Fall 2017 - IAT 309W D100

Writing Methods for Research (3)

Class Number: 5107

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    SUR 3240, Surrey

  • Prerequisites:

    48 units including a lower division W course.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Develops critical thinking and writing strategies adaptable to professional communications in design, media arts and technology. Writing.

COURSE DETAILS:

IAT309W prepares students for the demands of a hi-tech workforce that values collaboration among artists, engineers, designers, and project managers– professional writers who must be able to adapt their communications effectively to meet the needs of experts and lay audiences.

This course helps students to develop critical thinking, research, and writing strategies that can be adapted to a wide range of professional communication situations related to design, media and technology. Through the exploration of research methods and contexts, students recognize written documents as applications of critical thinking and communication principles and learn to shift content, as well as authorial voice and tone, across modalities of writing. Students use low-stakes and high-stakes writing activities to identify the needs of an audience and to apply the appropriate writing strategies required to avoid audience resistance. Regular feedback and weekly workshops and peer reviews allow students to practice revision strategies that will enhance skill development and professional writing image.

Over the course of the term, students will develop a critical writing portfolio and a major research project. Both signature projects will demonstrate each student’s ability to incorporate the analytical skills, planning and research skills and revision skills practiced throughout the course.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Course Objectives

By actively participating in IAT309W, students should be able to do the following:

Adapt and apply appropriate critical thinking and communication strategies across a variety of writing situations (such as reflective, expository, analytical, and persuasive).

Recognize written documents as applications of critical thinking and communication principles.

Recognize that written documents are intended to target specific audiences to evoke specific responses.

Identify the expectations of a target audience and the objectives of a written document based on the rhetorical nature of that document (voice, tone, style, organization, conventions).

Apply audience invention, planning and iterative revision processes to various writing tasks for a comprehensive research project.

Project a strong professional image through their written communication.

Learning Outcomes

This will allow students to:

Apply critical thinking skills to produce academic/professional forms of writing.

Apply content guidelines, theoretical concepts, and design frameworks to produce academic/professional forms of writing.

Demonstrate a capacity to make an argument backed up by research, evidence and warranted claims.

Demonstrate a strong professional image through clear written communication.

Integrate instructor and peer feedback to develop and refine an argument.

Design a research project using an iterative planning, drafting and revision process.

Grading

  • Major Research Project: Draft 30%
  • Major Research Project: Revision 30%
  • Small Stakes Writing Exercises 40%

Materials

INSTRUCTOR NOTES:

Delivery Method: Lecture (LEC)

This course employs the following teaching & learning approaches:

Short lectures

Writing workshops and peer review sessions

Regular feedback on written work

Revision of written work

Weekly readings and assignments

Guest speakers

REQUIRED READING:

"Design Research:  Methods & Perspectives" (2003) by Brenda Laurel, Peter Lunenfeld; MIT Press

Note:  It is recommended that students purchase this book through an online retailer before the semester begins in order to obtain the book in a timely manner for the first week of class.
ISBN: 978062122634

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS