Spring 2016 - HIST 215 D100

The Making of the British Isles (3)

Class Number: 4111

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    SSCC 9002, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 23, 2016
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    AQ 3149, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A broad survey of some of the central developments that have shaped the history of the British Isles from Roman antiquity to the present. Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course provides a broad survey of the social, cultural and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from pre-Roman times (before the 1st century BCE) to the 20th century. The central political-historical problem of the course is the expansion of English power over the isles through imperial conquest, in time forging a single, unified state encompassing England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. We also will explore social transformations, asking how people experienced village, family, work, land, and war differently over time. In the realm of culture, we will trace the decline of magic and the rise of religion, the impact of the Protestant Reformation, and later the influence of industrial change on British ways of knowing and communicating.

Grading

  • Tutorial Participation 20%
  • Midterm exam 25%
  • Primary Source Analyses 20%
  • Final exam 35%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

The Oxford History of Britain, Kenneth O. Morgan, Ed. (978-0199579259)

Frances and Joseph Gies, Life in a Medieval Village (978-0060920463)

George Orwell, The Road to Wigan Pier (978-0156767507)

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS