Fall 2022 - PHYS 881 G100

Special Topics I (3)

Non-eq Stat Mech & Stoch Phys

Class Number: 4413

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    RCB 5125, Burnaby

Description

COURSE DETAILS:

Probability and information theory
Stochastic processes: stationary, Markov, and one-step processes
Stochastic models: Master equation, Fokker-Planck equation, Langevin equation, stochastic differential equations
Applications: random walks, chemical reactions, first-passage, and Kramers problems
Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and stochastic thermodynamics


Grading

  • Homework 60%
  • Research proposal 25%
  • Final exam 15%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Textbooks (recommended):

N. van Kampen, Stochastic Processes in Physics and Chemistry, 3rd ed. (2007).  
C. Gardiner, Stochastic Methods: A Handbook for the Natural and Social Sciences, 4th ed. (2009).    
R. Zwanzig, Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics (2001).
Peliti & S. Pigolotti, Stochastic Thermodynamics: An Introduction (2021).



*Students can purchase books from online retailers if e-books unavailable from SFU Bookstore

*Computer and Internet Access Required

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html