Spring 2017 - HSCI 333 D100

Red, Hot, and True: A Semester of Blood (3)

Class Number: 4335

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    BLU 10021, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 19, 2017
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    SSCC 9002, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    60 units and completion of one of: HSCI 100, BISC 100, BISC 101 or BISC 102 with a minimum grade of C-.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Examines blood via biological, laboratory/clinical, societal, and symbolic contexts and the interplay of those contexts. The dynamic interactions of blood at multiple levels in our bodies and between people reveal that it is not a static or discrete tissue and allows us to appreciate the human body as a whole and health, disease, and identity as a continuum. Students who have completed HSCI 372 in Spring 2013 or Fall 2013 may not take HSCI 333 for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

Examines blood via biological, laboratory/clinical, societal, and symbolic contexts and the interplay of those contexts. The dynamic interactions of blood at multiple levels in our bodies and between people reveal that it is not a static or discrete tissue and allows us to appreciate the human body as a whole and health, disease, and identity as a continuum.  

This course is about how blood works in humans. The main goal is to integrate multiple concepts in science and health and to appreciate the ‘cell to society’ theme of the Faculty of Health Sciences.   We will also explore the vivid representation of blood in culture and myth, learning why ‘Blut ist ein ganz besondrer saft’ (Blood is quite a special fluid) - Goethe.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to:
1.      Describe the basic components of blood, its origins and development, and the interactions of blood in the human body
2.      Categorize and differentiate diseases of blood and conditions producing these
3.      Explain the multiple roles of blood as an indicator of disease, health, and identity
4.      Synthesize major concepts and properties of blood in effective visual and written communication formats
5.      Evaluate and analyze laboratory studies of blood

Grading

  • First/last week answers 5%
  • eJournal 5%
  • Quizzes 10%
  • Essay 20%
  • Storyboard project 25%
  • Laboratory study 15%
  • Final Exam 20%

Materials

RECOMMENDED READING:

‘Blood: The Stuff of Life’ by Lawrence Hill
ISBN: 978-1-77089-322-1

‘Blood: An Epic History of Medicine and Commerce’ by Douglas Starr
ISBN: 978-0-688-17649-5

‘The Gift Relationship: from human blood to social policy’ by Richard Titmuss
ISBN: 978-1565844032

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS