Fall 2022 - MATH 345 D100

Introduction to Graph Theory (3)

Class Number: 4134

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    WMC 2503, Burnaby

    We, Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    WMC 3220, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 16, 2022
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    WMC 2532, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    MACM 201 (with a grade of at least B-).

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Fundamental concepts, trees and distances, matchings and factors, connectivity and paths, network flows, integral flows. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

Topics

  • Graph Basics
  • Trees
  • Matchings
  • Connectivity
  • Directed Graphs
  • Advanced topics (time permitting)

Grading

  • In-class Assignment Solution Presentation 5%
  • Project 10%
  • Assignments (10 assignments, equally weighted, best 9 out of 10) 15%
  • Midterms 30%
  • Final Exam 40%

NOTES:

THE INSTRUCTOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE ANY OF THE ABOVE INFORMATION. 
Students should be aware that they have certain rights to confidentiality concerning the return of course papers and the posting of marks. 
Please pay careful attention to the options discussed in class at the beginning of the semester.

REQUIREMENTS:

This course is delivered in person, on campus. Should public health guidelines recommend limits on in person gatherings, this course may include virtual meetings. As such, all students are recommended to have access to strong and reliable internet, the ability to scan documents (a phone app is acceptable) and access to a webcam and microphone (embedded in a computer is sufficient). 

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

No textbook required.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Introduction to Graph Theory (Classic Version)
Douglas B. West
2/E, Pearson
ISBN: 9780131437371

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html