Semester in Dialogue 2016 brochure

Semester in Dialogue 2016 brochure

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Upcoming Course(s)

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Applications open until Friday, October 21, 2016.


Spring 2017

Decolonizing Dialogues, Solidarities, and Activism

Full-time, 15 credits (DIAL 390W, 391W, 392W)

Governments, organizations and individuals in Canada are mobilizing around the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action to change Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples. But what does “reconciliation” actually entail?  And what does it mean to live on Indigenous lands? 

We welcome students from different backgrounds and with different levels of experience to engage in deep discussions about the present moment in Indigenous-non-Indigenous relations. Through a series of dialogues with Indigenous peoples as well as activists, allies, academics, and others who are supporting Indigenous resurgence, course participants will consider what decolonization means at individual and collective levels. 

The course will use pedagogies that invite holistic understandings and embrace complexities. Experiential learning, visits with Indigenous communities, thought leaders, dialogue invitees, and reading reflections as well as individual and group projects will help course participants to identify how the personal and the political, the local and the global intersect their own identities and their relationships with Indigenous peoples. 

We will also consider questions of alliances and solidarities, as well as the opportunities and tensions in relation to action. Values of responsibility, respect and reciprocity will guide our exploration of how we might construct ethical activist practice based on decolonizing and transformative learning. 

About the course facilitators:

Lynne Davis lived in Vancouver in the early 1980s and is an Associate Professor at Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario in the Indigenous Studies Department. She is on sabbatical in 2017 and was invited to co-teach this course. Lynne’s most recent teaching is on Indigenous and International Community Development; Indigenous-Non-Indigenous Alliances for Social and Environmental Justice; and Transforming Settler Consciousness.

Sean Blenkinsop is a regular course leader in the Semester in Dialogue program. He is an environmental educator and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education at SFU, with special assignment to the Semester in Dialogue Program.