Fall 2017 - CMPT 106 D100

Applied Science, Technology and Society (3)

Class Number: 7521

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    SUR 3310, Surrey

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 15, 2017
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    SUR 3310, Surrey

  • Instructor:

    Harinder Khangura
    khangura@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-7575
    Office: SUR 4116
  • Prerequisites:

    Corequisite: CMPT 105W or MSE 101W.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Reviews the different modes of thought characteristic of science, engineering and computing. Examines the histories and chief current research issues in these fields. Considers the ethical and social responsibilities of engineering and computing work. Students with credit for ENSC 100, ENSC 106 or MSE 102 cannot take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

Surveys the historical development of computing, engineering, and the sciences. Evaluates the impact of computing and engineering on the environment and on global development. Discusses ethical issues in computing and engineering in the light of selected case studies, including the Therac 25 incident. Examines several current research issues in computing and engineering, such as nanotechnology and artificial intelligence. During the semester, students work on a practical design project in small teams. Paired with a writing course in which students write a substantial research paper.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Topics:
- History of computing and engineering
- Modes of thinking in the sciences, computing, and engineering
- Ethical responsibilities of computing and engineering professionals
- Technology and the developing world
- Outstanding problems in computing and engineering
- Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
- Software and engineering project management
- Speculation on prospects for the future

Grading

  • Group design project, Attendance/Seminar Participation, In-Class Quizzes, Final Paper. A more detailed marking scheme will be made available during the first lecture.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

The Betterment of the Human Condition 2/E, John Jones, Pearson, 2011
ISBN: 9781256098775

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS