Fall 2018 - LBST 101 D100

Introducing Labour Studies (3)

Class Number: 2066

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    BLU 10921, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 5, 2018
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    SWH 10041, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Kendra Strauss
    kstrauss@sfu.ca
    Office: AQ 6220
    Office Hours: TU 13:00-14:20; WE 09:00-10:00

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to key concepts necessary for understanding the character and organization of work in contemporary society. The discussion of such issues as how our society decides who works, what the work will be, and under what conditions people work, will be situated in the context of current debates, trends and issues. Breadth-Social Sciences.

COURSE DETAILS:

Introduction to key concepts necessary for understanding the character and organization of work in contemporary society. The discussion of such issues as how our society decides who works, what the work will be, and under what conditions people work, will be situated in the context of current debates, trends and issues.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand basic structure of work under capitalism,
  2. Understand how wage labour has evolved and how it is organized in Canada today,
  3. Analyze the relationship between capitalism and colonialism, and understand the implications for Indigenous peoples,
  4. Understand how labour movements have developed and the role of unions in Canada today,
  5. Critically assess concepts like inequality and precarity, and apply them to understanding working peoples experiences of the economy.

Grading

  • Attendance and participation 10%
  • Writing assignment 10%
  • Midterm exam 30%
  • Essay outline with annotated bibliography 10%
  • Invigilated open-book exam 40%

NOTES:

All assignments in this course must be completed for a final grade to be assigned.  The Morgan Centre for Labour Studies follows SFU policy in relation to grading practices, grade appeals (Policy T 20.01) and academic honesty and misconducted procedures (S10.01-S10.04).  It is the responsibility of the students to inform themselves of the content of these policies available on the SFU website: http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/teaching.html.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Jackson, A. and Thomas, M. P. (2010). Work and Labour in Canada: Critical Issues, (3rd Ed.). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.
ISBN: 978-1-551309576

Additional readings available on Canvas or on Library reserve.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS