Topics include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 353 - Advanced Remote Sensing (4)

Advanced remote sensing principles and techniques, including physics-based modeling, advanced classifiers, automated data processing, and integration of ancillary data products. Prerequisite: GEOG 253. Quantitative.

GEOG 355 - Geographical Information Science II (4)

An examination of technical components of GIS. Topics include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

and a minimum of 8 additional upper division units from BISC, CHEM, CMPT, EASC, EVSC, GEOG, MACM, MASC, MATH, MBB, PHYS or STAT courses. At least four of these must be GEOG units.

Geoscience Stream

Students who choose this stream must complete a minimum of 40 units including all of

GEOG 310 - Physical Geography Field Course (4)

A twelve-day field camp with a focus on various measuring, surveying, recording and mapping skills in branches of physical geography. A selected project will be completed either by a team or by an individual. Field camp locations will vary from year to year. The camp will be held immediately following the end of final examinations in April. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 and one of GEOG 214 or 215. Prerequisite or Corequisite: One of GEOG 311, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317 or 319.

GEOG 311 - Hydrology (4)

Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on the hydrology of British Columbia; description and analysis of the processes of water movement and storage measurements and analysis of hydrologic data. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 or 214; GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 312 - Geography of Natural Hazards (4)

An exploration of human response to our hazardous Earth. The dynamic causes of natural hazards such as earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides and floods will be illustrated. Students will gain an appreciation for how humans perceive, predict, and recover from hazards and how their effects may be reduced. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 100, 104 or 111 or one of EASC 101 or 104. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
GEOG 313 - River Geomorphology (4)

Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. Prerequisite: GEOG 213, or both EASC 209W and EASC 304. Quantitative.

GEOG 316 - Global Biogeochemical and Water Cycles (4)

Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

GEOG 317 - Soil Science (4)

An introduction to the study of soils: physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil formation, description, classification, survey and use. Field and laboratory techniques of soil analysis. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 213, 214, 215, or CHEM 121. Students with credit for GEOG 318 may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 412W - Glacial Processes and Environments (4)

An examination of glacial processes and environments emphasizing landscapes and sediments resulting from the movement of ice, water, and sediment; application of field techniques. Prerequisite: 60 units, including GEOG 213; GEOG 313 and EASC 201 recommended. Writing.

and three (12 units) of the following, including at least one (4 units) from Physical Geography (GEOG 31X or 41X courses) and at least one (4 units) from GIScience (GEOG 35X or 45X courses)

GEOG 314 - The Climate System (4)

A survey of the climate system, with emphasis on the interactions among its components; radiation, energy and water balances; climate sensitivity and feedbacks; natural and anthropogenic climate change; climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 214. Recommended: MATH 151 and 152 or MATH 154 and 155 or MATH 157 and 158. Quantitative.

GEOG 351 - Multimedia Cartography (4)

Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 352 - Spatial Analysis (4)

Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. Topics include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 353 - Advanced Remote Sensing (4)

Advanced remote sensing principles and techniques, including physics-based modeling, advanced classifiers, automated data processing, and integration of ancillary data products. Prerequisite: GEOG 253. Quantitative.

GEOG 355 - Geographical Information Science II (4)

An examination of technical components of GIS. Topics include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 356 - 3D GIScience (4)

Introduction to 3D spatial data, 3D analysis, and 3D visualization for spatial problems. Students will gain skills in 3D aspects of GIScience concepts; data generation and use; analysis and simulation; visualization and its use for interpretation and communication. Prerequisite: GEOG 255.

GEOG 411 - Advanced Hydrology (4)

An examination of hydrologic processes at different scales; effects of climate and land use change on the hydrologic cycle; application of hydrologic models; recent research developments in selected sub-fields of hydrology. Prerequisite: one of GEOG 311, 313, or 314; one of GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 414 - Climate Change (4)

An examination of recent advances in climate change science drawing upon observational and theoretical studies; application of climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 314. Quantitative.

