Spring 2018 - EASC 311 D100

Metamorphic Petrology (3)

Class Number: 1955

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    RCB 5125, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 15, 2018
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    Brendan Dyck
    1 778 782-5389
  • Prerequisites:

    Pre/Co-requisite: EASC 301 and 302. All with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Investigation of the physicochemical processes responsible for the origin of metamorphic rocks. Integrated study of the mineralogy, textures and phase relations through examination of hand sample and petrographic thin sections.

COURSE DETAILS:

General: Investigation of the physicochemical processes responsible for the origin of metamorphic rocks. Topics covered include: the identification and classification of metamorphic rocks; the relationship between the timing of mineral growth and deformation fabrics in the context of changing P-T conditions and crustal processes; application of the principles of equilibrium thermodynamics to evaluate the formation and stability of metamorphic mineral assemblages; phase diagrams; distinguishing mineralogical differences that are the result of variations in bulk rock composition versus those that result from differences in pressure, temperature, and/or fluid conditions; using mineral and bulk-rock chemical analyses with thermodynamic calculations to predict equilibrium temperatures and pressures.

Grading

  • Lab Assignments 15%
  • Final Lab Test 20%
  • Lecture Mid-Term 25%
  • Final Lecture Exam 40%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

A hand lens should be brought to labs. 

REQUIRED READING:

“Principles of Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology”; John D. Winter; 2nd Edition 2010; Pearson Prentice Hall
ISBN: 978-0-32-159257-6

RECOMMENDED READING:

“Introduction to Mineralogy” 2nd Edition; Nesse, William D; 2012; Oxford University Press (This text is also used for EASC 202 and 205.)
ISBN: 978-0-19-982738-1

“Principles of Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology”; Philpotts A, Ague, J: 2nd Edition  2009; Prentice-Hall
ISBN: 978-0-521-88006-0

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS