Spring 2019 - BISC 423 D100

Developmental Neurobiology (3)

Class Number: 2583

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    SWH 10061, Burnaby

    We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    SWH 10061, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 13, 2019
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    AQ 3159, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    BISC 101, BISC 102, BISC 202, MBB 222, MBB 231; all with a grade of C- or better. Recommended: BISC 333 or MBB 331.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

All aspects of neuronal development from the specification of neurons in the early embryo to the formation and maturation of neuronal circuits. Both invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms will be studied with emphasis on the molecular basis of nervous system development. Students with credit for MBB 444 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken Special Topics BISC 472 or BISC 474 Nervous System Development may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

Course description:

This is an introductory course in Developmental Neurobiology. It will cover various aspects of neuronal development beginning with the specification of neurons and regionalization of the developing nervous system in the early embryo. We will follow the birth and differentiation of neurons, their axon outgrowth and navigation as well as synaptic target selection and the formation and maturation of neuronal circuits. The various developmental processes will be presented using studies from both invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms with emphasis on the molecular basis of nervous system development. Selected topics will be explored in more detail using primary literature. Depending on enrolment, presentations of primary literature by students can be a significant part of the course.

Grading

  • Tutorials 10%
  • Midterm Exam 30%
  • Final Examination 60%

Materials

RECOMMENDED READING:

Development of the Nervous System, D.H. Sanes, T.A. Reh and W.A. HarrisThird Edition, Academic Press (2012)

Primary literature will be used in addition to the textbook

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS