School Highlights

Feb 23+24, 2018  SFU School of Public Policy will host the 2018 IPAC/CAPPA National Policy Administration Case Competition for Masters students - the first time it's being held in Western Canada.

November 1 and 22 Presentations in our Policy Spotlight Seminar Series by First Nations Health Authority and EcoTrust Canada.  

August 15  MPP 2017 graduate Sarah Griffiths received 2nd place honours in the IPAC CAPPA National Student Thought Leadership Award competition held in Charlottetown, PEI.  Sarah presented on the topic of her Capstone research thesis - Where Home Meets Hotel: Regulating tourist accommodations in the age of Airbnb

May 29  SPP Faculty member and former director, Nancy Olewiler is this year's recipient of the YWCA Women of Distinction Award in the Education, Training and Development category.  Recognized nationally as one of Canada's most prestigious awards for women, the YWCA Vancouver Women of Distinction Awards honour women whose outstanding achievements contribute to the well-being and future of our community.See Award Photo

April 19 MPP students organized the first Policy Student Showcase featuring research posters related to Capstone and BC Priorities projects. Guests included alumni, Co-op supervisors, faculty, prospective students and others in the SFU Vancouver community.

February 21  2nd year student Hope Caldi was selected as the winner of the 2017 Blueprint 2020 National Student Paper Competition sponsored by the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) and the Institute of Public Administration Canada (IPAC).  As one of five finalists, Hope presented to a panel of Deputy Ministers based on her paper, Offering a Warmer, Wiser Welcome: Recommendations for Reforming Canada's Immigration Loan Program, which was selected on the basis of its originality, research, clarity, significance, and relevance to the Government of Canada and the public service.


 

 

Connor Hasegawa, Chris Kylleso, Lucas Neufeld, Twyla Smith
Connor Hasegawa, Chris Kylleso, Lucas Neufeld, Twyla Smith
 

Recent Research

HIV and the Criminalization of drug use among people who inject drugs: a systematic review by Kora DeBeck et al. Lancet HIV. 2017 Aug;4(8):e357-e374.

Seeing the Problem through the Trees: Policy Options for Improving Retention of Old Growth in Central Walbran by MPP students Jay Barban, Matthew Jackson, Sydney Jordan, Matt Mayers and Rachel Spence in conjunction with the Sierra Club of BC.  This research work was conducted as part of the School's BC Priorities Project program addressing current policy issues in BC.

In high demand: Addressing the demand factors behind Toronto's housing affordability problem by Josh Gordon, was commissioned by the Ryerson City Building Institute to contribute to the housing affordability debate in Toronto. It shows that the primary determinants of Toronto’s high housing prices lie on the demand side, and that the element of foreign investment has been under-appreciated by various public authorities to this point. It argues that the case for supply-side reform is overstated and would not address the immediate challenges facing the city.

Opportunities in Transition - an Economic Analysis of Investing in Youth Aging out of Care by Marvin Shaffer and Lynell Anderson in conjunction with Fostering Change and Vancouver Foundation.

Vancouver’s Housing Affordability Crisis: Causes, Consequences and Solutions by J.C. Gordon  Executive Summary and Full Report

 

In the News

August 21, 2017 Op-ed by Asst. Professor Kora DeBeck and Julio Montaner Don't criminilize people on HIV treatment in Globe & Mail.

August 4, 2017 Article by Asst Professor Kora DeBeck and Julio Montaner To win the fight against AIDS, we must end the war on drugs in Macleans.

July 14, 2017 Op-ed by Professors Rhys Kesselman and John Richards Real world guidance for BC's proposed $10-a-day child care plans  in Vancouver Sun.

July 28, 2017 Op-ed by 2017 MPP graduate Kirk Hepburn and professor John Richards  Most Bangladesh factories are still unsafe, and consumers should not feel comfortable in the Globe & Mail.