Fall 2019 - ECON 331 D100

Introduction to Mathematical Economics (5)

Class Number: 3116

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    SSCC 9000, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 7, 2019
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    SSCK 9500, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Bertille Antoine
    baa7@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-4514
  • Prerequisites:

    ECON 201 or 301; 60 units.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

The mathematical interpretation of fundamental economic concepts; demand, supply competitive equilibrium . Application of the calculus to production and distribution theory, growth models and investment theory. Differential and difference equations in dynamic economic models. Introduction to activity analysis. Students with credit for MATH 232, 240 or 251 cannot complete this course for further credit. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

The course develops the mathematical tools of matrix algebra and calculus and shows how these tools may be used in doing economic analysis. More specifically, topics that will be covered include matrices, determinants and inverse matrices; continuity, derivatives, partial derivatives, unconstrained and constrained optimization of functions of several variables.

Grading

  • Five written assignments 20%
  • Midterm exam 30%
  • Final 50%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis - Fifth Edition (2016, Prentice Hall) By Knut Sydsaeter and Peter Hammond

RECOMMENDED READING:

Mathematics for Economics – Third Edition (2012, MIT Press) By M. Hoy, J. Livernois, C. McKenna, R. Rees and A. Stengos

Department Undergraduate Notes:

***NO TUTORIALS DURING THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES***

Students requiring accommodations as a result of a disability must contact the Centre for Accessible Learning (CAL) at 778-782-3112 or caladmin@sfu.ca.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS