Fall 2022 - NUSC 344 D100

Nucleosynthesis and Distribution of the Elements (3)

Class Number: 2869

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu, Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    AQ 5048, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 9, 2022
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    WMC 3511, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    Completion of 60 units in a science program, including first year calculus, chemistry and physics.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Formation and distribution of the chemical elements in the early universe, in present stellar environments and in the solar system; elemental abundances and isotopic ratios; and radiometric chronology techniques. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

3 lecture hours/week; 1 tutorial hour/week

This course is a quantitative introduction to the nuclear and astrophysical processes by which the chemical elements have been and are formed and distributed throughout the universe. Topics include review of nuclear science concepts, introduction to stellar thermonuclear reactions and neutron capture processes, big bang nucleosynthesis, stellar structure and evolution, the cosmic abundances of elements and isotopes, the origin of the light elements, radioactive cosmochronology, and the techniques of experimental nuclear astrophysics.

This course can be applied towards fulfilling the requirements of the Nuclear Science Minor program.

Grading

  • Homework 20%
  • Midterm Exam 30%
  • Final Exam 50%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Choppin, Liljenzin, Rydberg & Ekberg. Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry. 4th Edition. 2013. Publisher: Academic Press.

Website: http://jol.liljenzin.se/BOOK.HTM

RECOMMENDED READING:

Claus E. Rolfs & William S. Rodney. Cauldrons in the Cosmos. 2005. Publisher: University of Chicago Press.

Richard N. Boyd. An Introduction to Nuclear Astrophysics. 2008. Publisher: University of Chicago Press.

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html