Please note:

To view the current Academic Calendar, go to www.sfu.ca/students/calendar.html.

Department of Philosophy | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Fall 2022

Philosophy Minor

See below for Philosophy Minor: Concentration in Law and Philosophy.

The following curriculum pertains to students who wish to complete a philosophy minor in conjunction with a major in another department, school or program.

With the undergraduate advisor, a student may design a minor program with an emphasis that complements a special interest. For example, programs may be designed for students with an interest in law, language, natural or social science, history of ideas, social theory, value theory or logic.

Program Requirements

Lower Division Requirements

There are no specific lower division requirements, but all upper division PHIL courses have prerequisites.

Upper Division Requirements

Students must complete at least 15 philosophy upper division units, not including PHIL 300, with a minimum philosophy cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and philosophy upper division grade point average (UDGPA) of 2.0 (calculated on all SFU PHIL courses).

Philosophy Minor: Concentration in Law and Philosophy

Students may qualify for this concentration by completing the following upper division requirements along with the associated lower division prerequisites.

Students complete at least 18 philosophy upper division units, with a minimum philosophy cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and philosophy upper division grade point average (UDGPA) of 2.0 (calculated on all SFU PHIL courses), including

PHIL 326 - Topics in Law and Philosophy (3)

Explores in detail classic problems in the law using the methods and resources of philosophy. Topics may include: problems in professional ethics facing lawyers; philosophical issues in international law and human rights; constitutional interpretation and the philosophy of language; the assessment of evidence and formal epistemology; the intellectual origins of the theory of natural law and natural rights; or others. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120, 120W, 121, 220, 221, 270, SDA 270, ENV 320W, or REM 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bruno Guindon
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
PHIL 329 - Law and Justice (3)

Explores in detail the relationship between the law and theories of justice. Topics range over: the philosophy of punishment, theories of moral responsibility, charter equality rights, and theories of distributive justice. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120, 120W, 121, 220, 221, 270, SDA 270, ENV 320W, or REM 320W. Students with credit for PHIL 333 in Spring 2016 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Evan Tiffany
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
B101 Evan Tiffany
TBD

and at least two of

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120, 120W, 121, 220, 221, 270, SDA 270, ENV 320W, or REM 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Chelsea Rosenthal
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120, 120W, 121, 220, 221, 270, SDA 270, ENV 320W, or REM 320W.

PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120, 120W, 121, 150, 151, 220, 221, 270, SDA 270, ENV 320W, or REM 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Black
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3253, Burnaby
PHIL 327 - Global Health Ethics (3)

Ethical issues related to public health as they are located in and influenced by a global context. Consideration of several ethical approaches including utilitarianism, deontic ethics, and the capabilities approach, as well as theories of justice. Application of approaches to topics ranging from global markets in human organs to international migration of health workers and pharmaceutical testing in the developing world. Prerequisite: 60 units and one of the following: PHIL 120, PHIL 120W, PHIL 121, PHIL 221, PHIL 270, HSCI 319, SDA 270. PHIL 327 is identical to HSCI 327 and students may not receive credit for both. Students who have completed HSCI 320 or the spring 2011 offering of PHIL 331 may not complete this course for further credit.

PHIL 328 - Environmental Philosophy (3)

A survey of contemporary issues in environmental ethics. Topics may include: animal rights, the intrinsic value of nature, 'deep ecology', obligations to future generations, conservation, environmental justice, as well as relevant background materials in ethical theory. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120, 120W, 121, 220, 221, 270, SDA 270, ENV 320W, or REM 320W. Students who have completed PHIL 318 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 421W - Advanced Topics in Ethical Theory (4)

A highly focused, advanced examination of a selection of topics in normative or meta-ethics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Two 300-level PHIL courses; it is strongly recommended that students have taken some prior course in moral theory. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Chelsea Rosenthal
Th 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
B101 Chelsea Rosenthal
TBD

PHIL 300 may not be used to satisfy the upper division requirements of this program.

Seminars and Special Topics Courses

A student may not enroll in a philosophy seminar or selected topics course which duplicates work for which the student has received credit in another philosophy seminar or special topics course.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 60 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division overall CGPA of at least 2.0, and program CGPA and upper division program CGPA of at least 2.0 on the course work used to satisfy the minimum program requirements. FASS departments may define additional GPA requirements for their respective programs.

For students in other faculties, please check your faculty's overall degree requirements: https://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/faculties-research.html

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.