Fall 2019 - EASC 421 D100

Volcanology (3)

Class Number: 1517

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    SSCK 7654, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 12, 2019
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    AQ 5008, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Glyn Williams-Jones
    glynwj@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-3306
    Office: TASC 1 Room 7225
  • Prerequisites:

    EASC 207. Co/Prerequisite: EASC 301. All with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to physical and chemical volcanology through a comprehensive examination of volcanic eruptions and their consequences. The main topics covered are the rheological properties of magmas and lavas, structure of volcanic landforms, eruption dynamics, monitoring and hazard assessment, the emplacement of volcanic deposits, extraterrestrial volcanism and the effects of eruptions on the environment.

COURSE DETAILS:

General:
This course is designed to give students an introduction to physical and chemical volcanology through a comprehensive examination of volcanic eruptions and their consequences. The main topics covered are the rheological properties of magmas and lavas, structure of volcanic landforms, eruption dynamics, monitoring and hazard assessment, the emplacement of volcanic deposits, extraterrestrial volcanism and the effects of eruptions on the environment.

Course Topics:
·  Properties of magmas and lavas
·  Volcanic eruption dynamics
·  Structure of volcanic landforms
·  Types of volcanic deposits and emplacement mechanisms 
·  The hazards, monitoring techniques and mitigation of volcanic events
·  Extraterrestrial volcanism and environmental effects of large eruptions

Course Organization: One 2-hour lecture and 3-hour lab per week. One compulsory field trip – end of Sept., exact date TBD

Grading

  • Lab/Field Assignments 20%
  • In Class Volcanic Hazard Simulation 15%
  • Mid-term Exam 25%
  • Final Exam 40%

NOTES:

Be aware that during the field trip there will be period of hiking close to cliffs and crossing roads with busy traffic. Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Further details regarding safety, food, housing and field supplies will be discussed prior to the field trip. There will be a supplementary fee. ($40)

Materials

RECOMMENDED READING:

“Volcanism” by Hans-Ulrich Schmincke, 2004, Springer, New York, 329 p.,
ISBN: 978-3-540-43650-8

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS