Summer 2019 - GEOG 104 D100

Climate Change, Water, and Society (3)

Class Number: 5896

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
    SSCB 9201, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 13, 2019
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    WMC 3520, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Brendan Hunt
    Office: TBA
    Office Hours: TBA

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An examination of climate change, its interaction with water availability, and how humans cope with these altered circumstances. Students who have completed GEOG 102 prior to the fall 2011 term may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course examines the causes of  and evidence for climate change, considers the impacts on natural and human systems, and explores options to mitigate and/or adapt to changing climatic conditions. We will also discuss the governance of climate change, and investigate why this issue is still a highly controversial topic in politics and the media, despite overwhelming scientific consensus that Earth’s climate system is warming.  

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

·         Develop tools to examine climate change from multidisciplinary perspectives, including its environmental, socio-economic and political dimensions
·         Analyze climate data and evaluate how interactions between climate system components lead to climate variability that impacts human societies
·         Develop enhanced skills in science literacy, collaboration, and communication

Grading

  • In-class activities 10%
  • Reflection assignments 5%
  • Poster Presentations 15%
  • Midterm 30%
  • Final 40%

NOTES:

Grade structure subject to change

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Weekly readings will be assigned and made available on Canvas.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS