Spring 2018 - EASC 302 D100

Sedimentary Petrology (3)

Class Number: 6990

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
    TASC2 7530, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 12, 2018
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    James Maceachern
    jmaceach@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-5388
    Office: TASC 1 Room 7235
  • Prerequisites:

    STAT 201 or 270, EASC 201 and 205. All with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Description and classification, field and microscopic identification of sedimentary rocks; petrogenesis and paleoenvironmental reconstruction.

COURSE DETAILS:

General:
EASC 302 is a course that concentrates on the composition, texture, diagenesis and depositional origin (petrology) of sedimentary rocks. The course outlines the various classification schemes for siliciclastic and carbonate rocks, microscopic/optical techniques for their study, and demonstrates practical applications of sedimentary petrology principles and theories.

Course Topics:

  1. The study of siliciclastic rocks, including compositional and textural classification systems, diagenesis, optical analysis of common clastic rock suites in thin section, and field identification.
  2. The study of chemically precipitated (limestone, dolostone and evaporite) rocks, including compositional and textural classification systems, diagenesis, optical analysis of carbonate rock suites in thin section, and field identification.
  3. The study of organic rocks (e.g., coal) (time permitting).
Course Organization:
Two 90-min lecture class and one 3-hour laboratory class per week.

Grading

  • Written Laboratory Assignments 20%
  • Mid-Term Theory Exam I 20%
  • Mid-Term Laboratory Exam I 20%
  • Mid-Term Laboratory Exam II 20%
  • Mid-Term Theory Exam II 20%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Tucker, M.E., 2001. Sedimentary Petrology (Third Edition). Blackwell Science Ltd., UK
ISBN: 978-0-632-05735-1

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS