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School of Sustainable Energy Engineering | Faculty of Applied Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2023

Sustainable Energy Engineering Major

Bachelor of Applied Science

This program, located at the Surrey campus, leads to a bachelor of applied science degree.

Admission Requirements

Admission is competitive. A supplemental application, along with related documentation, may be required for specific entry routes. For specific admission requirements, visit http://www.sfu.ca/students/admission/admission-requirements.html.

For more information, contact an Applied Sciences Advisor.

External Transfer from Another Post-Secondary Institution

Admission is competitive and all SFU General Requirements apply. For specific admission requirements, visit http://www.sfu.ca/students/admission/admission-requirements.html.

In addition to the general requirements, the following are required:

  • A minimum of 24 units of transferable coursework, including courses that are accepted by SFU as equivalents to the following:
  • One MATH course from: MATH 152, 232, or 240
  • One CMPT course from: CMPT 128, 130, 135, or (both CMPT 125 and 127)
  • One CHEM course from: CHEM 120, 121, or (CHEM 122 and CHEM 126)
  • One PHYS course from: PHYS 120, 121, 140, or 141
  • Meeting all SEE program high school admission requirements

A supplemental application, along with related documentation, may be required.

Internal Transfer from Another Simon Fraser University Program

Admission is competitive, with the following minimum requirements:

  • Minimum CGPA of 2.67
  • Enrollment in at least 12 units in the term prior to admission
  • No more than five repeats
  • Meeting all SEE program high school admission requirements

A supplemental application, along with related documentation, may be required.

Co-operative Education Work Experience

Every sustainable energy engineering student completes a three-term co-operative education program of practical experience in an appropriate industrial or research setting leading to a project under the technical direction of a practicing engineer or scientist. The goal is a complementary combination of work, in an industrial or research setting, and study. The placement may be within the university but in most cases the work site is off campus.

At least two of the three mandatory co-operative education terms must be completed in industry (SEE 290, 390, 490). Students may participate in additional co-op terms but are encouraged to seek diversity in their experience. The three mandatory co-op terms may include one special co-op term (SEE 294, 394, 494). Special co-op may include, but is not restricted to, self-directed, entrepreneurial, service or research co-op work terms. Permission of the Sustainable Energy Engineering Co-op Office is required.

Program Requirements

The following core courses are required for the sustainable energy engineering major and cannot be substituted for “equivalent” courses in other areas without prior approval. “Equivalent” courses taken without prior approval will not be applied to graduation requirements. Students should consult an academic advisor within their program for details on obtaining permission.

The program requires a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and an upper division grade point average (UDGPA) of at least 2.0 in accordance with university graduation requirements. A grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses is required to enroll in sustainable energy engineering courses.

Students complete all of

BUS 238 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3)

Students will build collaborative and creative skills necessary to become effective innovators through hands-on application via interdisciplinary teamwork. Entrepreneurship and innovation of all types will be addressed including social, commercial, creative, sustainable and technological perspectives. Prerequisite: 12 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 3170, Surrey
CMPT 130 - Introduction to Computer Programming I (3)

An introduction to computing science and computer programming, using a systems oriented language, such as C or C++. This course introduces basic computing science concepts. Topics will include: elementary data types, control structures, functions, arrays and strings, fundamental algorithms, computer organization and memory management. Prerequisite: BC Math 12 (or equivalent, or any of MATH 100, 150, 151, 154, or 157, with a minimum grade of C-). Students with credit for CMPT 102, 120, 128 or 166 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken CMPT 125, 129 or 135 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CMPT 135 - Introduction to Computer Programming II (3)

A second course in systems-oriented programming and computing science that builds upon the foundation set in CMPT 130 using a systems-oriented language such as C or C++. Topics: a review of the basic elements of programming; introduction to object-oriented programming (OOP); techniques for designing and testing programs; use and implementation of elementary data structures and algorithms; introduction to embedded systems programming. Prerequisite: CMPT 130 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CMPT 125, 126, or 129 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 152 - Calculus II (3)

Riemann sum, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite, indefinite and improper integrals, approximate integration, integration techniques, applications of integration. First-order separable differential equations and growth models. Sequences and series, series tests, power series, convergence and applications of power series. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151, with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 155 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alexander Rutherford
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 232 - Applied Linear Algebra (3)

Linear equations, matrices, determinants. Introduction to vector spaces and linear transformations and bases. Complex numbers. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization. Inner products and orthogonality; least squares problems. An emphasis on applications involving matrix and vector calculations. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or MACM 101, with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 154 or 157, both with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 240 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D400 Navpreet Kaur
Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 1002, Surrey
OP01 TBD
MATH 251 - Calculus III (3)

Rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Vectors, lines, planes, cylinders, quadric surfaces. Vector functions, curves, motion in space. Differential and integral calculus of several variables. Vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 152 with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 155 or MATH 158 with a grade of at least B. Recommended: It is recommended that MATH 240 or 232 be taken before or concurrently with MATH 251. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Hansol Park
Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D400 Justin Chan
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 5280, Surrey
OP01 TBD
OP02 TBD
MATH 260 - Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3)

First-order differential equations, second- and higher-order linear equations, series solutions, introduction to Laplace transform, systems and numerical methods, applications in the physical, biological and social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 152 with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 155 or 158, with a grade of at least B; MATH 232 or 240, with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for MATH 310 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephen Choi
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D102 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
D103 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
D104 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2830, Burnaby
D105 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D400 Justin Chan
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 5280, Surrey
D401 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2740, Surrey
D402 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2740, Surrey
PHYS 140 - Studio Physics - Mechanics and Modern Physics (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12, or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Students with credit for PHYS 125 or 120 or 101 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

PHYS 141 - Studio Physics - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 or PHYS 125 or PHYS 140, with a minimum grade of C-, or PHYS 101 with a minimum grade of B. Corequisite: MATH 152 or MATH 155. Students with credit for PHYS 126 or 121 or 102 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

REM 350 - Energy Management for a Sustainable Climate and Society (4)

An interdisciplinary approach to transforming energy systems in pursuit of sustainable climate and society. Perspectives include thermodynamics, resource potentials, technological potentials, economic evaluation, implementation of transformative public policies, political-economy assessment of policy constraints, national and sub-national governance options, behavioural change potentials, global diplomacy, and pursuit of greater equity within and between countries. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SEE 100 - Engineering Graphics and Software for Design (3)

Introduction to graphical communication in the context of engineering design. Students learn to think and communicate visually. With the use of computer aided design (CAD) tools, students learn the theory and practice of design by dissecting, graphically representing, and redesigning products. Students with credit for MSE 100 or IAT 106 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 101W - Process, Form and Convention in Professional Genres (3)

Fundamentals of communicating technical information clearly and concisely for professional engineers. A focus on communicating persuasively about various contemporary technical, social, ethical and environmental issues with technical and non-technical audiences. Students will practice providing constructive feedback to peers, giving presentations and working in a team. Students with credit for CMPT 105W, ENSC 102, ENSC 105W, or MSE 101W may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

SEE 110 - Energy, Environment and Society (3)

Energy availability and sources, environmental consequences of energy supply and consumption, and societal impacts. Explores the environmental, economic, social, and political implications of the choices a society makes to meet its energy needs. Definitions of sustainability. Special emphasis on communication skills.

SEE 111 - Integrated Energy Solution I (4)

Introduction to the process of sustainable engineering design. Historical perspective on role of energy, resources and technology in society. Development and demonstration of sustainability thinking through research, case study and design project undertaken by teams of students with integration of socio-economic factors and planning. Course introduces Project Based Learning methods. Prerequisite: SEE 110.

SEE 221 - Statics and Mechanics of Materials (4)

Introduction to solid mechanics including statics, stress, strain, and deformation. Equilibrium conditions, axial loading, torsional loading, pure bending, stresses and deflections in rods and beams. Prerequisite: PHYS 140, MATH 152. Students with credit for ENSC 281, MSE 221, or ENSC 385 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
D101 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 1034, Surrey
LA02 Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 1034, Surrey
LA03 Tu 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 1034, Surrey
SEE 222 - Engineering Materials for Energy Systems (3)

Introduction to engineering materials by control of their structures to achieve different properties and performance. Techniques for modern materials engineering practice. Covers crystal and non-crystal structures and instruments for structure determination; principles of material failure, polymers, ceramics, nano-materials, and composites; electronic materials, and electro-chemical energy materials; quality control and reliability. Prerequisite: PHYS 140, CHEM 121 or (CHEM 122 and CHEM 126). Students with credit for MSE 220 or ENSC 330 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 224 - Thermodynamics for Energy Engineering (3)

Basic energy concepts and definitions; first and second laws of thermodynamics; ideal and real gases; thermodynamic properties; with emphasis on analysis and applications to energy systems engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 251.

SEE 225 - Fluid Mechanics (4)

The fundamentals of fluid mechanics for engineers, emphasizing the basics of fluid statics and fluid motion, with applications in energy system engineering. Prerequisite: PHYS 140, MATH 251, (MATH 260 or MATH 310). Students with credit for ENSC 283 or MSE 223 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 230 - Electric Circuits (4)

Fundamental elements of electrical circuits; circuits laws; series and parallel circuits; operational amplifiers; network theorems; nodal and mesh methods; analysis of natural and step response of first and second order circuits; real, reactive and rms power. Covers worker safety implications of electricity, and safety of common laboratory practices such as soldering. Prerequisite: PHYS 141, MATH 232. Corequisite: (MATH 260 or MATH 310). Students with credit for ENSC 220 or MSE 250 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tu, Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 1036, Surrey
LA02 Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 1036, Surrey
LA03 We 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 1036, Surrey
SEE 231 - Electronic Devices and Systems (4)

Analysis of the basic electronic components, amplifiers, diodes, semiconductors, transistors and MOSFETs. Introduction to specific instrumentation, including actuators and sensors. Design of electronic circuits based on real world scenarios. Prerequisite: SEE 230. Students with credit for MSE 251 or ENSC 225 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 241 - Measurement, Analysis and Forecasting (3)

An introduction to methods for collecting and analysing engineering data. Topics include engineering data representation, probability density functions, engineering measurements, error analysis, test of hypotheses, regression, and design of experiments. Prerequisite: PHYS 141, MATH 232. Corequisite: MATH 251. Students with credit for ENSC 280 and MSE 210 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 Tu 10:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
LA02 Fr 3:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
SEE 242 - Computational Methods for Engineers (3)

Apply numerical methods to solve engineering problems with an emphasis on sustainable energy engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 152, MATH 232. Students with credit for MSE 211 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 251 - Electric Machines and Energy Conversion (3)

Principles, operation, and analysis of electromechanical energy conversion systems and their applications. Prerequisite: SEE 230, SEE 221, (MATH 260 or MATH 310).

SEE 300 - The Business of Engineering (3)

Economic and entrepreneurial concepts important to engineers who manage projects, run businesses, or need to decide on the most efficient method for accomplishing a task. Topics include: financial accounting and metrics, economic equivalence, rates of return, depreciation, income taxes, project and cost-benefit analyses, capital budgeting, financing methods, risk and uncertainty, business plans. Prerequisite: A minimum of 75 units. Students with credit for MSE 300 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
SRYE 3016, Surrey
D101 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SEE 310 - Integrated Energy Solution II (4)

Integrated design methodology for sustainable engineering problems; implementation through an energy system project undertaken in a project based learning environment. Introduction to modelling, simulation and optimization of energy systems. Global and local regulatory and policy frameworks. Demonstration of integrated sustainability thinking through design project, report and presentation. Special emphasis on communication skills. Prerequisite: Completion of one co-op work term; SEE 251, 224, 242.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
D101 Mo 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
LA01 Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
SEE 324 - Heat and Mass Transfer for Energy Engineering (3)

Introduces the basic principles of heat and mass transfer with analysis and application to real-world sustainable energy systems. Prerequisite: PHYS 141, SEE 224, SEE 225.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 We 3:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYE 1046, Surrey
LA02 Fr 3:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYE 1046, Surrey
SEE 331 - Power Electronics (4)

Introduction to the fundamentals of power electronic circuits, components, and operation, and principles of electric power conversion in DC and AC applications. Prerequisite: SEE 231 and SEE 251. Students with credit for MSE 353 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 We 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
LA02 We 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
LA03 Th 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
SEE 332 - Power Systems Analysis and Design (3)

Interconnected power systems including generators, transformers, electric motors and transmission lines; active and reactive power flow; symmetrical components; symmetrical and unsymmetrical short circuit fault calculations; protection systems, circuit breakers, transient stability, and grid voltage and frequency control. Labs, field trips and projects related to power grid operation, control, and design. Prerequisite: SEE 251, SEE 331.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 Mo 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
LA02 Th 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
SEE 341 - Signals and Systems (3)

Modelling and analysis of continuous and discrete signals using linear techniques. Laplace transforms; methods for basic modelling of physical systems; discrete and continuous convolution; impulse and step response; transfer functions and filtering; continuous Fourier transform and its relationship to the Laplace transform; frequency response and Bode plots; sampling; Z-transform. Prerequisite: SEE 242, SEE 230. Students with credit for MSE 280 or ENSC 380 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 We 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
LA02 We 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
SEE 342 - Feedback Control Systems (4)

Fundamentals of feedback control system design and analysis, including practical and theoretical aspects. Significant lab component in which students design controllers and evaluate their robustness to modeling errors and nonlinearities. Prerequisite: SEE 341. Students with credit for ENSC 383 or MSE 381 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 1036, Surrey
LA02 Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 1036, Surrey
SEE 351 - Bioprocess Engineering Systems (3)

Combines biotechnology and engineering for materials and energy harvesting from renewable feedstocks. Covers fundamental biomolecular research on proteins, enzymes, microbes, biosensors, bioseparations and bioreactors. Applications in food processing preservation; biofuel; air and wastewater treatment; supramolecular materials for solar energy/photosynthesis; microfluidics for bioreactors; DNA chips; bioenergy; bio fuel cells; pulp/paper. Prerequisite: (MATH 260 or MATH 310), and SEE 224. Corequisite: SEE 324.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SRYE 4016, Surrey
SRYE 4016, Surrey
LA01 Mo 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 2024, Surrey
LA02 Tu 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 2024, Surrey
LA03 We 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 2024, Surrey
LA04 Th 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 2024, Surrey
LA05 Fr 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SRYE 2024, Surrey
SEE 352 - Applied Thermodynamics and Energy Conversion (3)

Application of thermodynamics, chemistry, and transport physics to energy conversion technologies and systems. Analysis of energy conversion systems with emphasis on efficiency, performance, and environmental impact. Prerequisite: SEE 222, SEE 224, SEE 331.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 2016, Surrey
SRYE 2016, Surrey
LA01 Mo 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 1046, Surrey
LA02 Th 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 1046, Surrey
SEE 354 - Energy Storage (3)

The characteristics, applications, limitations, and environmental impacts of various energy storage technologies and techniques are analyzed, compared and implemented in a lab setting. Electrochemical, mechanical, thermal and emerging energy storage options are considered. Prerequisite: SEE 222, SEE 331, SEE 324.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 2016, Surrey
SRYE 2016, Surrey
LA01 Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
LA02 Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 1040, Surrey
SEE 402 - Professional Engineering Ethics and Practice (2)

An introduction to the engineering profession, law and ethics, and the engineers' responsibility to society. Students will explore issues related to worker and public safety and the social implications and environmental impacts of engineering. Includes how to successfully negotiate the transition to the next career stage. Special emphasis on communication skills. Prerequisite: Minimum of 100 units; SEE 110. Students with credit for ENSC 406 or MSE 402 may not take this course for further credit.

SEE 410W - Sustainable Energy Design Project I (3)

This is the first course in a team-based, two-course capstone sequence. Focuses on project management, technical writing skills, and teamwork skills and strategies within the context of an engineering design project. Documentation topics cover proposals, functional and design specifications, progress reports and user manuals. An interim project report and presentation is required. SEE 411 must be taken in the term directly following the successful completion of SEE 410W. Grades awarded in SEE 410W are conditional on the successful completion of SEE 411 in the subsequent term. Prerequisite: 100 units; 2 completed co-op terms; SEE 100, SEE 101W, SEE 310. SEE students cannot take MSE 410, MSE 411, ENSC 405W or ENSC 440 for credit. Writing.

SEE 411 - Sustainable Energy Systems Design Project (3)

This is the second course in the team-based, two-course capstone sequence. Students synthesize their learning across the SEE program to research, design, build and test the hardware implementation of a working system. Includes a shop training workshop, engineering standards on how to design for safety, and human factors. A final report and presentation is required. Prerequisite: SEE 410W. Must be taken in the term immediately following 410W. In order to obtain credit, students must successfully complete both SEE 410W and SEE 411. SEE students cannot take MSE 410, MSE 411, ENSC 405W or ENSC 440 for credit.

and one of

SEE 325 - Mechanical Design and Finite Element Analysis (3)

Introduction and application of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to energy systems design problems involving engineering mechanics, heat transfer and machine elements. Includes an introduction to commercial FEA software and applications to practical problems. Concepts relating to engineering mechanics and machine elements are developed in the context of design projects. Prerequisite: SEE 100, SEE 221, and SEE 324.

SEE 333 - Network and Communication Systems (3)

Fundamentals of communication networks: reference models, layered architecture. Physical layer analysis and design. Performance analysis of communication protocols at the data link, network, and transport layers. Medium access control, congestion control, routing. Network security, privacy, and social issues. Tools for simulation and analysis of communication networks. Prerequisite: SEE 341.

and one of

MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 MacKenzie Carr
Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101 Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
D102 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
D103 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

and either

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 with a minimum grade of C, or CHEM 109 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 120 or 125 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rebecca Goyan
Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D102 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D103 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D104 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D105 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D106 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D107 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D108 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D109 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D110 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D111 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D112 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D200 James Zhou
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D201 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D202 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D203 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D204 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
LA04 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LA06 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB04 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LB06 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7079, Burnaby
LC01 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2780, Surrey
LC02 We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2780, Surrey
LE01 TBD
LE02 TBD

or

CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II (2)

Chemical equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry should take CHEM 122 concurrently with CHEM 126. Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 124 or CHEM 180 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Li
Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D102 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D103 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D104 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D105 Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D106 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D107 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D108 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5005, Burnaby
D109 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D110 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
and CHEM 126 - General Chemistry Laboratory II (2)

Experiments in chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, qualitative analysis, electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 122. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
LA04 M Khaled Arafeh
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
LA06 M Khaled Arafeh
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby

Within their program, students must also complete technical, interdisciplinary and complementary studies electives as indicated below.

Elective Courses

Technical Elective Courses

Students must complete three technical elective courses from the following SEE Technical Elective list. With permission from the SEE undergraduate curriculum committee chair, students may replace one technical elective with either a directed study (SEE 486) or a special project laboratory course. Approved special topics courses may also be counted here.

ENSC 450 - VLSI Systems Design (4)

An introduction to the design of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits and systems (System-on-Chip, SoC) using mainly CMOS technology. SoC design techniques and applications will be covered. Basic topics will include: CMOS technology and circuit layout rules; combinational and sequential logic; logic simulation; systems design; design for verification and testability; and embedded-processor design and application. An advanced digital design flow based on the VHDL hardware description language will be introduced and exercised in the labs. Prerequisite: (ENSC 225 or ENSC 226 or MSE 251) and ENSC 350, all with a minimum grade of C- and a minimum of 80 units.

ENSC 495 - Introduction to Microelectronic Fabrication (4)

Lectures provide the theory of integrated circuit fabrication. Students fabricate diodes, transistors and test structures in the laboratory. Topics: clean room practice, thermal oxidation and diffusion, photolithography, thin film deposition, etching, ion implantation, packaging, CMOS and bipolar processes. Prerequisite: ENSC 225 or ENSC 226 or MSE 251 or PHYS 365, with a minimum grade of C- and permission of the instructor and a minimum of 80 units. Enrollment in this course is by application only.

MSE 480 - Manufacturing Systems (3)

An introduction to manufacturing systems: industrial robotics, manufacturing system components and definitions, material handling systems, production lines, assembly systems, robotic cell design, cellular manufacturing, flexible manufacturing systems, quality control, manufacturing support systems. Prerequisite: MSE 310 (or ENSC 387)and a minimum of 80 credits. Students with credit for ENSC 432 may not take MSE 480 for further credit.

MSE 481 - Industrial Control Systems (3)

Examines modern industrial control systems and applications. Topics include: review of industrial sensors and actuators; computer interfacing; ladder logic and programmable logic controllers; industrial computer and programming methods; industrial networks; human-machine interfaces; supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA); manufacturing execution systems; and enterprise-wide integration. Prerequisite: MSE 352 (or ENSC 252) and MSE 381 (or ENSC 383) and a minimum of 80 credits. Students with credit for ENSC 484 may not take MSE 481 for further credit.

SEE 460 - Additive Manufacturing and Sustainable Design (3)

Additive manufacturing processes; Design for additive manufacturing; Problem-based additive manufacturing, Project-based additive manufacturing; Light-based 3D printing, Metal 3D printing. Extrusion-based 3D printing; 3D printed electronics; Direct digital manufacturing; 4D printing. Prerequisite: SEE 100, SEE 221, SEE 222.

SEE 461 - Electronics Manufacturing and Assembly (3)

Electronics manufacturing and assembly technologies and processes in the context of sustainability. PCB and interconnect technologies, component selection and handling, material properties and selection, thermal, mechanical and environmental effects, product testing, environmental and legal standards. Prerequisite: SEE 221, SEE 231.

SEE 462 - Manufacturing Processes and Materials (3)

Manufacturing processes and Engineering materials in the context of sustainable manufacturing. Manufacturing technologies and process flow. Productivity and green manufacturing practices. Engineering material selection. Manufacturing processes including forming, separating, fabrication, conditioning and finishing. Prerequisite: SEE 221, SEE 310.

SEE 463 - Embedded Computer Systems (3)

Implementation and design of embedded computer systems used in various real-time applications including energy systems, power electronics, and automation. Prerequisite: CMPT 130, SEE 231.

SEE 464 - Energy Systems Modeling for Buildings (3)

Introduction to modeling energy systems for buildings, focusing on envelope and mechanical systems, and their effects on energy use. Using the applicable codes and standards to define schedules for the buildings, calculate heating and cooling loads, and set sustainability targets. Applying industry standard software to model, and experiment with innovative methods to enhance energy use, and reach sustainability targets. Prerequisite: SEE 310 and SEE 324. MSE students who completed MSE 321 can take this course upon approval of the course instructor.

SEE 475 - Special Topics in Sustainable Energy Engineering (3)

Special topics in sustainable energy engineering. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: Permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Vincenzo Pecunia
We, Fr 3:30 PM – 4:50 PM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
LA01 We 12:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 1036, Surrey
SEE 476 - Special Topics in Sustainable Energy Engineering (3)

Special topics in sustainable energy engineering. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: Permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.

SEE 477 - Special Topics in Sustainable Energy Engineering (3)

Special topics in sustainable energy engineering. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: Permission of the undergraduate curriculum chair.

Interdisciplinary Elective Courses

To contribute to the program's focus on interdisciplinary knowledge, students must also take one of the following interdisciplinary electives

GEOG 324 - Geography of Transportation (4)

An empirical and theoretical examination of the geographical aspects of transportation systems. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 362 - Gentrification and Urban Change (4)

Contemporary cases and conceptualizations of gentrification and related processes of urban change. Central themes include: political, economic, social, and cultural manifestations of gentrification; class, gender, and racialization; the role of development, planning, architecture, the arts, and resistance movements; and gentrification’s global geographies. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100. Students with credit for GEOG 362W may not take this course for further credit.

Complementary Studies Elective Courses

The Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) requires that one complementary studies elective within the SEE curriculum meet the requirements for classification as a Central Issues, Methodologies, and Thought Processes course. Within the SEE curriculum, the course BUS 238 – Introduction to Entrepreneurship & Innovation, meets this requirement.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

WQB Requirement Modifications for Sustainable Energy Engineering

For students in the Sustainable Energy Engineering program, the total number of Breadth-Social Sciences (B-Soc) and Breadth-Humanities (B-Hum) courses is reduced to nine units (three courses), with at least three units (one course) in each category.

As the curriculum already requires two B-Soc designated courses (BUS 238 and REM 350), students need only take one Breadth-Humanities course, in addition to the required and elective courses indicated above, in order to complete the university breadth and SEE complementary studies requirement.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Please see Faculty of Applied Sciences Residency Requirements for further information.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.