Summer 2024 - IS 302 D100

Humanitarian Intervention: An Introduction (4)

Class Number: 2780

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
    Vancouver

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Jun 20, 2024
    Thu, 2:30–2:30 p.m.
    Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    45 units.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Explores how international actors respond to humanitarian emergencies, such as famine, displacement, and genocide. Examines the political, legal, and ethical challenges of humanitarian action by focusing on contemporary cases and on key types of response, from the delivery of aid to sanctions and the use of military force. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

COURSE DETAILS:

In 2024, the global community faces massive humanitarian crises in Afghanistan, Chad, DRC, Ethiopia, Occupied Gaza, Haiti, Myanmar, Syria, Sudan, and Yemen — as well as a dozen other situations of dire need— covering some 300 million people.

This course will explore how various international actors respond to humanitarian emergencies, from famine to displacement and genocide. What are the ethical, legal, and political challenges at hand? How do we determine who the appropriate/legitimate interveners are—and is this about “duty” or “right” to intervene? Why do critics regard such intervention as imperialism in disguise? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the ”Responsibility to Protect” doctrine (which Canada strongly advocated)? We will focus on contemporary cases and key types of response, including delivery of aid, sanctions, and the use of military force. Multimedia resources will supplement our texts throughout this interdisciplinary course.

Grading

  • Class presentation 20%
  • Participation 10%
  • Review Paper 30%
  • Final Exam 40%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Weiss, Thomas G. Humanitarian Intervention.  3rd edition. Polity Press, 2016.                ISBN: 978-1-509-50732-0 (pbk); 978-1-509-50735-1 (e-bk).
ISBN: 978-1-509-50732-0

RECOMMENDED READING:

Pattison, James. Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility To Protect: Who Should Intervene?  Oxford University Press, 2010.

Additional readings will be posted on Canvas.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html