Spring 2016 - HSCI 130 D100

Foundations of Health Science (4)

Class Number: 4329

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    WMC 3520, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

How health, illness and disease are defined and measured for individuals and populations. Research strategies used to identify how health, illness and disease are distributed across human populations and how environmental, socio-economic, demographic, biological, behavioural and political factors influence individual and population health. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course will explore how health, illness and disease are defined and measured for individuals and populations. Research strategies used to identify how health, illness and disease are distributed across human populations and how environmental, socio-economic, demographic, biological, behavioural and political factors influence individual and population health.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

To help students develop a better understanding of public health and health sciences.

Grading

  • Tutorial participation/ presentation 15%
  • In class exercises 20%
  • Quiz one and two 50%
  • Book review (in class) 15%

REQUIREMENTS:

By the end of the course, students will be able to understand: (1) the concepts of health, illness and disease and how these constructs have varied across cultures and historical periods; (2) the terminology used to describe and measure patterns of health illness and disease in public health; (3) the social determinants of health and imagine how we might build health public policy and promote the health of the population; (4) specific health issues (e.g. sanitation, infectious diseases and rise of public health, the origin of HIV/AIDS, and climate change); and (5) health literacy and how to convey your health message using art.

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

None

REQUIRED READING:

Greenwood M, Leeuw S, Lindsay NM, Reading C, (eds.). Determinants of Indigenous Peoples' Health in Canada Beyond the Social, Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2015

Students must also read and review one of three books:
(1) George R. The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2008;
(2) Timberg C and Halperin D. Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally Overcome It. New York: Penguin Press, 2012; or
(3) Johnson, S. The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How it Changed Science, Cities and the Modern World. New York: Riverhead Books, 2006.

All other articles are available online through Canvas or open access websites

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS