Summer 2019 - HUM 101W J100

Introduction to the Humanities (3)

Class Number: 3069

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
    HCC 1325, Vancouver

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 9, 2019
    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
    HCC 1530, Vancouver

  • Instructor:

    Wayne Knights
  • Prerequisites:

    .

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to issues and concepts central to the study of the Humanities. Through exposure to primary materials drawn from different periods and disciplines, students will become acquainted with a range of topics and ideas relating to the study of human values and human experience. Equivalent Courses: HUM101 Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course is an introduction to some of the issues and concepts central to the study of the Humanities. Through exposure to primary materials drawn from different periods and disciplines, students will become acquainted with a range of topics and ideas relating to the study of human values and human experience.  

We will look at several examples of the writing and re-imagining of texts, exploring ways in which historical context and contemporary problems disclose themes and concerns emblematic of the Humanities. In broad outline, the ancient myth of Medea is resurrected by an East German writer in the context of Cold War and the rise of feminism; the controversial Biblical text Job is transported to the 18th century in order to explore the role of God and human responsibility; and a modern classic of alienation and freedom set in colonial Algeria is interrogated through the lens of the Algerian experience after the war of independence. Students will write three essays comparing and contrasting these texts.

Grading

  • 3 Essays 75%
  • Exams 15%
  • Participation 10%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Euripides, Medea

Christa Wolf, Medea

Book of Job

Voltaire, Candide (includes the exchange with Rousseau on the Lisbon Earthquake)

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Albert Camus, The Outsider

Kamel Daoud, The Meursault Investigation

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS