Fall 2022 - MBB 423 D100

Protein Structure and Function (3)

Class Number: 2284

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    AQ 3159, Burnaby

    Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    AQ 3159, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    MBB 323 or MBB 324, with a minimum grade of C.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Mechanistic principles for how protein molecules achieve diverse functions such as chemical catalysis and conformational switching. Students will learn to critique hypotheses about structural mechanisms, and to interpret the primary literature reporting on structural evidence from X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy.

COURSE DETAILS:

Course Description:

This course will begin with a review of basic protein structure principles and move into advanced mechanistic principles for how protein molecules achieve diverse functions such as chemical catalysis and conformational switching.  The course will discuss topics that are at the frontier of the protein structure-function field, with a focus on how protein structure underlies biological function, especially in the context of health and disease.  The course has an equal emphasis on principles of protein structure-function as well as the diverse methodologies used to examine protein structure-function. Students will learn to critique hypotheses about structural mechanisms, and to interpret the primary literature reporting on structural evidence from a variety of classical and emerging methodologies.

Course Details:

MBB 423 is an advanced undergraduate and graduate (MBB 723) course on protein structure function.  This course will be divided into 3 modules in chronological order:

  1. Module 1: Principles of protein structure and structure:function relationships. (Lectures 1-6)
  2. Module 2: Detailed overview of various biophysical, biochemical, analytical, and computational methods for studying protein and protein-ligand structure and dynamics. (Lectures 6-14)
  3. Module 3: Literature-based assignments and presentations by enrolled students focusing on protein structure:function in human health and disease (Students will select their protein of interest and date of presentation in consultation with the instructor).
Topics:
  • Importance of protein structure:function in health and disease
  • Protein stability and flexibility      
  • Enzyme structure:function
  • Chemical, physical and computational methods of obtaining, analyzing or predicting protein structures 
  • Protein evolution and 5-dimensional structure analyses

Grading

  • Two timed exams (worth 20% and 30% respectively) 50%
  • Class presentations and participation 20%
  • Final written assignment 30%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

This course is not textbook-based. Course readings and research journal articles will be available in electronic Library Reserves or Canvas.

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Department Undergraduate Notes:


  • For help with writing, learning and study strategies please contact the Student Learning Commons at
    http://learningcommons.sfu.ca/
  • Students requiring accommodations as a result of a disability, must contact the Centre for Accessible Learning (778-782-3112 or e-mail:  caladmin@sfu.ca)

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html