Spring 2018 - EASC 104 J100

Geohazards - Earth in Turmoil (3)

Class Number: 1958

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
    HCC 2270, Vancouver

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 12, 2018
    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    Kevin Cameron
    kjc@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-4703
    Office: TASC 2 Room 7530.2

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to the range of geological hazards that affect the Earth, the environment and humanity. Topics covered will include the hazards and risks related to volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides and avalanches, tsunamis, geomagnetic storms and other potentially cataclysmic events. The forecasting and possible mitigation of these geohazards will also be investigated. Students may not take EASC 104 for credit towards EASC major or minor program requirements. Students with credit for GEOG 312 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

COURSE DETAILS:

General: REQUIREMENT DESIGNATION: B-Sci
EASC 104 is an introduction to the science of natural hazards (geohazards). Geohazards are Earth-surface processes that have direct and often sudden and violent impacts on humanity. This course uses geohazards as a means of exploring fundamental earth processes and phenomena, while touching on forecasting, mitigation, and adaptation.

Course Topics:
1. Introduction to natural hazards and risk
2. Earth structure and dynamics
3. Earthquakes
4. Volcanoes
5. Tsunami and coastal processes
6. Hurricanes and cyclones
7. Flooding
8. Mass wasting
9. Snow and avalanches
10. Soils and subsidence
11. Severe weather and wildfires
12. Climate change

Course Organisation: One 3-hour lecture each week.

Grading

  • Midterm Test 1 25%
  • Midterm Test 2 25%
  • Final Exam 50%

NOTES:

NOTE: Students with credit for GEOG 312-4 cannot take this course for further credit

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Something to take notes with (i.e. pen and paper, or laptop / tablet)

REQUIRED READING:

Keller, E.A.; DeVecchio, D.E.; Clague, J.J.; Natural Hazards, 3rd Canadian Edition, Pearson, 2015. (paperback)
ISBN: 978-0-13-307650-9

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS