The Love Your Brain campaign and materials have been adapted with permission from UBC Student Housing and Hospitality Services.

Cannabis at SFU

October 17th, 2018 marked cannabis legalization in Canada. Cannabis use is a personal choice, but it comes with risks and restrictions on campus.

What are the active components of cannabis?

THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the main psychoactive component and is most responsible for the “high” associated with cannabis use. Another cannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD). Higher-strength or more powerful cannabis products (such as products with a high THC content) are worse for your health.

Faculty and staff

SFU has a commitment to a “supportive and healthy work environment” as outlined in the strategic vision and recognizes the impact of cannabis legalization on the health and safety of SFU employees.

Learn before you use

Consider avoiding cannabis if:

  • You are under 25. The risk of long-term effects is greater
  • You have a personal or family history of psychosis
  • You are pregnant

y Refusing is okay

Prepare a few stock phrases – as simple as “no thanks” or “I am finished for tonight” works. Be polite, but firm, and repeat as necessary.

y Pace yourself

It’s hard to know how much of the active component of cannabis you’re consuming, so start small and take it slow. Keep in mind that using frequently may increase harm to your physical and mental health. 

y Avoid mixing

Mixing cannabis with alcohol, tobacco, and/or other drugs can significantly alter the impact it has on you.

y Plan it out

Think safe contexts. Stay in the company of friends, and make sure you can access safe transportation home.

Concentration, memory, and IQ may be impacted long-term by frequent cannabis use.

Your brain feels the love when you’re smart about cannabis use.

Restrictions on Campus

Cannabis smoking on Burnaby campus is temporarily permitted at two temporary designated cannabis-specific outdoor smoking areas, separate from those in use for smoking tobacco. These locations can be found here.

Vancouver and Surrey campuses will not have designated cannabis smoking locations as these campuses are located in urban centres dictated by municipal regulations.

Where can I smoke cannabis on campus?

Cannabis smoking on Burnaby campus is temporarily permitted at two temporary designated cannabis-specific outdoor smoking areas, separate from those in use for smoking tobacco. These locations can be found here. Vancouver and Surrey campuses will not have designated cannabis smoking locations as these campuses are located in urban centres dictated by municipal regulations.

Why is SFU permitting cannabis use on campus?

A harm reduction strategy based on education about risks is preferred rather than complete prohibition.

What are the risks of cannabis use?

Effects of cannabis impairment include dizziness, impaired memory, weakened motor skills and disorientation. People who use cannabis regularly can develop psychological and/or physical dependence. The risk of long term effects of cannabis are greater if you are under the age of 25.

Does this mean it’s okay for students to be high in class?

No, each student is expected to abide by the Code of Academic Integrity and Good Behaviour.

 

Can students and staff possess cannabis on campus?

Yes, as long as they are over 19, as the law states.

Can I grow cannabis in my room in Residence?

No, as per the SFU Residence and Housing Handbook cannabis cultivation is not permitted in residence or on residence property.

What if people use cannabis at SFU and then want to drive a vehicle?

Drug impaired driving is against the law. See Government of Canada - Don’t Drive High >

Is all non-medical cannabis from various stores or outlets legal?

No, legal cannabis has a BC specific excise stamp and can only be purchased through a government operated store or online via BC Cannabis Stores.

Can I travel to the US or internationally with cannabis?

No. It is illegal to take cannabis across the Canadian border. It doesn’t matter whether you’re leaving or entering Canada, or what the laws are in your destination country. 

The Love Your Brain campaign and materials have been adapted with permission from UBC Student Housing and Hospitality Services.