Spring 2024 - PSYC 357 D100

Adulthood and Aging (3)

Class Number: 7734

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Jan 8 – Apr 12, 2024: Tue, 8:30–11:20 a.m.
    Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Sherrie Atwood
    atwood@sfu.ca
    Office: RCB 4201
    Office Hours: Tuesday 11:30am - 12:30pm
  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 201 and 250 or acceptance into the diploma program in gerontology.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Considers human development from young adulthood to old age. Included are theories of adult development and aging; environmental and biological factors in aging; and the effects of aging on sensation, perception, learning, cognition, personality, psychopathology, and social relations.

COURSE DETAILS:

The purpose of this course is to provide an orientation to aging processes in adulthood. Students will be introduced to basic theoretical models, research methods, and current information on the psychology of adulthood and aging and shown how these concepts can be applied to understanding development across the lifespan. Topics to be covered include: methods in aging research, physical and sensory changes, neurobiology of aging, chronic disease and health, dementia (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease) cognition (e.g., intelligence, language, memory), personality, work and retirement, relationships, mental health issues and treatment, successful aging, and death and dying.

Grading

  • Project Proposal: 5%
  • Exam 1: 20%
  • Exam 2: 20%
  • Exam 3: 20%
  • Project: 35%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Whitbourne, S.K., Whitbourne, S.B., & Konnert, C. (2022). Adult development and aging: Biopsychosocial perspectives (2nd Canadian Edition). NY: Wiley
ISBN: 9781119506973

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html