Fall 2019 - MATH 310 D100

Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3)

Class Number: 4070

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
    SRYE 2016, Surrey

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 11, 2019
    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
    SUR 3310, Surrey

  • Instructor:

    Masood Masjoody
  • Prerequisites:

    MATH 152; or MATH 155/158 with a grade of at least B, MATH 232 or 240.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

First-order differential equations, second- and higher-order linear equations, series solutions, introduction to Laplace transform, systems and numerical methods, applications in the physical, biological and social sciences. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

  • First Order differential equations
  • Second- and higher-order linear equations
  • Systems of first-order equations 
  • The Laplace transform
  • Introduction to numerical methods and nonlinear systems
  • Applications in the physical, biological and social sciences

Grading

  • Assignment Quizzes (Based on online homework and additional problems, 10 homework quizzes, weighted equally with lowest mark dropped)) 20%
  • Midterm Exam 30%
  • Final Exam 50%

NOTES:

THE INSTRUCTOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE ANY OF THE ABOVE INFORMATION.
Students should be aware that they have certain rights to confidentiality concerning the return of course papers and the posting of marks.
Please pay careful attention to the options discussed in class at the beginning of the semester

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems
Loose Leaf Hard Cover + WileyPlus

William E. Boyce, Richard C. DiPrima, Douglas B. Meade
11th Edition; 2017
Wiley
ISBN: 9781119454465

OR

Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems
Vital Source E-Text + WileyPlus

William E. Boyce and Richard C. DiPrima
11th Edition; 2017
Wiley
ISBN: 9781119454496

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS