UNDERGRADUATE MINOR
Development and Sustainability

OVERVIEW

This minor program explores various aspects of global sustainability that arise from the complex relationship between development and the environment, including discussion of practice and policy issues in relation to problem-solving and examination of thematic areas at various scales (local to global) that enhance the quality of life.  Themes may include:  Global South-Global North relations; environmental justice; biodiversity; food security; sustainable economic development; and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  

Admission 

Interested students may declare this Minor through the Sustainable Development Program Advisor in the Faculty of Environment: sdinfo@sfu.ca.  Program entry requires completion of 30 lower division units. Students must also be in good standing in their major program's home department.

Students may take SD courses without applying for the minor and may apply SD courses and approved electives completed prior to admission already taken toward the minor.

Program Requirements (Fall 2018)

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete:

SD 281 – Sustainable Communities, Sustainable World (3)

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete:

SD 301 – Building a Sustainable World: Concepts and Cases (4)

SD 401 – Sustainable Development Goals Studio (4)

and 8 units chosen from the following list of electives:

Sustainable Development

SD 381 – Building Sustainable Communities: Concepts and Cases (4)

SD 481 – Sustainable Communities Leadership Lab (4)

SD 499 – Special Topics in Sustainable Development (4)

Archaeology

ARCH 365 – Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

ARCH 377 – Historical Archaeology (5)

ARCH 385 – Paleoanthropology (5)

ARCH 386 – Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Communication

CMNS 342 – Science and Public Policy: Risk Communication (4)

CMNS 346 – Development Communication (4)

CMNS 347 – Communication in Conflict and Intervention (4)

CMNS 356 – Communication to Mitigate Disasters (4)

CMNS 388 – Special Topics in Communication (4)

CMNS 425 – Applied Communication for Social Issues (4)

CMNS 426 – Video Design for Social Communication (4)

CMNS 444 – Political Economy of International Communication (4)

CMNS 446 – Communication, Science and Technology (4)

CMNS 447 – Negotiation and Dialogue as Communication (4)

Economics

ECON 355W – Economic Development (4)

Education

EDUC 311 – Foundations in Aboriginal Education, Language, and Culture (3)

EDUC 370 – International and Intercultural Education (4)

EDUC 435 – Infusing Global Perspectives into Curriculum (4)

EDUC 441 – Multicultural and Anti-racist Education (4)

EDUC 452 – Environmental Education (8)

First Nations Studies

FNST 332 – Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations (3)

FNST 383 – Indigenous Technology: Art and Sustainability (4)

FNST 401 – Aboriginal Peoples and Public Policy (3)

FNST 403 – Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World (3)

FNST 433 – Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Geography

GEOG 321 – Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

GEOG 322 – World Resources (4)

GEOG 324 – Geography of Transportation (4)

GEOG 325 – Geographies of Consumption (4)

GEOG 327 – Geography of Tourism (4)

GEOG 383 – Regional Development and Planning (4)

GEOG 389W – Nature and Society (4)

Health Sciences

HSCI 308 – Sickness and Wealth: Health in Global Perspective (3)

HSCI 340 – Social Determinants of Health (3)

HSCI 406 – Global Perspectives in Indigenous Health (3)

HSCI 412 – Health Communication (3)

HSCI 431 – The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic (3)

History

HIST 322 – Atlantic and Pacific Migration (4)

HIST 363 – History of Technology (4)

HIST 377 – Environmental History (4)

HIST 427 – Problems in the History of Aboriginal Peoples (4)

HIST 432 – Problems in Environmental History (4)

HIST 458W – Problems in Latin American Regional History (4)

HIST 459W – Problems in the Political and Social History of Latin America (4)

Humanities

HUM 325 – The Humanities and the Natural World (4)

International Studies

IS 303 – Ethnic Minorities, Identity Politics, and Conflict in Southeast Asia (4)

IS 313W – Nationalism, Democracy and Development in Modern India (4)

IS 314 – National, Regional, and International Politics in Southeast Asia (4)

IS 358 – Development, Aid and Difference in Historical Perspective (4)

IS 409 – Special Topics I (4)

IS 410 – Politics, Institutions and Development (4)

IS 412 – Central Asia: Democracy, Development and Conflicts (4)

IS 419 – Special Topics II (4)

IS 429 – Special Topics III (4)

IS 421 – The Economics of International Organizations and Development (4)

IS 435 - Special Topics in Latin American Studies (4)

Political Science

POL 342 – Developing Countries in Global Politics (4)

POL 343 – Global Political Economy (4)

POL 346 – International Organization (4)

POL 373 – Human Security (4)

POL 374 – Africa in the Global Political Economy (4)

POL 446W – International Relations in East Asia (4)

POL 447 – Theories of Global Political Economy (4)

Resource and Environmental Management

REM 311 – Applied Ecology and Sustainable Environments (3)

REM 350 – Sustainable Energy and Materials Management (4)

REM 356 – Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

REM 370 – Global Resource Issues in Oceanography (3)

REM 445 – Environmental Risk Assessment (3)

REM 454 – Water Security (4)

Sociology and Anthropology

SA 302W – Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

SA 316 – Tourism and Social Policy (SA) (4)

SA 326 – Ecology and Social Thought (4)

SA 363 – Process of Development and Underdevelopment (SA) (4)

SA 371 – The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

SA 396 – Selected Regional Areas (SA) (4)

SA 418 – International Health: Global Policies and Local Realities (A) (4)

SA 429 – Sex, Work, and International Capital (SA) (4)

SA 430 – States, Cultures and Global Transitions (SA) (4)

Limits

It is generally possible to combine two or more programs of study within a single degree. The following combinations are common; all require completion of a minimum of 44 upper division units.

Major-minor programs, consisting of the major requirements of one subject and the minor requirements of another subject within the framework of a single degree.

Double-minor programs, consisting of the minor requirements of each of two subjects within a single degree.

Combined programs require that the minimum upper division unit requirements of each program be separately satisfied. Even if a course is common to the content requirements of two programs, it may only be counted towards the upper division unit requirements of one of the programs. In such cases, course substitutions towards upper division credit of the other program(s) must be approved by the relevant program chair(s).