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School for International Studies | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2022

International Studies

Certificate

The Certificate in International Studies caters to students who wish to embark on internationally-engaged careers. The program supplements disciplinary training with contextual knowledge of the world beyond Canada. Students may focus on one or more regions of the world.

Program Requirements

Required Courses

Students complete a minimum of 24 units including

IS 101 - Global Challenges of the 21st Century: An Introduction to International Studies (3)

Introduces the interdisciplinary field of International Studies to all undergraduates and IS majors. Examines the major global challenges of our time, including poverty and inequality, environmental degradation, nationalism, civil war, and armed conflict. Explores the challenge of global governance and global citizenship. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Megan MacKenzie
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D102 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D103 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D104 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D105 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D106 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
IS 265 - Global History from the Revolutionary Age to the Present (3)

An introduction to Global History, beginning in the 1780s and ending in the present day. Key topics include the first Age of Revolution (US, Haiti, Latin America), the post-colonial experience, and the modern world economy. Students with credit for HIST 265 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

or HIST 265 - Global History from the Revolutionary Age to the Present (3)

An introduction to Global History, beginning in the 1780s and ending in the present day. Key topics include the first Age of Revolution (US, Haiti, Latin America), the post-colonial experience, and the modern world economy. Students with credit for IS 265 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

The remaining 18 units may be chosen from courses below.

Africa

HIST 146 - Africa after the Transatlantic Slave Trade (3)

An introductory survey of colonization, of social, political and environmental change under colonial rule, and of the stormy history of state-society relations in Africa since independence. Breadth-Humanities.

HIST 344 - Themes in Modern East Africa (4)

Examines the diversity of environments, cultures and livelihoods in East Africa and the Horn in the context of long-term trans-regional influences, especially slave trade, cash cropping, colonization and post-colonial politics, and the expansion of the world religions into East Africa. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 344 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sarah Walshaw
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2522, Burnaby
IS 323 - Sub-Saharan Africa: Key Issues and Understandings (4)

Survey course of major contemporary issues relevant to people's lives in Sub-Saharan Africa as well as major debates about these. Study of the historic, economic, political, social and cultural factors contributing to contemporary realities and perspectives. Relevant for students with little to significant familiarity with life in Africa. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 325 - Social Movements in a Changing Africa (4)

From peasant uprisings and student protests to armed insurrections, this course explores the range of African social movements and assesses their role in shaping Africa's future. Key themes include the role of ethnicity and religion, the impact of urbanization, economic inequality, gender politics, and trends in international solidarity and engagement. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken IS 319 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jason Stearns
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver

Asia

GA 101 - Introduction to Global Asia (3)

Introduces developments in Asia from a comparative and transregional perspective, focusing on economic interactions, cultural influences, as well as migrations. Surveys various issues, both historical and contemporary, including those involving diasporic Asian communities. Students with credit for ASC 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nadine Attewell
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10011, Burnaby
D101 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D102 Nadine Attewell
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D103 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D104 Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
GA 200 - Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3)

An introduction to historical and cultural perspectives on China. Topics covered will include different aspects of traditional Chinese civilization with a view to understanding contemporary Chinese society. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for ASC 200 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

GA 201 - Introduction to Japanese Civilization (3)

An introduction to historical and cultural perspectives covering the basic aspects of Japan: geography, history, culture, politics, economy, etc. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for ASC 201 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Simon Nantais
Simon Nantais
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3220, Burnaby
D101 Simon Nantais
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D102 Simon Nantais
Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
GA 202 - Studies in Asian Cultures (3)

An introduction to the culture of one or more Asian regions. The emphasis will be on the cultural importance of the themes covered and on their relationship to contemporary societies. This course may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for ASC 202 may not take this course for further credit.

HIST 206 - Imperial Japan (ca. 1868-1952) (3)

A survey of Japanese history from 1868 until 1952 which will examine, among other topics, the evolution of its colonial empire and wars with Russia, China and the United States, as well as the post-war Allied Occupation. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Janice Matsumura
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4120, Burnaby
D101 Janice Matsumura
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102 Janice Matsumura
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
HIST 243 - A Brief History of Modern India - from British Colony to Independent Republic (3)

A survey of South Asian history designed to equip those students completely unfamiliar with the region, with a foundation in the political, social and cultural contours of South Asia from 1757 to 1947. Students who have previously taken HIST 243 STT may not take HIST 243 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bidisha Ray
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2507, Burnaby
D101 Bidisha Ray
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
D102 Bidisha Ray
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3515, Burnaby
HIST 244 - Colonialism and Nationalism in South Asia (3)

South Asian history since the eighteenth century, including the crumbling of the Mughal empire, European trade and colonialism, Indian nationalisms, the emergence of the independent states of India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, and transformations in caste, gender, and sexuality. Breadth-Humanities.

HIST 255 - China since 1800 (3)

A survey of the history of China from the end of the eighteenth century, when traditional Chinese society was arguably at its height of development, to the end of the twentieth century when the social revolutions promised by the Communist regime have clearly failed to materialize. The main objectives are to provide students with vocabularies and tools to understand and interpret the political, social and cultural transformations in modern China and to initiate them in the art and techniques of historical analysis. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jeremy Brown
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101 Jeremy Brown
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D102 Jeremy Brown
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D103 Jeremy Brown
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D104 Jeremy Brown
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D105 Jeremy Brown
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D106 Jeremy Brown
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
HIST 371 - The Asia-Pacific War in Modern Japanese History (4)

Covers the period in Japan from the 1930s to the 1950s and will introduce students to topics such as wartime atrocities, the dropping of the atomic bombs and the prosecution of war criminals. It will also attempt to explain why so much controversy surrounds interpretations of events arising from Japan's last war, the Asia-Pacific War. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Recommended: at least one course on modern Japan.

HIST 464 - Problems in Modern Asian History (4)

Concepts and methodology of modern Asian history. Selected themes may include revolution, inequality, mass violence, ideology, imperialism, leadership, and the Cold War. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 464 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Janice Matsumura
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
IS 303 - Ethnic Minorities, Identity Politics, and Conflict in Southeast Asia (4)

Surveys the ethnic minorities of Southeast Asia, focusing on their relations with other ethnic groups, especially majority populations, and governments. Examines the treatment of ethnic minorities and the responses of the minorities, including ethnic-based secession movements. Reviews cross-border and broader international issues relating to minorities, such as their status as refugees and cross-border support for insurgencies. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 313W - Nationalism, Democracy and Development in Modern India (4)

An examination of the differing narratives of nation and modernity in the struggle for independence from colonial rule in India, and their implications for the post-colonial state, for politics and for India's economic development. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 210 or 220. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Logan Masilamani
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
IS 314 - National, Regional, and International Politics in Southeast Asia (4)

Provides an overview of national and political issues in Southeast Asia. Surveying politics in individual countries and regional political institutions, focus is given to particular themes such as democratization and civil society, communism and other forms of authoritarianism, the role of the military, decentralization, religion and politics, the impact of China on the region, and security concerns. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 322 - Central Asia: Conflict and Security (4)

Examines the new states of post-Soviet Central Asia, with particular reference to the relationship among democratization, development, autocracy and conflict, and the role of external actors in transnational security issues in the region. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 200. Students with credit for IS 412 may not take this course for further credit.

IS 333 - Chinese Development and Its Discontents (4)

Explores China's stunning rise from Mao to global markets, with attention to social issues brought on by "the Chinese Development Model". Examines the bases of state legitimacy in contemporary China, challenges to state legitimacy, as well as state responses to these challenges. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 414 - Current Regional Issues in Southeast Asia (4)

Reviews important current regional issues in Southeast Asia with particular attention to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. Prerequisite: 45 units.

SA 275 - China in Transition (SA) (4)

An introduction to culture, social structure and the processes of social, economic, and political transformation in contemporary China. Topics may include recent development of Marxism, feminism and neoliberalism in China; Western debates on China's rise and images of China as threat; human rights.

Europe

HIST 224 - Europe from the French Revolution to the First World War (3)

A survey of European history emphasizing the French Revolution, and Napoleonic Europe and first Industrial Revolution, liberalism and its opponents, agrarian conservatism, liberalism and conservatism, the Revolutions of 1848, the struggles for political unification, the second Industrial Revolution and the origins of the First World War. Breadth-Humanities.

HIST 225 - 20th Century Europe (3)

A survey of European history from the First World War emphasizing the origins and effects of the World Wars, the emergence of the Soviet Union and of fascism. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Garfinkel
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D101 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D103 Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D104 Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D105 Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106 Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
HIST 279 - Greece in the 20th Century (3)

Examines the political and socio-economic evolution of 20th century Greece in tandem with the cultural transformation of the country from an agrarian based society to the urban dominated structure that characterizes Greece today. Students with credit for HS 279 may not take HIST 279 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

or HUM 279 - Greece in the 20th Century (3)

Examines the political and socio-economic evolution of 20th century Greece in tandem with the cultural transformation of the country from an agrarian based society to the urban dominated structure that characterizes Greece today. Students with credit for HIST 279 or HS 279 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HIST 335 - The Soviet Project (4)

An examination of the history of the Soviet Union from its creation to its collapse, emphasizing its ideology, culture, role in global politics, and social and economic transformations. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ilya Vinkovetsky
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3220, Burnaby
D101 Ilya Vinkovetsky
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D102 Ilya Vinkovetsky
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
IS 304 - Russian Foreign and Security Policies (4)

Introduces the Russian Federation's foreign and security policies. Reviews key actors, institutions, and stages in the development of Russian foreign policy development as well as the gap between rhetoric and realities in Russian foreign policy. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 200 and HIST 335.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicole Jackson
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
SA 330 - Global Islam (SA) (4)

Explores the interplay between global Islamic politics and European modernity, including the neoliberal remaking of citizens, societies and states. Historical, comparative and global perspectives address the limitations of conventional approaches that situate Islam within dichotomous models of what is western and what is eastern, and modern versus non-modern. Prerequisite: SA 101 or SA 150 or SA 201W.

Latin America

IS 209 - Latin America: the National Period (3)

A survey of Latin American history from Independence (1808-24) to the present: post-Independence political collapse and reconsolidation; Latin America in the world trade system and the changing conditions of economic dependency; nationalist reform (Mexico) and socialist revolution (Cuba), liberalism, populism, and the rise of modernizing military. Treatment by topics and broad historical period rather than county by county. Students who take this course may not take HIST 209 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

IS 435 - Special Topics in Latin American Studies (4)

An examination of Latin America through historical, literary, and social scientific approaches. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: IS 209W or HIST 209W.

The Middle East

HIST 355 - The Arab Middle East in the Twentieth Century (4)

An examination of this century's major themes in the history of Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, as well as other states of the Arabian peninsula. Topics to be investigated include the origins of Arab nationalism and Islamic reformism; the origins and development of the Lebanese question; the emergence of the politics of the military in Iraq and Syria, and the special role of the Jordanian and Arabian monarchies. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Recommended: one of HIST 151, 249.

HIST 457 - The Turkish Republic: Politics, Society, and Culture, 1918-Present (4)

Examines the political, social, and cultural transformation in Turkey from the end of World War I to the present. Topics may include the Ottoman legacy in the Turkish Republic, issues of nation building, national identity and ethnicity, the role of the military in Turkish politics, changing concepts of gender, the role of political Islam, and Turkish diasporas. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 151 and 249.

HIST 465 - The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (4)

A discussion of the modern history of nation-building in the context of the Arab-Israeli conflict. The topics discussed include Zionism, the British Mandate in Palestine, the creation of the state of Israel, the rise of modern Palestinian nationalism, and the role of the Palestinian-Israeli dispute in regional and international affairs. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history and one of HIST 151, 249, 350, 354, 355 or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Sedra
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
HIST 467 - Modern Egypt (4)

An interpretive discussion of the course of modern Egyptian history. This may range from the advent to power of Muhammed Ali Pasha until recent times, or may focus on specific periods of revolutionary change. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history and one of HIST 151, 249, 350, 354, 355 or permission of the department.

IS 315 - Introduction to Middle East Politics (4)

Introduces the political, economic, and ideological dynamics of contemporary Middle Eastern states. Examines the legacy of colonialism, state formation, central ideological trends such as Arab nationalism and political Islam, the dynamics of state-society contention, and the challenges of economic development. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
IS 415 - Islamist Trend in Middle East Politics (4)

Focuses upon the political Islamist movements that have swept much of the Middle East and North Africa since the mid-1970s. Examines a broad range of movements, from liberal to militant trends, drawing on the experiences of countries throughout the region. Prerequisite: 45 units. Recommended: HIST 151 or IS 315.

Global, Variable, or Cross-Regional Coverage

GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Blomley
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D200 Jason Young
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
GSWS 309 - Gender and International Development (4)

Examines from interdisciplinary and international perspectives how development is gendered and creates differential impacts, meanings and processes for women and men around the world. Prerequisite: 15 units. Students with credit for GSWS 310 (or WS 310) Special Topic: Women and Development or GSWS 301 (or WS 301) Special Topic: Gender and Development or GSWS 309 (or WS 309) under the title Gender and Development may not take this course for further credit.

HIST 130 - Introduction to Global History (3)

A survey of the history of the world, with a focus on global historical phenomena of the last six centuries. Breadth-Humanities.

HSCI 160 - Global Perspectives on Health (3)

An introduction to the differences in health and health services among the nations of the globe. Vulnerable sub-populations worldwide and their special health needs. Mechanisms whereby events in one country can impact health in another. Future worldwide health risks, their economic and health consequences. SARS, avian 'flu,' West Nile virus, 'mad cow disease,' antibiotic resistant malaria or tuberculosis. Dangers to rich and poor nations from ignoring health problems in developing world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Angela Kaida
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
IS 200 - Security and Global Governance: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (3)

Examines contemporary security and governance challenges by drawing on insights from across the social sciences. Includes such topics as: war, nuclear proliferation, genocide, human trafficking, and global health threats. Explores the role of international organizations (the UN, EU, NATO and others) in addressing security challenges and advancing global governance. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jason Stearns
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3150, Burnaby
D101 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D104 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D105 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
IS 210 - Comparative World Politics: Trajectories, Regimes, Challenges (3)

Introduces students to the variety of systems of governance in the world today, examines the historical and cultural sources of their different developmental trajectories, and assesses the challenges they face in the future. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Matijasevich
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D101 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D102 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D104 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D900 David Matijasevich
Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 3240, Surrey
IS 220 - Wealth and Poverty of Nations (3)

Analyzes some of the historical reasons for the great divergence in world economic development, and undertakes a cross-country, cross-regional perspective of world economic development using a historical approach to long-run economic growth. Breadth-Social Sciences.

IS 230 - Beyond the Nation-State: Identity and Belonging in a Globalized World (3)

This course surveys the diverse ways people have fashioned identities and social relations that do not easily conform to the boundaries of nation-states. Explores how, in the context of transnational movements of people and ideas, individuals and communities construct and contest new identities, aspirations, and forms of belonging. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Elizabeth Cooper
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
D101 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
D102 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D103 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
IS 301 - Returning from Abroad: Discussion Seminar to Unpack the Experience of Work, Study & Research Abroad (2)

Provides an opportunity to examine social, cultural, and political challenges involved in working or living abroad. Students reflect on the knowledge, skills, and values gained while abroad, with attention to career-related pathways and possibilities. Topics include the complexities of cross-cultural engagement and ethical aspects of experiential learning in international settings. Graded as Pass/Fail (P/F). Prerequisite: This course will be open to any SFU student who has completed an international study, research, internship, or volunteership program.

IS 302 - Humanitarian Intervention: An Introduction (4)

Explores how international actors respond to humanitarian emergencies, such as famine, displacement, and genocide. Examines the political, legal, and ethical challenges of humanitarian action by focusing on contemporary cases and on key types of response, from the delivery of aid to sanctions and the use of military force. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

IS 307 - International Ethics: Poverty, Environmental Change, & War (4)

Examines ethical issues of global concern, with a focus on debates about poverty, environmental change, and armed conflict. Introduces students to relevant political and ethical theories, such as cosmopolitanism and nationalism, utilitarianism, theories of human rights, and ethics of care. Assesses various policy responses to these global challenges. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken IS 319 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

IS 309 - Special Topics in International Security and Conflict (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amyn Sajoo
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
D300 Amyn Sajoo
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
IS 310 - Gender and Security (4)

Examines security issues and events with attention to gender. Focuses on themes related to war, political violence, post-war reconstruction, militarism, military culture, and peace activism with attention to women and marginalised communities, gender norms, and feminist and queer approaches to rethinking security and imagining peace. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 319 - Special Topics in Comparative World Politics, Culture and Society (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Darren Byler
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
IS 329 - Special Topics in International Development, Economic and Environmental Issues (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Thompson
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
IS 355 - Refugees and Forced Migration (4)

Examines ideas and practices that affect experiences of forced migration and responses to these situations. What does it mean to live as a refugee? And what needs to change to alleviate the hardships and suffering of so many displaced people? Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken IS 329 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Aryan Karimi
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1530, Vancouver
IS 358 - Development, Aid and Difference in Historical Perspective (4)

Examines "International Development" within a series of historical frames, including the history of imperialism, the history of international relations, globalization, and the cultural and intellectual history of North-South relations. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have credit for HIST 358 may not take IS 358 for further credit.

or HIST 358 - Development, Aid and Difference in Historical Perspective (4)

Examines "International Development" within a series of historical frames, including the history of imperialism, the history of international relations, globalization, and the cultural and intellectual history of North-South relations. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students who have credit for IS 358 may not take HIST 358 for further credit.

IS 373 - Global Environmental Politics (4)

Examines international efforts to respond to global environmental challenges, such as climate change, deforestation, and the degradation of the oceans. Investigates obstacles to effective action and possible ways forward. Explores the role of a range of key actors, including states, intergovernmental organizations, multinational companies, NGOs, and social movements. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Joseph Dasovic
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2245, Vancouver
IS 409 - Special Topics I (4)

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 423 - International Development Practice and Ethics (4)

Critically considers why and how international development has been, and might be, pursued. Includes study of histories of development, theories of development, as well as policies, practices, different perspectives and outcomes of development. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken IS 429 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

IS 427 - Globalization, Poverty and Inequality (4)

Analyzes the origins and the economic consequences of globalization and the uneven process of economic development around the world in relation to poverty, by considering the measurement of poverty, its causes and dynamics, as well as public policy for poverty reduction. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 439 - Social Movements in the Global South (4)

Examines the nature, activities, and effects of social movements across the Global South. Uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore how social movements shape and respond to political, economic, and social transformation. Considers their relationship with political parties, states, and media and assesses the conditions under which movements emerge and succeed. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken IS 339, IS 329 or IS 419 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Sumercan Bozkurt-Gungen
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
SA 388 - Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples (A) (4)

In this intensive seminar, we compare political actions and social movements of indigenous peoples across several countries: analyze development of these movements over time; and discuss factors affecting the timing, reception, intensity and nature of these politics. Students write research papers on topics they develop. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

WL 100 - What is World Literature? (3)

Explores how texts travel beyond their cultures of origin, influence other cultural contexts and ideas, and become works of world literature. Introduces the concepts of cross-cultural literary criticism and translation. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Deggan
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3220, Burnaby
D101 Mark Deggan
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102 Mark Deggan
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
WL 201 - East/West Encounters (3)

Explores the relationship between Eastern and Western narratives. The focus may include the mutual influence of Eastern and Western cultural traditions and modernities, the construction of the 'East' in the West and of the 'West' in the East, theories of Orientalism and Occidentalism, and forms of East/West syncretism. This course may be repeated once for credit when different topics are offered. Breadth-Humanities.

WL 202 - North/South Intersections (3)

Investigates cross-cultural interactions between European or North American traditions and those of the "global South." May explore themes such as empire, globalization, and modernity, or examine how the artistic achievements of Africa, Oceania, Latin-America, or South Asia influence other traditions. This course may be repeated once for credit when different tonics are offered. Breadth-Humanities.

WL 303 - Global Culture and Its Discontents (4)

Explores the tendencies of globalization in the cultural realm, which while sparking cross-border communication, also tends to flatten identities into a coercive global norm. Focuses on writing in contexts of political oppression, digital communities, censorship, cultural displacement, terrorism and/or warfare. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

WL 309 - Empire and Resistance (4)

Juxtaposes the narratives of imperial conquest and colonial resistance. May focus on one particular imperial history or compare several. May feature narratives of rebellion and independence, national and/or postcolonial identity, or imperial nostalgia. This course may be repeated for credit when different topics are offered. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Up to six units of foreign language study, or French, may be used towards the Certificate.