Fall 2018 - BPK 301 D100

Biomechanics Laboratory (3)

Class Number: 6552

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    TASC2 7440, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 10, 2018
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    AQ 3003, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    PHYS 102 (or 121 or 126 or 141), BPK 201.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A laboratory course on the quantitative biomechanical evaluation of human movement. Students will learn analysis techniques for quantifying kinematics and kinetics of body segments in athletes, normal populations, and special populations during activities such as walking and jumping. Experiments will look at the nature of muscular force generation, and the mechanical impedance properties of the musculoskeletal system, as well as patterns of muscle activation, using surface EMG. Quantitative.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

(I) Introduces (E) Emphasizes (R) Reinforces (A) Applies    

(Q) Answers to questions are written in home-time on a weekly basis, and graded.
(L)  Results are compiled on a weekly basis, and feedback is provided. These are compiled into a lab notebook that is graded at the end of term
(E) A 2-hour final written exam, short-answer, analysis and interpretation questions at end of term.
(P) A group project report is prepared for the student experiment that is designed and carried out by the group. This is a written report that is graded.    

Specific Learning Outcomes  
At the end of the course students should be able to:  
  1. Experimentally measure the centre of mass and inertial properties of the human body, applying biomechanics principles to analyze data. Interpret the results with respect to physiological principles and experimental design. (R) (Q, L, E)   
  2. Experimentally measure muscle excitation using surface electromyography (EMG). Interpret the results with respect to physiological principles and experimental design. (R) (Q, L, E)   
  3. Experimentally measure wrist joint torques during contractions. Interpret the results with respect to physiological principles and experimental design. (R) (Q, L, E)   
  4. Experimentally measure the kinematics of human movement. Interpret the results with respect to biomechanical principles and experimental design. (R) (Q, L, E)   
  5. Experimentally measure ground reaction forces and shock transmission through the body. Interpret the results with respect to physiological principles and experimental design. (R) (Q, L, E)   
  6. Calculate ankle joint moments by applying biomechanics principles of inverse dynamics analysis to experimental data. Interpret the results with respect to physiological principles and the biomechanics of locomotion. (R) (Q, L, E)   
  7. Discuss and explain different sources of measurement error for biomechanical analysis. (R) (Q, L, E) 
  8. Experimentally measure long-jump performance. Analyze data using biomechanical principles and interpret findings with respect to muscle performance.  (R) (Q, L, E)   
  9. Design an experimental study, Formulate hypotheses about human movement. Experimentally collect the data and compose a written report. (A) (P)  

Grading

  • Laboratory Questions (9 labs) 30%
  • Laboratory Notebook 15%
  • Student Experimental Project 15%
  • Final Written Examination 40%

Department Undergraduate Notes:

It is the responsibility of the student to keep their BPK course outlines if they plan on furthering their education.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS