Spring 2023 - ECON 809 G100

Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (4)

Class Number: 3232

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    WMC 3611, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    ECON 808.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course covers advanced macroeconomic theory topics. Emphasis will be placed on current research techniques. Topics covered may include: capital and growth theory, real business cycle models, models of fiat money, asset pricing models, endogenous growth models, development traps, macroeconomic complementarities, co-ordination failures, and adaptive behavior in macroeconomic models. Students with credit for ECON 806 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

The class will cover topics related to open-economy macroeconomics and models with incomplete markets and heterogeneous agents. This course emphasizes computational tools in quantitative macroeconomics.

 

Grading

  • Class participation 10%
  • Midterm Exam 40%
  • Assignments 30%
  • Presentation 20%

Materials

RECOMMENDED READING:

Ljungqvist and Sargent: Recursive Macroeconomic Theory (4th edition). 2018, MIT Press.


REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html