Spring 2020 - HSCI 130 D100

Foundations of Health Science (4)

Class Number: 2158

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    AQ 3182, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

How health, illness and disease are defined and measured for individuals and populations. Research strategies used to identify how health, illness and disease are distributed across human populations and how environmental, socio-economic, demographic, biological, behavioural and political factors influence individual and population health. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

COURSE DETAILS:

There will be three hours of lecture time each week that will include a lecture, discussion, and sometimes an in-class exercise.  There will also be a one-hour tutorial for most weeks.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of (1) the concepts of health, illness and disease and how these constructs have varied across cultures and historical periods; (2) the terminology used to describe and measure patterns of health, illness and disease in the field of public health; (3) the social determinants of health and how we employ public policy to promote the health of the population; (4) specific health issues (e.g. sanitation, infectious diseases and rise of public health, the origin of HIV/AIDS, and climate change); and (5) health literacy.

Grading

  • Leadership, tutorial presentation and commentary 15%
  • In class exercises 5%
  • Quizzes 1 and 2 70%
  • Knowledge translation project 10%

REQUIREMENTS:

None

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Not applicable.

REQUIRED READING:

Johnson, S. The ghost map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities and the Modern World. New York: Riverhead Books, 2006.

All other articles are available online through Canvas or open access websites.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS