Summer 2019 - POL 448 D100

Selected Topics in International Relations (4)

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE AND SUS DEV

Class Number: 4608

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
    WMC 3517, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

Description

COURSE DETAILS:

Selected Topics: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 


 This course examines the institutions, processes, laws and regulations created to promote ‘environmental’ conservation and achieve ‘sustainable development’ at the global and regional levels. Global governance of the ‘environment’ and ‘sustainable development’ encompasses a wide range of global and regional institutions, laws, regulations, and practices, governmental and non-governmental, created in the effort to govern the impact of ‘divers’ associated with ‘development’ on the earth’s complex social-ecological systems.  The course focuses on identifying key challenges to effective governance and assessing the prospects for sustainable solutions.  In the contemporary period, many of these challenges assume a Global North-South dimension and arise from disagreements over key organizing principles, over substantive values and goals, and over property rights and the distribution of costs and benefits; issues further complicated by ethical questions pertaining to environmental justice. The course is divided into two parts. Part one discusses different perspectives on the ‘environment’ and ‘sustainable development’, assesses their implications for governance, and outlines the evolution of major governance mechanisms.  We also discuss issues of (in)justice and (in)equity as they pertain to the ‘environment’ and ‘sustainable development’, focusing on notions of distributive, procedural and intergenerational justice, and deontological and consequentialist ethics.  Part two examines several contemporary issues including ozone depletion, climate change, biodiversity, fresh water, food security, population/migration, and hazardous waste.   We examine the major drivers of change in each of these areas, assess critically the governance mechanisms, and explore specific cases that embody them. 

There will be two four-hour seminars each week.

Intersession.

Grading

  • Seminar Presentation 20%
  • Seminar Participation 10%
  • Final Exam (Take home) 35%
  • Research Proposal & Essay 35%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

All the required readings are available electronically on the course Canvas site.

Department Undergraduate Notes:

The Department of Political Science strictly enforces a policy on plagiarism.
For details, see http://www.sfu.ca/politics/undergraduate/program/related_links.html and click on “Plagiarism and Intellectual Dishonesty” .

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS