Spring 2023 - CMNS 423 D100

Globalization: Cultural Issues (4)

Class Number: 1362

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
    SSCK 8669, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    75 units including CMNS 221 or 223 (or 223W), with a minimum grade of C-; and two CMNS upper division courses with a minimum grade of C-; and CGPA of 3.00 or higher.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Explores the cultural dimension of global flows of capital and data, comparing, on the one hand, the consequences of increased mobility and, on the other hand, the drive towards increased control and immobility of displaced populations. Examines how the tightening of national boundaries and economic and political processes of globalization have left populations "placeless" whether because of war, environmental disaster, etc. Looks at the ways in which these groups make sense of their displacement and immobility through narratives, stories and images, focusing on issues of power and the destruction of social life. Students who have taken CMNS 487 in terms 1051, 1057 and 1081 cannot take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course explores the cultural dimension of global flows of capital and data, comparing, on the one hand, the consequences of increased mobility and, on the other hand, the drive towards increased control and immobility of displaced populations.. We will examine how the simultaneous processes of tightening of national boundaries and economic and political processes of globalization have left populations "placeless" whether because of war, economic inequality, environmental disaster, etc. We will also explore the impacts of cultural globalization on cultural identities of populations worldwide and explore the complexities involved in this process. We will look at the ways in which various groups make sense of these ongoing transformations, and discuss issues such as cultural hybridity, cosmopolitanism, humanitarianism, displacement, belonging and immobility by looking at it through narratives, stories, and images, focusing on issues of power and the destruction of social life.

In the first half of the course, we will focus on various approaches and counterapproaches to understanding globalization and global cultural flows, as well as cover debates around the nature and future of globalization. In the second half of the course, we will primarily focus on how globalization impacts global inequality, migration, displacement, and injustice. The course will introduce existing narratives around migration, citizenship and refugees and will position them within the discourse of cultural globalization.

Class Format:
The course is organized as one 3-hour seminar per week. It is expected that students attend every seminar and come prepared having read all assigned readings and viewed all assigned viewables. The seminar will be divided up between a short interactive lecture, a discussion of the weeks materials, and a brief screening. Participation in course discussions is essential for success in this course.

Grading

  • Attendance and Participation 20%
  • Case Presentation 20%
  • Reading Notes (3 x 5%) 15%
  • Paper Proposal 10%
  • Final Paper 35%

REQUIREMENTS:

Unless otherwise instructed, all assignments will be submitted on Canvas by 11:59pm on the day indicated on the syllabus. Late submissions will be penalized 10% per calendar day. Assignments will not be accepted after 2 weeks past the due date. If you need an extension on an assignment, consult with your TA at least a week before the original due date. Extensions will be granted on a case by case basis. Tutorial participation and lab exercises cannot be made up.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

All readings will be available digitally in the ‘files’ section on Canvas.

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html