Summer 2019 - EDUC 467 D100

Curriculum and Instruction in Teaching English as an Additional Language (4)

Class Number: 5174

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    EDB 7608, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    60 units plus one of the following: six units of EDUC course work; or completion of EDUC 401/402; or admission to the Certificate in Teaching ESL program, or co-requisite EDUC 403.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Designed for prospective and beginning teachers to learn more about theory, research, and practice in teaching English as an additional language (EAL) in today's multilingual classrooms. Exploring an integrated approach working with learners to develop language skills through designing and delivering curriculum, instruction and assessment.

COURSE DETAILS:

The course is designed for prospective and beginning teachers to learn more about theory, research, and practice in teaching English as an additional language (EAL) in today's multilingual classrooms. Through readings, hands-on assignments, group presentations, and discussions, we will explore an integrated approach with both young and adult EAL learners to develop language skills through designing and delivering curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Grading

  • Active Learning 15%
  • Assignment 1: Language Learning Auto-Biography 5%
  • Assignment 2: Ethnographic Observation 10%
  • Assignment 3: Critical Reader Response 15%
  • Assignment 4: Group Project 25%
  • Critical Reflections and related Lesson Plan(s) 30%

NOTES:

Grading breakdown is subject to change.  There is no final exam for this course.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Coelho, E. (2016). Adding English: A guide to teaching in multilingual classrooms (2 ed.). Toronto, ON: Pippin Publishing.

ISBN: 9781487520496

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS