Spring 2023 - ECON 842 G100

International Monetary Economics (4)

Class Number: 5569

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 4:30 PM – 7:20 PM
    WMC 3611, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Balance of payments theory, foreign exchange theory, and adjustment processes. A range of applied problems will be dealt with such as the operation of exchange rates, analysis of exchange rate systems, exchange control and the processes of short and long term capital movements in international trade.

COURSE DETAILS:

The goal of this course is to stimulate and initiate innovative graduate research in the field. Among the topics covered are: (1) business cycle facts around the world, (2) open-economy business cycle models, (3) international trade and exchange rate, and (4) financial crisis and sovereign default.

 

Grading

  • Class participation 10%
  • Midterm 40%
  • Assignments 30%
  • Presentation 20%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Uribe and Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe, Princeton University Press, 2017, “Open economy

macroeconomics”.


RECOMMENDED READING:

Foundations of International Macroeconomics, Maurice Obstfeld and Kenneth Rogoff, MIT Press, 1996


REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html