GEOG 417W - Advanced Soil Science (4)

Advanced treatment of topics in soil science: soil physics, soil chemistry, soil biology, soil classification and/or forest soils. Prerequisite: GEOG 317. Students with credit for GEOG 417 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GEOG 418 - Ecohydrology (4)

Interdisciplinary exploration of the interactions between plants and hydrologic processes, with an emphasis on primary literature. Topics covered include evapotranspiration, subsurface water storage in time and space, plant water relations, isotopes in water, biogeographical patterns, modeling, field methods, and the role of ecohydrology in Earth’s climate system. Mandatory field trip. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 311, GEOG 314, GEOG 316, GEOG 317, EASC 304, or EASC 405; one of GEOG 251, STAT 201, STAT 203 (formerly STAT 103), STAT 205, or STAT 270.

GEOG 451 - Spatial Modeling (4)

Spatial models for the representation and simulation of physical, human and environmental processes. GIS and spatial analysis software are used in the laboratory for model development, from problem definition and solution to visualization. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270; one of GEOG 351, 352, 353, 355 or 356. Quantitative.

GEOG 453 - Theoretical and Applied Remote Sensing (4)

Examination of advanced topics in remote sensing, including calibration /validation, spatial scale, data fusion, and the role of remote sensing in a spatial world. Students will work on independent projects applying remote sensing in their area of interest. Prerequisite: GEOG 353. Recommended: One of GEOG 351, 352, 355 or 356. Students with credit for GEOG 453W may not repeat this course for further credit. Quantitative.

GEOG 455 - Theoretical and Applied GIS (4)

A critical examination of advanced topics in GIS, such as: boundary definition, expert systems and artificial intelligence, error and uncertainty, and scale in a digital context. Examines social applications and the roles of GIS in society. Students will design original projects, including data acquisition, analysis, and web site development. Prerequisite: GEOG 355. Students with credit for GEOG 452 or GEOG 455W may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

GEOG 457 - Geovisualization Interfaces (4)

The concepts, theories, and technology behind interactive and immersive interface technologies used for geospatial visualization. Applications and implications for GIScience and spatial knowledge acquisition. Combines GIScience, spatial cognition, and virtual environments/interface research perspectives. Prerequisite: GEOG 356. Students with credit for GEOG 457 (STT) Geospatial Virtual Environments in fall 2005 or fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

and a minimum of 4 additional upper division units from BISC, CHEM, CMPT, EASC, EVSC, GEOG, MACM, MASC, MATH, MBB, PHYS or STAT courses.

Geosystems and GIScience Stream

Students who choose this stream will complete a minimum total of 24 units, including three (12 units) of the following

GEOG 310 - Physical Geography Field Course (4)

A twelve-day field camp with a focus on various measuring, surveying, recording and mapping skills in branches of physical geography. A selected project will be completed either by a team or by an individual. Field camp locations will vary from year to year. The camp will be held immediately following the end of final examinations in April. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 and one of GEOG 214 or 215. Prerequisite or Corequisite: One of GEOG 311, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317 or 319.

GEOG 311 - Hydrology (4)

Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on the hydrology of British Columbia; description and analysis of the processes of water movement and storage measurements and analysis of hydrologic data. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 or 214; GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 313 - River Geomorphology (4)

Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. Prerequisite: GEOG 213, or both EASC 209W and EASC 304. Quantitative.

GEOG 314 - The Climate System (4)

A survey of the climate system, with emphasis on the interactions among its components; radiation, energy and water balances; climate sensitivity and feedbacks; natural and anthropogenic climate change; climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 214. Recommended: MATH 151 and 152 or MATH 154 and 155 or MATH 157 and 158. Quantitative.

GEOG 315 - World Ecosystems (4)

Distribution, structure, function, and dynamics of the world's major biomes. Attention to comparative aspects among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to environmental problems associated with the biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.

GEOG 316 - Global Biogeochemical and Water Cycles (4)

Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

GEOG 317 - Soil Science (4)

An introduction to the study of soils: physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil formation, description, classification, survey and use. Field and laboratory techniques of soil analysis. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 213, 214, 215, or CHEM 121. Students with credit for GEOG 318 may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 411 - Advanced Hydrology (4)

An examination of hydrologic processes at different scales; effects of climate and land use change on the hydrologic cycle; application of hydrologic models; recent research developments in selected sub-fields of hydrology. Prerequisite: one of GEOG 311, 313, or 314; one of GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 412W - Glacial Processes and Environments (4)

An examination of glacial processes and environments emphasizing landscapes and sediments resulting from the movement of ice, water, and sediment; application of field techniques. Prerequisite: 60 units, including GEOG 213; GEOG 313 and EASC 201 recommended. Writing.

GEOG 414 - Climate Change (4)

An examination of recent advances in climate change science drawing upon observational and theoretical studies; application of climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 314. Quantitative.

GEOG 417W - Advanced Soil Science (4)

Advanced treatment of topics in soil science: soil physics, soil chemistry, soil biology, soil classification and/or forest soils. Prerequisite: GEOG 317. Students with credit for GEOG 417 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GEOG 418 - Ecohydrology (4)

Interdisciplinary exploration of the interactions between plants and hydrologic processes, with an emphasis on primary literature. Topics covered include evapotranspiration, subsurface water storage in time and space, plant water relations, isotopes in water, biogeographical patterns, modeling, field methods, and the role of ecohydrology in Earth’s climate system. Mandatory field trip. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 311, GEOG 314, GEOG 316, GEOG 317, EASC 304, or EASC 405; one of GEOG 251, STAT 201, STAT 203 (formerly STAT 103), STAT 205, or STAT 270.

and three (12 units) of the following

GEOG 351 - Multimedia Cartography (4)

Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 352 - Spatial Analysis (4)

Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. Topics include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 353 - Advanced Remote Sensing (4)

Advanced remote sensing principles and techniques, including physics-based modeling, advanced classifiers, automated data processing, and integration of ancillary data products. Prerequisite: GEOG 253. Quantitative.

GEOG 355 - Geographical Information Science II (4)

An examination of technical components of GIS. Topics include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 356 - 3D GIScience (4)

Introduction to 3D spatial data, 3D analysis, and 3D visualization for spatial problems. Students will gain skills in 3D aspects of GIScience concepts; data generation and use; analysis and simulation; visualization and its use for interpretation and communication. Prerequisite: GEOG 255.

GEOG 451 - Spatial Modeling (4)

Spatial models for the representation and simulation of physical, human and environmental processes. GIS and spatial analysis software are used in the laboratory for model development, from problem definition and solution to visualization. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270; one of GEOG 351, 352, 353, 355 or 356. Quantitative.

GEOG 453 - Theoretical and Applied Remote Sensing (4)

Examination of advanced topics in remote sensing, including calibration /validation, spatial scale, data fusion, and the role of remote sensing in a spatial world. Students will work on independent projects applying remote sensing in their area of interest. Prerequisite: GEOG 353. Recommended: One of GEOG 351, 352, 355 or 356. Students with credit for GEOG 453W may not repeat this course for further credit. Quantitative.

GEOG 455 - Theoretical and Applied GIS (4)

A critical examination of advanced topics in GIS, such as: boundary definition, expert systems and artificial intelligence, error and uncertainty, and scale in a digital context. Examines social applications and the roles of GIS in society. Students will design original projects, including data acquisition, analysis, and web site development. Prerequisite: GEOG 355. Students with credit for GEOG 452 or GEOG 455W may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

GEOG 457 - Geovisualization Interfaces (4)

The concepts, theories, and technology behind interactive and immersive interface technologies used for geospatial visualization. Applications and implications for GIScience and spatial knowledge acquisition. Combines GIScience, spatial cognition, and virtual environments/interface research perspectives. Prerequisite: GEOG 356. Students with credit for GEOG 457 (STT) Geospatial Virtual Environments in fall 2005 or fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

and a minimum of 20 additional upper division units from BISC, CHEM, CMPT, EASC, EVSC, GEOG, MACM, MASC, MATH, MBB, PHYS or STAT courses. At least 12 of these must be GEOG units.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.