Fall 2019 - HIST 451 D100

Oral History: Theories and Practices (4)

Class Number: 7931

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    AQ 5027, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    45 units.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Examines ethical issues and methodological challenges that revolve around conducting oral interviews for research purposes. Students will also design and complete an oral interview project.

COURSE DETAILS:

Oral History of Lesbians and the Women's Movement

WHAT IS THIS COURSE ABOUT?
In the 1970s lesbians played a major role in the women’s movement, but not everyone welcomed them. Nevertheless, the women’s movement was essential to the formation of a strong and empowered sense of lesbian identity and facilitated the emergence of a vibrant lesbian culture. HIST 451 explores this history.

WHAT WILL WE DO?
·    Analyze primary and secondary sources in SFU’s archives and library, and at home
·    Explore the nuances of oral history methods
·    Interview someone who was active in the women’s movement in the 1970s
·    Assist a classmate in recording their interview
·    Create a short audio documentary based on your oral interview
·    Organize a community forum were we will present our work
·    Attend a public oral history event and write a review of it
·    Write two additional short papers

Grading

  • This course operates according to the principles of “ungrading.” Briefly, you will evaluate your own accomplishments and progress. See https://www.jessestommel.com/why-i-dont-grade/

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

All course readings will be available in the library. There are no books or course packs to purchase. You will need a device to record with; most laptops and many phones are suitable for this purpose, and the History Department has recording devices you may borrow. You will also need to download Audacity, which is free audio editing software. You can successfully complete this course without having to spend any money.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS