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Student Enrolment

Enrolment is the process of formally assigning and recording a student’s enrolment in a course(s). Enrolment is open only to those who have been admitted or readmitted to Simon Fraser University, or who are eligible for reactivation. An exception is that special audit students need not be formally admitted before enrolment (see Continuing Studies).

In the trimester system, a student must enrol for any combination of terms or sessions during an academic year. Students have access to the enrolment system based on the number of units completed and in progress, and on the student’s cumulative grade point average. Students are assigned an appointment date and time when access is activated.

Note: The enrolment procedure for designated off-campus programs and distance education courses is the same as for on-campus courses. Specific program details are available in brochures published each term. See “Continuing Studies”.

Information about how to enrol and details about the course’s day, time, place and instructor is provided in the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations and on the web at http://sis.sfu.ca. The University reserves the right to change arrangements without notice although it will endeavor to inform students who are affected by such changes.

Library/Identification Card

A student library/identity card is provided to enrolled or enrolled students. This card is required when borrowing books from the Library and for other on-campus identification purposes. In the event that this card is lost, destroyed or damaged, a replacement card may be obtained from Student Services upon payment of a fee.

Academic Advising and Student Success

3200 Maggie Benston Student Services Centre, 778.782.4356 Tel, 778.782.4969 Fax, http://students.sfu.ca/advising, Monday to Thursday 9 am – 6 pm, Friday 10 am – 4:30 pm

This office provides advice for newly admitted and continuing first and second year students who have not declared a specialization (for a major, minor, double major, joint major or an honors program see Undergraduate Programs). Academic advisors assist with course selection and program planning in any faculty. Advisors also assist students in academic difficulty to provide assistance about policies related to academic standing and continuance, course withdrawals, readmission after being required to withdraw due to poor academic performance, and retroactive withdrawals applications.

Definitions

The following are the most commonly used terms that new students may find confusing.

Students
Simon Fraser University does not classify students as either full time or part time although there are varying course load requirements for many types of financial aid (see “Financial Aid and Awards”).
Continuing Students
Students who enrolled for one or more of the last three terms and who are eligible to continue will be advised of enrolment procedures and deadlines well in advance of each term.
Former Students
Under certain conditions, former students submit formal application for readmission in order to continue academic studies at the University (see “Admission and Readmission”).
New Students
After the application for admission has been assessed, the applicant will be advised of admission. If admitted, the student receives instruction on the procedure to enrol in courses.
Qualifying Student
See “1.3.6 Admission as a Qualifying Student”.
Regular Student
A regular student is one proceeding to a degree, diploma or certificate in any faculty. A regular student may already hold one or more bachelor’s degrees.
Special Audit Student
Students who do not apply for University admission under the general admission regulations but who wish to audit credit courses may be given entry as special audit students. Special application procedures apply; see “Special Audit Student”.
Special Student
A student already holding a first degree may, as a special student, enrol in undergraduate courses only. Credit for these courses may not be applied toward completion of any certificate, diploma, undergraduate or graduate credential at Simon Fraser University. First time applicants wishing to enrol as special students and students holding a first degree who have previously attended Simon Fraser University should see “Admission and Readmission”.
Visiting and Exchange Students
A visiting student is a bona fide student of another accredited institution who is permitted to complete credit courses only toward a degree, certificate or diploma at the home institution. Applicants who wish to become visiting students must meet all admission requirements and must submit a letter of permission from the home institution’s registrar. A visiting student wishing to become a regular Simon Fraser University student must reapply and meet admission requirements in effect at that time.

Academic Year

Trimester

Simon Fraser University offers three full terms or semesters within the twelve month calendar year.

Term

The calendar year is divided into three academic terms of 16 weeks each. Each term has its own enrolment and final examinations. All academic courses are one term long, or a shorter session such as intersession or summer session. Students may enter at the beginning of any term and attend one, two or three terms in a year. By attending continuously, a student who entered from BC high school grade 12 (or equivalent) in the fall 2009 term could graduate with a bachelor’s degree at the end of the spring 2012 term. The following illustrates an academic year.

  • fall term: September – December
  • spring term: January – April
  • summer term: May – August
  • intersession: May – June
  • summer session: July – August

To increase the accessibility of the summer program (May-August) to teachers and others, the summer term is enriched by two, two-month sessions called intersession (May-June) and summer session (July-August). These programs are offered in addition to the regular four month summer term.

Term Codes

The University’s student information system uses numeric codes for terms. Students will often encounter these codes when using https://sis.sfu.ca, the on-line student services portal. Here are the term codes for the upcoming year:

  • 1097 = fall 2009
  • 1101 = spring 2010
  • 1104 = summer 2010

The codes can be interpreted as follows:

  • 1 represents the 21st century
  • 09 = year
  • the final digit is the term: 1 for spring, 4 for summer and 7 for fall.

Levels

Undergraduates in Canada are traditionally classified as first year (freshman), second year (sophomore), third year (junior), or fourth year (senior) students. Since ‘year’ does not apply to the trimester system, the student’s progression is expressed in levels. ‘Level’ refers to the status of a student’s program. Each level normally equals one term’s work with a full course load; a typical four year bachelor’s degree program consists of eight levels. The first four (i.e., the first 60 units) are lower divisions. Levels 5 and above are upper divisions. The term ‘level’ is not used for graduate programs. Usually students in levels 1 and 2 complete 100 series courses; those in levels 3 and 4 complete 200 series courses; those beyond level 4 complete 300 and 400 series courses.

Four Year General Degree Program

 

Level

Units

Traditional Terms

Lower Levels

1

15

first year or freshman

2

15

3

15

second year or sophomore

4

15

Upper Levels

5

15

third year or junior

6

15

7

15

fourth year or senior

8

15

Total 120 units

Four Year Honors Degree Program

 

Level

Units

Traditional Terms

Lower Levels

1

15

first year or freshman

2

15

3

15

second year or sophomore

4

15

Upper Levels

5

18

third year or junior

6

18

7

18

fourth year or senior

8

18

Total 132 units

Courses

Subject
A subject (or ‘discipline’) is a body of knowledge with arbitrary boundary lines, e.g. philosophy, chemistry or psychology. For convenience, professors of a subject are usually grouped together in a department.
Prerequisite
A prerequisite, also called a requisite, is a requirement needed to enrol in a course.
Corequisite
A corequisite is a course to be completed at the same time as another course.
Division
Division relates to undergraduate courses: those numbered 001 to 299 inclusive are lower division courses; those numbered 300 to 499 are upper division courses. Graduate courses are numbered in the 500 to 999 series. In certain instances, upper division courses may be completed in the lower levels and lower division courses in the upper levels. Refer to specific regulations pertaining to requirements for degrees, certificates or diplomas.
Course Numbering
Each subject is divided into courses usually offered in term length units. Each course is identified by a subject name followed by a course number, the number of units, and course title, e.g. ENGL 103-3 Introduction to Drama. The first course number digit represents the division of the course; the fourth digit indicates the units. For example, ENGL 103-3 is a first division course offering three units.
Lectures, Tutorials and Laboratories
Although there are variations among departments, instruction in lower division courses combines a large lecture section with small tutorial groups. The large lecture enables as many students as possible to hear the very best teachers. The small tutorial groups provide more personal instruction and an opportunity for discussion of readings and lecture material. A typical course consists of two lectures and one tutorial a week. Notable exceptions are the sciences and languages, where a laboratory may be involved.
Credit Courses
These courses carry units and count toward the total required for a degree, certificate or diploma, subject to the regulations governing the credential.
Credit Hours
See “Units” below.
Units
Units, formerly known as credits, are assigned to each course; most have three units. A normal course load for full attendance in a term is 15 units. Requirements for credentials (e.g., degrees, diplomas and certificates) are partially expressed as units.
The unit weight is shown for each course as follows.
subject: Mathematics (MATH)
course number: 232
units: 3
Credit-Free Courses
These courses carry no credit and do not count toward a degree, certificate or diploma. At times, they are termed ‘non-credit courses.’
Additive Credit
In courses deemed to have additive credit, the units do not count towards the total units required for a degree. Co-operative Education practicum courses typically have additive credit.
Distance Education Courses
Many courses are available as distance education courses. The majority of these are print-based. Some may also have audio and/or video support. Increasingly, educational technologies (e.g. computer conferencing) are being incorporated as courses are developed and revised. The program parallels the campus term system of the University, with the same 16 week period for course completion. For more information, see “Centre for Online and Distance Education”.
Obligation to Declare Majors, Minors or Other Areas of Specialization
Students are expected to obtain formal approval to enter an area of specialization by the time they have earned 60 units. ‘Specialization’ is a term used to cover programs such as majors, minors, double majors, honors, extended minors, etc. ‘Department’ refers to the faculty, department, school or unit responsible for a program. There are some other programs (e.g., post baccalaureate diplomas, certificates) which may have additional instruction regarding procedure since the students in these programs fall outside the usual flow of units.
Undeclared
This category will be used for any student who, prior to the successful completion of the 61st unit, has not recorded an intended specialization. Academic advising for undeclared students is available from Academic Advising and Student Success.
Approved
This category identifies the specialization of a student who is formally approved by the department or signing authority for that specialization and may be granted at the department’s discretion or signing authority. This must be done by the 61st unit. Advising for approved students is the responsibility of the department offering the approved specialization(s).

Course Loads

The following maximum course loads apply to all students, but certain students may be granted permission by their respective faculties to enrol in course overloads (see below).

Regular Session

The maximum course load for all students who are not enrolled for summer session courses only, or intersession courses only and who are not entering their graduating term is as follows:

  • Applied Sciences, Arts and Social Sciences, Business Administration or Science – 18 units
  • Communication, Art and Technology – 18 units
  • Education – 20 units
  • Engineering Science – 22 units (permission of the director is required for course loads below 15 units).
  • Environment – 18 units
  • Health Science – 18 units

Intersession or Summer Session Only

Students enrolling for the intersession or summer session only may not enrol in programs having a total value in excess of nine units, except where course combinations may require enrolment in a program of 10 units; however, no student will be permitted to undertake a program of more than 10 units of work.

Summer Term, Intersession, Summer Session Combinations

Normal course load limits apply to students who enrol in combinations of the above. For course load values only, in the regular summer term the course load value corresponds to the course’s units. In the intersession or summer session, the course load value is twice the units because, in the shorter session, classes must meet twice as often or for longer periods to equal the regular term. Therefore, when calculating course load value, note the following example. This does not apply to the regulations for assessment of financial aid and awards.

Course

Units

 

Course Load Credit

ARCH 371-5
(if completed in summer term)

5

equals

5

ARCH 372-5
(if completed in eight week intersession or summer session)

5

equals

10

Total Course Load

10

equals

15

Course Overloads

No student who is on academic probation may enrol in a course overload.

In the Faculty of Applied Sciences, approved majors who wish to enrol in an overload require permission of the director of their school. Other Faculty of Applied Sciences students require permission of the dean of the faculty. In the School of Engineering Science, permission of the director is required for course overloads exceeding 22 units.

In the Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences; Business Administration; Communication, Art and Technology; Education; Environment; and Health Sciences only, a student who requires an overload to fulfil graduation requirements in the term for which he/she is enrolling may be allowed, with the dean’s permission, to enrol in an overload.

In the Faculty of Science, a student entering the graduating term who requires specific courses to fulfil graduation requirements in the term for which the student is enrolling, may be permitted to enrol in courses totalling up to 21 units, provided either the cumulative grade point average or the most recent term grade point average is 3.0 or higher.

A limited number of overloads may be approved, by the dean of the faculty in which the student is enrolled, on an individual basis during the course change period.

Repeated Simon Fraser University Courses

Where a student repeats a course, the course(s) with the lower grade will be recorded on official records as an excluded course. If the same grade or grade equivalent value is earned for a repeated course, the course that was completed most recently is included in the term grade point average (GPA) and cumulative GOPA, and the former course is excluded in the term GPA and cumulative GPA. A student’s academic standing for previous terms does not change even though the GPA changes.

When a course is repeated and the unit value has decreased, the student must, in consultation with the department, make up the missing unit component before being credited with the full original units.

Limits on Repeated Courses

The number of courses which a student may repeat in a degree program is limited to five. The number of times a student may repeat a course is once. Courses completed at Simon Fraser University for which a student has already received transfer credit from another institution will count within five repeats limit.

Students can only repeat special topics courses, which they have failed, when the topic is deemed to be the same as the one for which the student has already received credit. Normally special topics courses can be repeated because the course content changes with each offering.

Repeated Transfer Credit

Students may not receive transfer credit for a course which is a repeat of a course passed at Simon Fraser University. At Simon Fraser University, a grade of D and those above it are passing grades.

If a student enrolls for a repeat course, and completes the course with a passing grade, the transfer units will remain on the academic record as a repeat, with a zero credit or unit value. If the course is completed with a failing grade, the transfer units will remain on the academic record. A department may permit units to count for both a transfer course and a Simon Fraser University course, if the course content is judged to be sufficiently different.

Current limits on course repeats, where one course is a Simon Fraser University course, will apply to repeated transfer courses. The implementation of this policy will not affect the method of calculating grade point averages. Current limits on course repeats, where both courses are transfer credit will not apply.

Courses at Other Institutions/Letters of Permission

Simon Fraser University students who wish to complete academic work at other institutions for undergraduate degree, diploma or certificate credit at this University must obtain permission in advance by applying for a Letter of Permission through Student Services. All students considering requesting a Letter of Permission should consult an academic advisor. The faculty advisor (and the department advisor if a program has been declared) will be contracted by Student Services for approval. Students should allow six to eight weeks for processing of their request. Normally, a Letter of Permission will not be approved retroactively.

Students must have completed a minimum of nine units at Simon Fraser University and must be in good academic standing at the time they submit their request for a Letter of Permission to Student Services. Since standing is achieved once all grades for the term have been received, students may have to wait until their third term at Simon Fraser University to be eligible to complete a course elsewhere.

Permission to complete a course at another institution will not be granted unless a valid academic reason is provided. For example, complete a course in a discipline not offered at Simon Fraser University, such as Czech language. While an approved Letter of Permission guarantees that the credit will count toward the overall credit requirement, it does not guarantee that the credit will meet a specific program requirement.

A Letter of Permission is automatically denied if a student's standing is 'on academic probation' (OAP), 'continued academic probation' (CAP), or 'required to withdraw' (RTW). Courses completed at another institution cannot be used to satisfy Simon Fraser University's minimum residency requirement and will not be included in the CGPA calculation. Therefore, such courses cannot be used to raise standing.

Students must achieve a grade of at least C (2.0 numeric equivalent) or 60% in order to receive transfer credit for courses completed at other institutions. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that an official transcript from the host institution is forwarded to Student Services at Simon Fraser University in order for transfer credit to be granted.

Students participating in formal exchange programs should see “International Exchange Programs” for more information.

Course Challenge

Course challenge is a method by which a student may obtain credit for course material learned elsewhere (i.e. outside Simon Fraser University). A maximum of 60 units may be obtained by the combined mechanism of course challenge and transfer credit.

A student must be eligible to enrol in order to enrol for course challenge.

  • course challenge is not permitted for a course for which credit has already been obtained at Simon Fraser University or through transfer credit. A student may not enrol in one term for both regular enrolment and course challenge in the same course at the same time, but must select one or the other, and may not change that decision in that term later than ten days following the commencement of University classes
  • a student is not entitled to enrol for course challenge if he/she has recorded two challenges as either unsuccessful or unattempted
  • a student is not permitted to challenge a course(s) he/she has previously failed at Simon Fraser University
  • course challenge is not included in the grade point average
  • units through course challenge do not count towards term units or units for government student assistance programs (e.g., Canada Student Loan, BC Student Loan, etc.) or Simon Fraser University administered financial assistance programs including scholarships, bursaries, awards and loans
  • a department may elect to offer or not to offer the opportunity for course challenge

Please note the following with regard to course challenges in the Department of French and in the Latin American Studies Program.

With approval, a student may enrol and pay fees for challenge in a specified course sequence in a given language. If the student satisfactorily completes a course in the given language at an advanced sequence level, the department may indicate ‘successful’ in the preceding course(s) of the sequence in which the student is enrolled for challenge. If the student does not satisfactorily complete the advanced level course, then formal challenge assessment of the preceding level(s) should be undertaken to avoid two challenges without success based solely on the advanced assessment.

Enrolment for Course Challenge

Any eligible student who wishes to enrol for course challenge must obtain an official course challenge enrolment form from Student Services or the academic department, seek approval of the appropriate department chair to enrol for course challenge in that department, and return the completed form to Student Services or the academic department by the tenth day following commencement of classes. Normally, a student may not complete enrolment for course challenge after the end of the tenth day of classes. During the first ten days of classes, a student may change enrolment in course challenge from one course to another or to regular enrolment in courses, but may not withdraw from course challenge without substitution of regular course enrolment. After the tenth day of classes, no further course challenge changes will be permitted.

Course Audit

A student who has satisfied the admission requirements of the University may attend a specific course(s) as an auditor upon completion of the necessary enrolment procedures, which include written approval of the department concerned.

Note: Course audit and special audit are for different categories of students. Those interested in gaining entry as special audit students should see “Special Audit Student”.

Program/Course Changes and Withdrawal

Program Changes

Any program changes require departmental approval on the program approval form which is available from the major department or on the Student Services website at http://students.sfu.ca/forms, and are processed by the department.

Course Changes

You are urged to read the tuition refund policy and penalties for dropping courses very carefully to avoid, or minimize, financial penalty for dropping courses in which you enrol. Details of the policy, and deadlines, appear in the Undergraduate Fees section of the Calendar and, also in the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations (http://sis.sfu.ca). Failure to attend classes does not constitute withdrawal from a course. Courses that are not formally dropped will be given a failing grade; payment for the course’s tuition fee is required.

Term Course Changes

The Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations (http://sis.sfu.ca), published in pdf format each term, contains detailed instruction procedures, and term specific deadline dates to be followed to change courses during the enrolment process and after the start of classes. Deadline dates may vary for the intersession and summer session.

Summer Session and Intersession Course Changes

For course change information in the intersession and summer session, refer to the summer term Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations (http://sis.sfu.ca). Financial penalties apply to courses dropped during class days 6 to 10. There is no refund for courses dropped after day 10 of classes.

Normal Course Change Period

Regular Term – Class Days 1-5

Courses may be added or dropped or tutorial times changed using the enrolment system without prior approval of the department offering the course. Courses that are dropped will not receive a notation on the student’s academic record.

Changes to courses registered for course challenge or for course audit must be approved by the department offering the course. During this time period a student may change enrolment in course challenge from one course to another, or to regular enrolment in the course.

Enrolment for course audit, course challenge and course changes must be done in person at the department offering the course.

Extended Course Change Period

Regular Term – Class Days 6-15

After the fifth day of classes to the 15th day, courses may be added only with special permission of the chair and instructor concerned. No courses can be added or changed to audit status after this time. Courses may be dropped without academic record notation. However, if a student drops all term courses, the withdrawal will be noted on the academic record. A student may not withdraw from course challenge without substitution of a regular course enrolment. During the first ten days of classes, he/she may change enrolment in course challenge from one course to another, or to regular enrolment in the course. Permission of the department is required.

Financial penalties apply to courses dropped during class days 6 to 10. There is no refund for courses dropped after day 10 of classes.

Course Drop Period

Regular Term – Class Days 16-25

No courses can be added or changed to audit status after the fifteenth day of classes.

After the 15th to the 25th day of classes, courses may be dropped by the student via the web at http://sis.sfu.ca. Courses dropped within this period will be automatically recorded with a WD notation on the student’s academic record. There is no refund for courses dropped during this period. Students can apply to drop courses for extenuating circumstances at this time and if approved, the notation will be WE rather than WD.

During the sixth to twelfth class week a course(s) may be dropped only in extenuating circumstances. If approved, there will be a WE notation on the student’s academic record for specific courses dropped. Apply to Student Services. Requests arising after the twelfth week, or requests relating to courses completed in a previous term, are referred to as ‘retroactive’ and follow the same procedures as above but may take longer to adjudicate.

Note: Extenuating circumstances are defined as unusual circumstances beyond the student’s control which make it impossible for the student to complete the course. If a course drop is being considered after the 12th week of classes, it is recommended that students seek advice from Academic Advising and Student Success or their department advisor.

Withdrawal from the University

Students wishing to withdraw from all courses in a term must follow the same schedule as outlined above in Term Course Changes. Specific term dates can be found in http://sis.sfu.ca.

For regular intersession and summer session terms, there is no refund for withdrawal from all courses in a term after day 10 of classes.

Official records will be updated to record the date on which term withdrawal was effected. The withdrawal date for students who withdraw after the fifth day of classes will be recorded on the academic record.

Examinations

Final examinations will normally be held during the last two weeks of each term (Intersession and Summer Session exams are held in the last week of the session). Examination period dates are outlined in the Academic Calendar of Events, and in the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations (http://students.sfu.ca/enrollment/schedule.html). Students must check the exam schedule when planning course selections. Students are reminded that final examinations may be scheduled at any time during the examination period and that students should avoid making travel or employment arrangements for this period. Students are not normally allowed to enrol in courses with conflicting examination times. Students who have a good reason to enrol in classes with conflicting exam times must seek permission from the departments who are offering those classes.

There are instances where students are faced with examination hardship, which is defined as

  • three or more end-of-term examinations scheduled within a 24 hour period
  • an examination at one location (e.g. the main Burnaby campus) followed immediately by an exam at another location (e.g., the Surrey campus).

For three or more exams, a student shall be given a new exam date (within the established exam period) for the second exam causing hardship by the respective instructor or department/faculty. For students with exams at more than one location, advance arrangements will be made by the instructor or department/faculty to write both exams at a single location. Students must notify the instructor(s) and department one month prior to the exam date.

Each student is required to participate in assigned work during the term. The grades obtained for that work may be used to determine the final course standing. A passing grade in any exam does not ensure a passing grade for the course.

Students who miss exams because of illness or for compassionate reasons must communicate with their instructor (see DE grade).

A student may not rewrite a final paper or examination unless he/she re-enrols for the course and fulfils course requirements as outlined by the instructor.

In-class final examinations are not to be held before the beginning of the official examination period. Take-home examinations cannot be due until the commencement of the official examination period.

Instructors are required to submit grades within 96 hours after the exam via the on-line grade roster, to Records and Registration. (Please refer to exam procedures at http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity/resources/examprocedures.html.)

Grades

The following three grading systems are used at Simon Fraser University.

Standard Grade System

Letter grade

Definition

Numerical equivalent

A+

A

A-

excellent performance

4.33

4.00

3.67

B+

B

B-

good performance

3.33

3.00

2.67

C+

C

satisfactory performance

2.33

2.00

C-

D

marginal performance

1.67

1.00

F

fail (unsatisfactory performance)

0.00

FD

fail (academic discipline)

0.00

N

did not write final exam or otherwise complete course

0.00

Competency Based Grades

This grading system is based on satisfactory acquisition of defined skills or successful completion of the course learning outcomes.

Letter grade

Definition

Numerical equivalent

P

satisfactory performance or better (pass, ungraded)

no equivalent

F

fail (unsatisfactory performance)

0.00

FD

fail (academic discipline)

0.00

Practicum Grades

This grading system is based on satisfactory acquisition of the practicum.

Letter grade

Definition

Numerical equivalent

P

satisfactory performance or better (pass, ungraded)

no equivalent

W

withdrawn

no equivalent

Student Record and Transcript Notations

Notations are placed on a student’s record to indicate a status or standing and provide additional information to the student and the University. Notations do not impact a student’s grade point average.

Letter grade

Definition

Numerical equivalent

AE

aegrotat standing, compassionate pass

no equivalent

AU

audit

no equivalent

CC

course challenge

no equivalent

CF

course challenge fail

no equivalent

CN

did not complete challenge

no equivalent

CR

credit without grade

no equivalent

FX

formal exchange

no equivalent

WD

withdrawal

no equivalent

WE

withdrawal under extenuating circumstances

no equivalent

Temporary Grades

Temporary grades are assigned for specific circumstances and will convert to a final grade according to the grading system used in the course. Note that temporary grades revert to one of the standard, competency or notations as shown above.

Letter grade

Definition

Numerical equivalent

DE

deferred grade

no equivalent

GN

grade not reported

no equivalent

IP

in progress

no equivalent

Explanation of Standard Grades

FD Grades

The letter grade FD (fail, academic discipline) is given by the chair of the department when a student has committed academic dishonesty (see Policy S10.01 Appendix 3). The grade will remain on a student’s transcript until two years following graduation at which time it will convert to F.

N Grades

The letter grade N (incomplete) is given when a student has enrolled for a course, but did not write the final examination or otherwise failed to complete the course work, and did not withdraw before the deadline date. An N is considered an F for purposes of scholastic standing.

A student receiving a grade of N must re-enrol for the course and participate in the course again, completing course requirements approved by the instructor, to achieve a different evaluation.

Explanation of Competency Based Grades

P Grades

The designation P (pass) will be given when a student successfully completes a course graded on a pass (P) or withdrawn (W) basis. This grade has no numerical equivalent and does not affect the term grade point average or the cumulative GPA.

W Grades

The designation W (withdrawn) will be given when a student is withdrawn after the course drop period for a course graded on a pass (P) or withdrawn (W) basis. The grade of W has no numerical equivalent and does not affect either the term grade point average or the cumulative grade point average.

Explanation of Student Record and Transcript Notations

AE Grades
Aegrotat standing (AE) may be awarded in an incomplete course on medical or compassionate grounds by the registrar acting on the recommendation of the instructor or department chair. Written evidence must substantiate such a request, given that the course requirements have been substantially fulfilled. This evidence normally must be received by the registrar or department within 96 hours of a scheduled final exam or within 96 hours of the last day of term lectures for which such standing is requested. Courses for which aegrotat standing is awarded are not included in the GPA calculation.
AU Notation
Audit is an AU notation that is recorded when a student has approval from the department not to complete the course for credit. The last day to audit a course is the end of week one of the term. Audited courses will not count toward degree requirements.
CC Grades
Course Challenge Completed is a grade for a student who has been enrolled for a course challenge, subject to an assessment equivalent to the course’s final exam plus an interview which may include an oral and/or practical exam, all to be arranged and approved by the department chair. Departments may hold course challenge exams at any time after the term’s start. A performance equivalent to a C grade or higher is required for a successful course challenge.

The department concerned must submit a report to the registrar on or before the last day for regular grades submission for that term indicating the final disposition for the course challenge in the term. There is no provision for extension or deferral. Results will be recorded by departments as successful, unsuccessful or unattempted. Successful results will appear on transcripts and statements of standing with the entry CC in the grade column and with units shown. The CC grade has no numerical equivalent and is not included in the grade point average. The grade of CC may not be applied in any way toward application for scholarships, bursaries or loans.
CF Grades
The Challenge Failed grade of CF is given for unsuccessful course challenge when a student performs unsatisfactorily and fails a course challenge. The grade has no numerical equivalent and is not included in the calculation of the grade point average.
CN Grades
The Challenge Not Completed grade of CN is given for unattempted course challenge when a student is enrolled for a course challenge but never attended the course and did not withdraw before the deadline date. The grade has no numerical equivalent and is not included in the calculation of grade point average.
CR Grades
The Credit Granted notation is to recognize course work completed at another institution that is also being granted credit towards a Simon Fraser University degree program. The CR grade, which has no numerical equivalent and is not included in the grade point average calculation, may only be assigned by the Office of the Registrar and is typically used for double degree programs.
FX Grades
The Formal Exchange/Double Degree grade of FX is assigned for formal exchange and double degree courses only. The grade has no numerical equivalent and is not included in the GPA calculation.
WD Notation
The Withdrawal notation of WD identifies a course freely dropped by the student. The notation WD is not a grade and does not affect the grade point average. Different time periods are in effect for intersession and summer session. For term specific dates, refer to the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations located at http://students.sfu.ca.
WE Notations
The Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances notations of WE identifies a course drop approved for extenuating circumstances normally during week six through to the end of week 12 of a term. The notation WE is not a grade and does not affect the grade point average. Extenuating circumstances are defined as unusual circumstances beyond the student’s control which make it impossible for the student to complete the course. Different time periods are in effect for intersession and summer session. For term specific dates, refer to the Undergraduate Schedule of Classes and Examinations (http://students.sfu.ca).

Explanation of Temporary Grades

DE Grades

A deferred grade is a temporary grade assigned at the end of the term for incomplete course work. A deferred grade will revert to a letter grade or notation. The DE notation can be issued in two circumstances.

  • A student must request a DE within 24 hours after the final examination date or final course work is submitted on the basis of documented medical or compassionate grounds. Within four days the student must also submit a physician’s certificate or other document substantiating the request for deferral. Failure to submit supporting documents may result in an F grade.
  • The course instructor decides to defer submitting a final grade pending completion of further work by a student or students.

All unchanged DE notations will be converted automatically to F after the end of the first week in the following term. In exceptional cases, an extension may be granted by the instructor and must be approved by the department chair and submitted in writing to the Office of the Registrar with a final deferral date. Normally, the maximum extension allowed is the end of the term following the original deferral. DE is a temporary grade that will revert to a letter grade or notation.

GN Notation

The Grade Not Reported notation may be used if circumstances beyond the instructor’s or University’s control make it impossible for grades to be assigned for the entire class. The notation has no numerical equivalent and does not affect either the term grade point average or cumulative grade point average. The dean of the faculty responsible advises the registrar, in writing, that the notation GN is required for a course until grades can be submitted. GN is a temporary grade that will revert to a letter grade or notation.

IP Grades

An In Progress grade of IP is a temporary grade assigned for incomplete practicum courses in the Faculty of Education. The grade has no numerical equivalent and is not included in the grade point average. IP grades will convert to P or W.

Credit for the Term

All credit earned for the term will be granted regardless of the term’s grade point average (GPA). Credit may be granted for a specific course/topic once only. See “Repeated Simon Fraser University Courses” on page 27.

Statement of Grades

At the end of each term, grades for that term are made available to students on the student information system. Students who are not in good academic standing will be notified. Grade changes will be processed as soon as possible. Information concerning grades is not released to unauthorized persons without written consent of the student.

Grade Point Averages

The grade point average (GPA) is a method of expressing the student’s performance as a numerical average. Each letter grade is assigned a numerical equivalent, which is then multiplied by the unit value assigned to the course to produce the grade point. Grades without a numerical equivalent are not included in the calculation of the grade point average.

Term grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total grade points earned by the total units completed in the term to the second decimal place.

 

Letter Grade

Numeric Value

Units

Grade Point

course 1

A

4.00

3

12.00

course 2

A+

4.33

3

12.99

course 3

B-

2.67

3

8.01

course 4

C

2.00

3

6.00

course 5

F

0.00

4

0.00

Total

16

39.00

term grade point average: 39/16 = 2.44

The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) expresses performance as a numerical average for all terms completed and is closed in the term in which a degree or diploma is awarded by senate. A new CGPA begins when a student returns for further studies following the awarding of a degree or diploma.

The CGPA is calculated by dividing the total grade points earned to date by the total units undertaken to date to the second decimal place. The CGPA calculated for terms completed prior to the fall term 1979 includes repeated courses.

The upper division grade point average (UDGPA) is calculated by dividing the total grade points earned in upper division courses by the total units assigned for those courses, counting only the higher grade in courses that have been repeated.

Standing Required for Continuance

Every student is expected to maintain an acceptable scholarship standard — specifically, a minimum 2.00 CGPA. A student who does not do so is considered to be performing unsatisfactorily. The required standing for continuation will be calculated after an attempt of nine units at Simon Fraser University.

Academic Alert

A student whose term grade point average (GPA) falls below 2.00, but who is not placed on any of the academic standings given below, should seek guidance at Academic Advising and Student Success.

Academic Probation

A student who has attempted at least nine units and has a CGPA of less than 2.00 shall be placed on academic probation (OAP) and may not enrol in a course overload. A student on OAP may not receive a ‘letter of permission’ to attend another university or college. See “Reactivation and Readmission” on page 25. A student on academic probation shall be evaluated at the end of each term, and if

• the term GPA and the CGPA are each 2.00 or higher, the student shall be in good academic standing

  • the term GPA is 2.00 or higher, but the CGPA is less than 2.00, the student shall continue on academic probation (CAP)
  • the term GPA is less than 2.00, but the CGPA is 2.00 or higher, the student shall continue on academic probation (CAP). (This could occur if a student repeats a course.)
  • both the term GPA and the CGPA are less than 2.00, the student shall be required to withdraw (RTW) from the University or, if previously required to withdraw (RTW), shall be placed on extended withdrawal (PW)

Required to Withdraw

A student may be required to withdraw (RTW) after one or more terms on academic probation (see ‘outcomes for a student on academic probation’ below). A student on RTW may not receive a letter of permission to attend another university oR college.

Extended Withdrawal

A student may be placed on extended withdrawal (PW) after she/he is required to withdraw (RTW), is readmitted and subsequently is on academic probation for one or more terms (see Outcomes for a Student on Academic Probation below). A student on extended withdrawal (PW) may not receive a letter of permission to attend another university or college.

Outcomes for a Student on Academic Probation

A student on academic probation shall be evaluated at the end of each term. If, at the end of the term,

  • the SGPA and the CGPA are each 2.00 or higher, the student shall be in good academic standing
  • the SGPA is 2.00 or higher, but the CGPA is less than 2.00, the student shall continue on academic probation
  • the SGPA is less than 2.00, but the CGPA is 2.00 or higher, the student continues on academic probation (this could occur if a student repeats a course).
  • both the SGPA and the CGPA are less than 2.00, the student shall be required to withdraw (RTW) from the University or, if previously required to withdraw (RTW), shall be placed on extended withdrawal (PW)

Options for Required to Withdraw Students

Students whose status is Required to Withdraw (RTW) may choose one of the following options.

  • apply for entry to the Student Success Program and an extension to the academic probation period (refer to 'Extended Academic Probation for First Time RTW Students' section below)
  • apply for readmission based on subsequent completion of transferable courses from another institution (refer to 'Readmission after Required to Withdraw' section below)

Note: students who choose to attend another institution subsequent to being Required to Withdraw for purposes of applying for readmission are not eligible for entry to the Student Success Program.

Extended Academic Probation for First Time RTW Students

A student who is required to withdraw for the first time may be eligible to enter the Student Success Program, a two term program focusing on academic and learning skill development with concurrent credit course enrolment. Students cannot exceed nine units (unless advance special permission is received), and may not receive a letter of permission to attend another post-secondary institution while in the program. Entry requirements, set out by the program, are available through the Student Success Program office. Acceptance and participation provides an extended academic probation period. A student can only attend the program once in their academic career; normally withdrawal and/or unsuccessful program completion constitutes one attempt.

Evaluation and Continuance Requirements during Extended Academic Probation

To participate and continue, students must fulfil all required components in each of the two terms. Progress evaluation occurs throughout the program and at the end of each term. Students deemed not to be meeting the requirements at any time (academic and/or non-academic) will be withdrawn from the program, dropped from enrolled courses, and will be 'Required to Withdraw' from the University.

Outcomes for a Student on Extended Academic Probation

End of Term One

  • the semester grade point average (SGPA) and the cumulative grade point average (CGPA) are each 2.00 or higher, the student shall be in good academic standing
  • the SGPA is 2.00 or higher, but the CGPA is less than 2.00, the student shall continue on academic probation
  • the SGPA is less than 2.00, but the CGPA is 2.00 or higher, the student continues on academic probation (this could occur if a student repeats a course).
  • both the SGPA and the CGPA are less than 2.00, the student shall be required to withdraw (RTW) from the university unless the student has satisfactory participation in the program

End of Term Two

Evaluation of academic standing reverts to the academic standing and continuance policy that applies to students who are not on extended academic probation.

Grade Point Averages Needed for Graduation

Grade point averages (GPAs) used for graduation are the minimum GPAs that must be achieved to satisfy the requirements for a degree or other credential. The graduation GPA must be obtained both on the overall course work (CGPA) as well as on the upper division subset of that work (UDGPA).

In addition, program GPAs are the required minimum to satisfy the requirements of an honors, major, extended minor or minor program. In each case, the program GPA must be obtained both on the overall course work (CGPA) as well as on the upper division subset of that work (UDGPA) in the program area.

The graduation and program GPAs specified below are University minimum requirements; individual faculties and departments may, with senate approval, have higher requirements.

In the event of repeated courses, only the higher grade is used in these GPA calculations.

 

Overall minimum requirements for all courses (CGPA) and all upper division courses (UDGPA) completed at Simon Fraser University

joint honors degree*

3.00

honors degree*

3.00

general degrees

2.00

certificates

2.00

post baccalaureate diplomas

2.50

Program GPAs

Program plan minimum requirements for all courses and for all upper division courses completed in the program area

joint honors*

3.00

honors*

3.00

joint majors

2.00

major

2.00

extended minors

2.00

minors

2.00

*students who have obtained a GPA of 3.5 or greater in both the graduation and program categories specified above will receive the designation of joint honors or honors (first class).

Convocation

Convocation is held in June and October. Students who fulfil degree requirements during the fall or spring terms may attend the June ceremony. Graduates of the summer term attend the October ceremony.

Application for Graduation/Granting of Degree, Certificate or Diploma

Each candidate for a degree, certificate, or diploma must formally apply for graduation.

For information about how to apply to graduate and for specific deadlines or ceremony dates, please visit http://www.sfu.ca/convocation.

Notification of Award by Senate

Following senate approval, each student who has been awarded a degree, certificate or diploma will receive a letter of confirmation from the registrar.

 

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