Summer 2022 - WL 104W D100

Modern World Literatures (3)

Class Number: 4704

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    AQ 5030, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 10, 2022
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    BLU 10921, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Introduces ways of comparing modern world literatures across time and space. May explore topics such as revolution, technology, or existentialism. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

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In this course, we will consider several texts, a play and film that take up the complex questions of identity, what it means to be human and the desire for community. What does it mean to be an outsider versus a member of community? Is conformity the price of inclusion? How do people retrain their humanity and sense of identity in the midst of oppression and circumstances that threaten their humanity? And how do these questions about existence vary with geography and time? In consideration of these issues, we will look texts that portray a young African girl who opts for exile from her community rather than conform, a Japanese woman who embraces conformity to overcome her feelings of being an outsider, and a ten year old Vietnamese refugee who struggles to maintain a sense of identity despite being stateless. We will also view the film Parasite, which considers social and economic outsiders and the lengths to which they will go to survive as well as a dramatization of the story of Frankenstein and his monster, who longs for community and acceptance. We will be viewing the recent National Theater dramatization of Frankenstein (2020) in which two actors – Johnny Lee Miller and Benedict Cumberbatch -- alternate playing the role of the creature and Dr. Frankenstein on subsequent performances.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

  • Developing critical and analytical skills
  • Formulating arguments based on textual analysis
  • Writing well
  • Expressing ideas and arguments orally

Grading

  • Essay 1 (5 pages) due June 9 15%
  • Essay 2 (8 pages) due July 7 + rewrite due August 4 (15% + 20%) 35%
  • Midterm exam 15%
  • Final exam 25%
  • Participation / Group work 10%

NOTES:

COURSE POLICY: The SFU Code of Academic Integrity and Good Conduct (policy S 10.01) will be enforced. Unexcused absences from class will adversely affect the final grade. Email me if you become ill. According to the SFU Faculty Association: “Instructors will be able to remove masks while teaching, provided appropriate physical distancing can be maintained.”

COURSE SCHEDULE:

Week

Date

Reading/Viewing

1

May 12

Introduction/Convenience Store Woman, Essay Introductions and Thesis Statements

2

May 19

Convenience Store Woman, Avoiding Plagiarism

3

May 26

From a Crooked Rib, Body Paragraphs

4

June 2

From a Crooked Rib, MLA Formatting

5

June 9

Short Essay Due , Frankenstein

6

June 16

Frankenstein

7

June 23

Midterm, Frankenstein

8

June 30

Ru

9

July 7

Draft Major Essay Due, Ru

10

July 14

Ru

11

July 21

Parasite

12

July 28

Parasite, Marked Essays returned

13

Aug. 4

Final Essay Due, Final Exam Review

Final Exam

T.B.A.

Final Exam Period Aug. 10-20

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

  • Nuruddin Farah, From a Crooked Rib, Riverhead, ISBN-13: ‎ 978-0143037262
  • Sayaka Murat, Convenience Store Woman (trans. Ginny Tapley Takemori), Grove, ISBN-13: ‎ 978-0802129628
  • Kim Thúy, Ru (trans. Sheila Fischman), Vintage, ISBN-13: ‎978-0345816146
  • Nick Dear, based on the book by Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, Directed by Danny Boyle, Performances by Benedict Cumberbatch and Johnny Lee Miller. National Theater at Home, 30 April – 8 May, 2020, London, Available online.

Books are available through SFU bookstore, Indigo or Amazon.


Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SUMMER 2022

Teaching at SFU in summer 2022 will involve primarily in-person instruction.  Some courses may be offered through alternative methods (remote, online, blended), and if so, this will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes. 

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote, online, or blended courses study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the summer 2022 term.