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Business | Beedie School of Business Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2024

Business Major

Bachelor of Business Administration

Students admitted to the Beedie School of Business for the Fall 2017 term onwards must complete the Business Foundation Program within their first year.

During the first 60 units of the program, students will complete mainly non-business courses, which fall under three categories of courses. The first category consists of lower division requirements that are mainly foundation courses and prepares students for more advanced upper division business courses. The second category consists of courses completed to meet university requirements in writing, quantitative and breadth areas, the Beedie School of Business non-business elective requirement, as well as a minimum of 36 units, outside of the Beedie School of Business*. These first two categories should be completed during the first 60 units.

In the third category, students choose courses that are based on intellectual interest or to achieve academic goals.

The last 60 units of the degree program consist of the core upper division business courses, at least one area of concentration, and lower and upper division electives. In total, students will complete a minimum of 120 units, which must include at least 45 units of upper division coursework.

Students are also required to complete the Business Career Passport program, which consists of six workshops to prepare them for their careers.

*Courses not labelled as BUS or BUEC that are completed as part of the lower division requirements may be used toward the 36 units outside business.

Admission Requirements

Please refer to the admission requirements section.

Grade Requirements

In addition to normal university grade point average requirements, the Beedie School of Business requires a minimum 2.30 overall SFU Business course grade point average for entry into all 300 and 400 division business courses.

A minimum 2.30 overall SFU Business course grade point average is required for graduation from a business major, joint major, or double degree program.

For a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite, or for a lower division requirement, or for a core course to be accepted in a student’s program in business, a student must have obtained a minimum grade of C- (C minus).

Letters of Permission

The Beedie School of Business does not normally approve letters of permission for students already enrolled at Simon Fraser University.

Program Requirements

Students admitted to the Beedie School of Business for the Fall 2017 term onwards must complete the Business Foundation Program within their first year. Students admitted from high school must complete the Business Foundation Program – High School Stream. Students admitted through internal or external transfer must complete the Business Foundation Program - Transfer Stream. The courses required for each stream can be found under the Business Foundation Program.

Lower Division Requirements

Students must complete all lower division required courses with a minimum C- grade.

Students complete one of

BUS 201 - Introduction to Business (3) ^^

For the Business Administration Major – High School Stream - orients students to the Beedie School of Business and the academic expectations of the program. As a broad introduction to the study of business, students are introduced to the different disciplines and how each relates to global perspective, innovation, and social responsibility. Students explore the integration of these disciplines through experiential learning projects by engaging with, and further developing, interpersonal and collaboration skills in culturally diverse team environments. Prerequisite: This course is only open to approved business administration majors admitted to the faculty through the Business Foundation Program - High School Stream. Corequisite: BUS 100 with a P grade. Students with credit for BUS 130 or BUS 202 may not take this course for further credit. Students with more than 30 units may not take this course.

BUS 202 - Foundations of Business (3) ^^

Business Administration Major – Transfer Stream. Orients students to the Beedie School of Business and the academic expectations of the program. Students explore the different disciplines and specializations within business and tune their prior business knowledge within the context of a global perspective, social responsibility, and innovation. Students explore the integration of these disciplines through experiential learning projects by engaging with, and further developing interpersonal and collaboration skills in culturally diverse team environments. Prerequisite: This course is only open to approved business administration majors, joint majors, or second degree students admitted to the faculty through the Business Foundation Program - Transfer Stream. Corequisite: BUS 100 with a P grade. Students with credit for BUS 130 or BUS 201 may not take this course for further credit.

and all of

BUS 100 - Professional Development - Launch (1) ^^

An intensive program to introduce students to the mission and values of the Beedie School of Business through an immersive experiential learning experience. This program prepares students for success through the development and integration of academic skills and mindsets while building a network necessary for success in academic, social, and career related pursuits. Students must obtain a P grade to successfully complete this course. Prerequisite: This course is only open to approved business administration majors admitted to the faculty through the BBA major - highschool or transfer stream in Fall 2022 and onward.

BUS 217W - Critical Thinking in Business (3)

Examine and review today's global economy through critical analysis of differing perspectives. Develop and improve critical thinking and communication skills appropriate to the business environment. Prerequisite: BUS 201 with a minimum grade of C- and 15 units; OR 45 units and corequisite: BUS 202; OR business administration joint major, joint honours, or double degree students with 45 units; OR data science major with 15 units. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ilia BYKOV
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Matthew Martell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Matthew Martell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D400 Luana Carcano
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D401 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D402 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 237 - Introduction to Business Technology Management (3)

Introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to make full use of business information systems. Demonstrates how information systems are used by organizations to improve productivity and create competitive advantage. Provides hands on training in productivity tools including Excel, Visio, Access and Web design tools. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jie Mein Goh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Jie Mein Goh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 7:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 240 - Introduction to Innovation (3)

An introduction to key innovation concepts and processes, and how innovation is organized in established organizations and start-ups. Students will learn their role as agents of innovation by practicing techniques that help them anticipate opportunities, generate innovative concepts, and implement innovation in established organizations, entrepreneurial ventures and society. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amyn Somani
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Amyn Somani
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 251 - Financial Accounting I (3)

An introduction to financial accounting, including accounting terminology, understanding financial statements, analysis of a business entity using financial statements. Includes also time value of money and a critical review of the conventional accounting system. Prerequisite: 12 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Grant Mowbray
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Grant Mowbray
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 254 - Managerial Accounting I (3)

Theory and methods of cost compilation for managerial planning, control and decision making; the use of budgets and analysis in planning and controlling operations, establishing supervisory and departmental responsibility, and various techniques of measuring results. Prerequisite: BUS 251 with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Weiming Liu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Weiming Liu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Surrey
BUS 272 - Behaviour in Organizations (3)

Theories, concepts and issues in the field of organizational behaviour with an emphasis on individual and team processes. Core topics include employee motivation and performance, stress management, communication, work perceptions and attitudes, decision-making, team dynamics, employee involvement and conflict management. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Thiara
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Sam Thiara
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D205 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 275 - Business in a Sustainable Society (3)

Businesses and business leaders have a key role to play in supporting a sustainable future. In this course, we examine what it means to be a responsible business and how businesses can do their part to be a catalyst for system-level change. We will also consider our own roles in supporting the necessary transition to a more regenerative and reconciled economy. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kam Phung
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Emily Salmon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey

and one of

BUS 232 - Business Statistics (3)

An introduction to business statistics (descriptive and inferential statistics) with a heavy emphasis on applications and the use of EXCEL. Students will be required to use statistical applications to solve business problems. Corequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. Students with credit for BUEC 232 or ECON 233 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Negar Ganjouhaghighi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Negar Ganjouhaghighi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
OP01 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP02 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP05 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
OP06 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
ECON 233 - Introduction to Economic Data and Statistics (3)

Introduces statistical methods, concepts and their application to economic data using both spreadsheets (e.g., Excel) and a specialized statistical programming language such as R. Prerequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157 may be taken concurrently with ECON 233. Students who have taken ECON 333 first may not then take this course for further credit. STAT 270 or BUS 232 will be accepted in lieu of this course.

STAT 270 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic laws of probability, sample distributions. Introduction to statistical inference and applications. Prerequisite: or Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158, with a minimum grade of C-. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Pai
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
OL01 Gamage Perera
Online
OP01 TBD

and one of

BUS 207 - Managerial Economics (3)

Emphasis is upon the relevance of economic models to business decision-making and, in particular, upon the rational analysis of choice alternatives within the firm. Course will include consideration of optimizing techniques and analysis of risk, demand, production and profit in addition to examination of long-term investment decisions and business forecasting. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or ECON 113, ECON 105 or ECON 115, MATH 157, all with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. Students with credit for ECON 201 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mohamad Sadri Karami
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Mohamad Sadri Karami
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
ECON 201 - Microeconomic Theory I: Competitive Behavior (4)

Aspects of microeconomic theory involving competitive markets. Topics include the behavior of households and firms, partial equilibrium analysis of product and factor markets, and general equilibrium. Prerequisite: ECON 103 with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 113 with a minimum grade of A-; ECON 105 with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 115 with a minimum grade of A-; MATH 157 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for ECON 301 may not complete this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Joshua Boitnott
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

ECON 103 - Principles of Microeconomics (4)

The principal elements of theory concerning utility and value, price and costs, factor analysis, productivity, labor organization, competition and monopoly, and the theory of the firm. Students with credit for ECON 200 cannot take ECON 103 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gulriz Barkin
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
ECON 113 - Introduction to Microeconomics (3)

Focused on basic competencies in microeconomics, this course is suitable for business and other students not intending to specialize in economics. Topics include gains from trade, supply and demand, prices, competition and monopoly, market failures, and government policies. Economic literacy is an important part of the course. Students who have taken ECON 103 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

and one of

ECON 105 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4)

The principal elements of theory concerning money and income, distribution, social accounts, public finance, international trade, comparative systems, and development and growth. Students with credit for ECON 205 cannot take ECON 105 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brian Krauth
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
ECON 115 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (3)

Focused on basic competencies in macroeconomics, this course is suitable for business and other students not intending to specialize in economics. Topics include GDP, economic growth, business cycles, unemployment, inflation, money, monetary and fiscal policies, exchange rates, government debt, globalization and trade policy. Economic literacy is an important part of the course. Students who have taken ECON 105 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

and one of

MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mahsa Faizrahnemoon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 154 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Designed for students specializing in the life sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; elementary functions, optimization and approximation methods, and their applications, integration, and differential equations; mathematical models of biological processes and their implementation and analysis using software. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 157 - Calculus I for the Social Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in business or the social sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions and their application to business, economics, optimization and approximation methods; introduction to functions of several variables with emphasis on partial derivatives and extrema. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 154 may not take MATH 157 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Tupper
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP01 TBD

and one of*

ENGL 111W - Literary Classics in English (3)

Examines literary “classics”, variously defined, apprehending them both on their own terms and within larger critical conversations. May incorporate the comparative study of work in related artistic fields and engage relevant media trends. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 101W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Torsten Kehler
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
ENGL 112W - Literature Now (3)

Introduces students to contemporary works of literature in English and/or contemporary approaches to interpreting literature. May focus on one or multiple genres. Includes attention to writing skills. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Mary Ann Gillies
TBD
B101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
ENGL 113W - Literature and Performance (3)

Introduces students to plays and performance works created and adapted for the stage, and/or the performative dimensions of other literary forms. May be organized historically, generically or thematically. The course may also explore the links between literary and performance theory. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 103W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

ENGL 114W - Language and Purpose (3)

Introduces students to the relationships between writing and purpose, between the features of texts and their meaning and effects. May focus on one or more literary or non-literary genres, including (but not limited to) essays, oratory, autobiography, poetry, and journalism. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 104W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

ENGL 115W - Literature and Culture (3)

An Introduction to the study of literature within the wider cultural field, with a focus on contemporary issues across genres and media. Students with credit for ENGL 105W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

ENGL 199W - Writing to Persuade (3)

An introduction to reading and writing from a rhetorical perspective. The course treats reading and writing as activities that take place in particular circumstances and situations, in contrast to the traditional emphasis on decontextualized, formal features of texts. It prepares students for reading and writing challenges they are likely to encounter within and beyond the classroom. Prerequisite: 12 units. Students with credit for ENGL 199 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 or PHIL 300 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Martin Hahn
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking (3)

An introduction to the tools of reasoning used in everyday life and in science. The overall aim of the course is to understand what makes good reasoning good, what makes bad reasoning bad, and how to do more of the former and less of the latter. Topics include: construction, analysis, and evaluation of arguments; logic and probability; updating beliefs and making decisions; designing experiments; interpreting statistics; identifying fallacies and biases. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL XX1 may not take this course for further credit. Q/Breadth-Social Sci/Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lyle Crawford
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

An introduction to the theory of deductive reasoning. We consider deductive arguments in philosophy, in everyday life, and in mathematical proofs, and discuss what distinguishes valid inferences from fallacies. The course will cover propositional logic and first-order logic. Open to all students. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 120W - Moral and Legal Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of moral and legal issues we confront in our dealings with the state and our fellow human beings, such as: Is it wrong to break the law? Should pornography and recreational drugs be illegal? Do animals have rights? Is there a duty to admit immigrants? Are there duties to the world's poor? Are indigenous peoples owed reparations? Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michaela Lucas
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 150 - Great Works in the History of Philosophy (3)

A survey of some classic texts in the history of philosophy. See the course outline for more detail on the specific figures and themes covered. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 151 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

WL 101W - Writing in World Literature (3)

Explores literary texts from diverse linguistic and cultural origins while introducing students to the fundamentals of comparative literary analysis and critical writing. May examine cross-cultural interactions, or compare texts thematically. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

WL 103W - Early World Literatures (3)

Introduces ways of comparing early world literatures across time and space. May explore fundamental themes such as love, heroism, or the underworld. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

WL 104W - Modern World Literatures (3)

Introduces ways of comparing modern world literatures across time and space. May explore topics such as revolution, technology, or existentialism. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rastin Mehri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 Rastin Mehri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 Rastin Mehri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
WL 105W - World Literature Lab (3)

Incorporates academic and creative writing assignments through hands-on exploration of language, literacy, and literature across cultures. Includes translation exercises and writing workshops. Additional language fluency highly recommended but not required. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

* any one of these courses may be replaced by any three unspecified transfer units in English or in ENGL-Writing at the 100-or 200-level.

^^ to be completed at Simon Fraser University.

Upper Division Requirements

In the last 60 units, students must complete a minimum of 36 upper division units in business courses, which must include the following:

  • all core courses (see Core Courses below)
  • an area of concentration (see Areas of Concentration below)
  • at least three 400 division BUS courses (excluding practicum courses and BUS 478). Any 400 division BUS course completed at SFU must be worth a minimum of three units to be used to fulfil this requirement. 400 division BUS courses worth zero units cannot be used to fulfil this requirement. These courses may be used toward the requirements for the area(s) of concentration. At least one of these 400 division BUS courses must be completed at Simon Fraser University.

Core Courses

Students must complete all core courses with a minimum C- grade.

Students complete all of

BUS 300 - Professional Development - Planning (1) ^^

Students will develop an academic plan by expanding their understanding of the relationship between business courses and the themes of social responsibility, innovation and global perspective. Students must obtain a P grade to successfully complete this course. Prerequisite: This course is only open to approved business administration majors admitted to the faculty in Fall 2022 and onward, BUS 100 with a P grade and BUS 217W with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Recommendation to take with BUS 360W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Bahareh Assadi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 303 - Business, Society and Ethics (3)

Examines the context of business in society and the paradigms, frameworks, and theories that shape how we think about business ethics and make ethical decisions. Incorporates recent cross-disciplinary research in the development of reflective practice, moral literacy, and decision-making under conditions of uncertainty, ambiguity, complexity, and diverse competing interests. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Daniel Hooley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Sara Graves
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Shafik Bhalloo
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Daniel Hooley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 312 - Introduction to Finance (3)

Role and function of financial managers, financial analysis, compound interest valuation and capital budgeting, management of current assets, introduction to financial instruments and institutions. Prerequisite: BUS 254 (or 324) with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Recommended: BUS 207, ECON 201, or ECON 301. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tara Immell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Tara Immell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 343 - Introduction to Marketing (3)

The environment of marketing; relation of social sciences to marketing; evaluation of marketing theory and research; assessment of demand, consumer behaviour analysis; market institutions; method and mechanics of distribution in domestic, foreign and overseas markets; sales organization; advertising; new product development, publicity and promotion; marketing programs. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Claudia Gomez Borquez
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Claudia Gomez Borquez
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
D205 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 360W - Business Communication (4) ^

Helps students develop professional writing- and speaking-based communication strategies they can confidently adapt to a wide range of business situations. The course aims to raise their communication performance to a professionally acceptable level, rather than to memorize or theorize about communication knowledge: this is a “learn-by-doing” course. Students will improve their ability to conceptualize, analyze/evaluate, synthesize, and apply information to guide their thinking and finished products across various business contexts. As teamwork is a fundamental skill valued by employers, students will participate in a major team project to learn about and apply best practices for collaboration with respect to professional business communication. The primary means of instruction and learning is guided practice in both writing and presenting in response to realistic business contexts. Instruction and assessment focus on both the process of creating professional, finished products, as well as the quality of those products. Prerequisite: This course is open to students admitted prior to Fall 2014 to the business administration major, honours, or second degree program and who have 45 units, OR to students admitted Fall 2014 - Summer 2017 to the business administration major, honours, or second degree program and who have 45 units and BUS 130 or (BUS 201 or BUS 202) or BUS 301, with a minimum grade of C-, OR to students admitted Fall 2017 – Summer 2022 to the business administration major, honours, or second degree program and who have 45 units and BUS 130 or (BUS 201 or BUS 202) or BUS 301, and BUS 217W, both with a minimum grade of C-, OR to students admitted Fall 2022 onwards to the business administration major, honours, or second degree program, and who have 45 units; BUS 217W and (BUS 201 or BUS 202), both with a minimum grade of C-; and Corequisite: BUS 300, OR to business administration joint major or joint honours students with BUS 217W with a minimum grade of C- and 45 units, OR to business and economics joint major students with ECON 220W with a minimum grade of C- and 45 units, OR to mechatronic systems engineering and business administration double degree students with 45 units, OR to management systems science or actuarial science majors with 45 units OR to data science major with BUS 217W with a minimum grade of C- and 45 units. Students who have taken BUS 360 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Leanne Barlow
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Leanne Barlow
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D300 Darren Francis
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
E100 Kevin Stewart
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E200 Leanne Barlow
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E300 Kevin Stewart
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 373 - Operations and Supply Chain Management (3)

Operations and Supply Chain Management (OSCM) examines business processes and improves them for long-term sustainability. Large-scale globalization and shortened product life cycles make successful OSCM even more critical for the survival of any company. In this course, we will examine the role of OSCM for organizations through qualitative and quantitative managerial tools. Prerequisite: BUS 232 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Seyed Salar Ghotb
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 393 - Commercial Law (3)

Common law, equity, and statute law; contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments; partnership and corporation law; international commercial law. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shafik Bhalloo
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Jordan Jutras
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
E100 Robin Elliott
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 7:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 478 - Strategy (3) ^^

Students will demonstrate strategic decision making and critical thinking skills by integrating knowledge and skills acquired in prior course work within the various functional areas of business. Students will conduct rigorous and comprehensive strategic analyses of firms and industries which relate to the strategic fit between internal and external organizational environments, competitive dynamics over an industry’s life cycle, and value creation and competitive advantage through the development of effective corporate and business-level strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 207 (or ECON 201 or ECON 301), BUS 312, 343, 360W and either BUS 374 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 90 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Edward Bukszar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Yuri Taira
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Edward Bukszar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D400 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D500 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 6:00–8:50 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 496 - Professional Development - Summit (1) ^^

Final professional development course within the bachelor of business administration enables students to think about what they have learned and experienced as part of their academic and learning journey. This course helps students to identify and explain their transformation as a learner and how that applies to their career journey and development. Students must obtain a P grade to successfully complete this course. Prerequisite: This course is only open to approved business administration majors admitted to the faculty in Fall 2022 and onward, BUS 300 with a P grade and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 95 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Kelly Cardwell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

BUS 374 - Organization Theory (3)

Organizations, not individuals, are this course's basic unit of analysis. We will seek to answer questions about organizations, such as why they exist, what objectives they pursue, how they function, how they survive and grow, who they interact with, how they interact with each other, how they are evaluated, and how they respond to failure. In answering these questions, the course will introduce students to major theoretical perspectives and issues studied in organizational theory. Prerequisite: 45 units; BUS 272 with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rajiv Kozhikode
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 381 - Introduction to Human Resource Management (3)

Subjects include human resource planning, job analysis and design, recruitment, employment equity, selection and placement, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, training and development, occupational health and safety, and industrial relations. For each subject an overview of current Canadian issues and practices is presented. Prerequisite: BUS 272 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Melissa McCrae
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Bahareh Assadi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

BUS 346 - Global Business Environment (3)

Study of international environment and its impact on business behaviour: cultural, social, economic and institutional factors; major functions of international business; export and import trade, foreign investment, production and marketing operations; theoretical principles, government policies, business practices. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rekha Krishnan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Aneesh Sharma
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 410 - Financial Institutions (3)

An examination of financial institutions and the markets in which they operate. Topics may include: institutional structure, financial contract forms, valuation and pricing relationships, financial intermediation, financial transacting, the regulatory environment, risk measurement and hedging strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alexander Vedrashko
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Alexander Vedrashko
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 411 - Fixed Income Security Analysis and Valuation (3)

As an introduction to the market valuation of fixed income securities, this course covers: history of fixed income securities; valuation methods for fixed income securities, including fixed and variable annuities, government and corporate bonds, defined benefit pension plans, bonds with contingencies, fixed income derivative securities; and, fixed income risk management using duration and convexity measures. Prerequisite: BUS 315 and BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 417 - Equity Security Analysis (3)

Covers the historical, theoretical and practical issues involved in the market valuation of equity securities. Three general areas are studied: history of equity securities; theory of equity security valuation; and topics in portfolio management. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 492 under the topic Security Analysis may not take BUS 417 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Geoffrey Poitras
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 418 - International Financial Management (3)

An introduction to international financial markets and institutions and to the management of assets and liabilities in an international/multinational setting. Topics to be covered include: exchange rate determination and management of foreign exchange risk; interest rate swaps; international portfolio management; comparative markets; and country risk. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rui Wan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Valerie Liao
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 430 - Cross-Cultural Management (3)

Examines the major similarities and differences in management systems and practices in a variety of countries, including western Europe, East Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. Topics include the following: comparative management frameworks, managing cultural differences, cross-cultural business negotiations, and international human resource management. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rajiv Kozhikode
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 431 - Business with East Asian Countries (3)

This course examines the opportunities and challenges of doing business with the Pacific Rim countries such as China, Japan and Korea. Topics include the following: the political and economic systems as they affect foreign investment; social and cultural systems as they affect management practices; the conduct of business negotiations for market entry; and marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

BUS 432 - International Human Resource Management (3)

Significance of multinational complexity and diversity (cultural, economic, demographic, etc.) to the human resource function. Interplay among human resource functions (employee procurement, allocation, utilization), types of employees, and countries of operation. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and one of BUS 272 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

BUS 434 - Foreign Market Entry (3)

Examines various topics related to a firm's entry into international markets and the means of sustaining a formidable presence vis-a-vis competitors in foreign markets. Begins with an overview of the historical evolution of the globalization process, the internationalization process of individual firms, challenges that internationalizing firms face in terms of differences in culture and political risk among various host markets entered, and models of multinational companies, and then builds on this background in providing an overview and in-depth coverage of important entry modes such as licensing/franchising, JVs/alliances, acquisitions/mergers with specific focus on managing these modes of entry in an international setting. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346. Students who have taken BUS 492 (Topic: Foreign Market Entry) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rekha Krishnan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
BUS 435 - Management of International Firms (3)

Strategic requirements for the management of multinational corporations. Firm-specific and institutional challenges facing global managers in formulating and implementing profitable strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

BUS 447 - Global Marketing Management (3)

The marketing of goods and services in an international context, with emphasis on Pacific Rim countries. Theoretical concepts, environmental influences. Researching and forecasting international markets. The management of international marketing. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Emily Treen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby

^ to be completed before the student's 75th unit and at Simon Fraser University in accordance with the WQB requirements.

^^ to be completed at Simon Fraser University.

Area of Concentration

Students choose one or more of the following areas of concentration and complete all the requirements as specified below.

Accounting

Students must complete all* of

BUS 320 - Financial Accounting: Assets (3)

In-depth coverage of the accounting methods, problems and limitations associated with assets. Alternative valuation bases will be emphasized and illustrated together with the impact on income. Integration of theory and practice in relation to the treatment of assets. Prerequisite: BUS 251 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Dennis Chung
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Dennis Chung
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 4:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 321 - Financial Accounting: Equities (3)

In-depth coverage of accounting, methods, problems, and limitations, associated with liabilities and owners' equity. Prerequisite: BUS 320 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Robin Sandhawalia
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 322 - Intermediate Managerial Accounting (3)

In-depth examination of important managerial accounting topics introduced in BUS 254 (e.g., transfer pricing, variance analysis) and more advanced topics (e.g., decision making under uncertainty, the value of information), focusing on providing the tools and techniques needed for the generation, analysis and dissemination of management accounting information necessary for making strategic business decisions. The course will also introduce and develop the case approach in order to prepare students for BUS 424. Prerequisite: BUS 254 with a minimum grade of C-, 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Weiming Liu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 421 - Accounting Theory (3)

Consideration of methods by which accounting theory is developed with an emphasis on the relationship between accounting information, capital market behaviour and management actions. Prerequisite: BUS 321 and BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lei Zhang
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Lei Zhang
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and at least one* of

BUS 420 - Advanced Accounting (3)

In-depth coverage of advanced accounting topics, specifically issues relating to business combinations and foreign currency. An introduction to the unique aspects and issues of accounting for not-for-profit organizations will be provided. Consideration is also given to the interpretation and analysis of financial statements. Prerequisite: BUS 321, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Robin Sandhawalia
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 424 - Advanced Managerial Accounting (3)

Students will familiarize themselves with the ways in which financial information is used by managers within the organization — for strategic planning, for strategic profitability analyses, for setting transfer prices, for performance measurement and evaluation, for product development decisions, etc. The emphasis is on the use (rather than the preparation) of managerial accounting information. Prerequisite: BUS 322 and BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Akash Rattan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 426 - Auditing and Assurance: Concepts and Methods (3)

A study of the conceptual foundations and the nature and purpose of the external audit function. The course will also discuss some of the more recent developments in auditing such as comprehensive auditing, computer auditing, and the use of statistical methodology in auditing. Prerequisite: BUS 321, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michael Favere-Marchesi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Michael Favere-Marchesi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 428 - Forensic Accounting and Data Analytics (3)

This course combines forensic accounting with data analytics. Students explore common fraud schemes, and learn how to identify and investigate them. Students then apply data analytic methods to explore fraud in an accounting case, and communicate their findings to practicing forensic accountants who provide real-world guidance and feedback. Prerequisite: BUS 321, BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

* Must be completed at SFU.

** When offered as a selected topics course in accounting.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

For this concentration, students complete all of

BUS 314 - Resourcing New Ventures (3)

Start-up and early-stage ventures have particular financial challenges associated with the uncertain and unproven nature of the project. This course analyzes how entrepreneurs and their financial backers can spot, create and manage value. Topics covered include opportunity recognition, cash flow forecasting, valuation methodologies, financial contracts, and careful negotiations. Various sources are considered for start-up capital (private debt, angel financiers, venture capitalists, development banks), and different strategies are considered for harvesting or exiting (initial public offerings, merger, acquisition, leveraged buy-out, shut down) a venture. Prerequisite: BUS 238 or BUS 240 or BUS 254, with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

BUS 338 - Foundations of Innovation (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of the management of technological innovation. The external environment for technological innovation is examined through investigation of national and regional systems of innovation. The internal firm capabilities for creating and sustaining innovative firms are explored in detail, from the creation of ideas through to the commercialization of new products and services. Proficiency is gained in identifying sources of innovative value, implementing processes to capture it, and creating strategies for commercialization. Prerequisite: BUS 238 or BUS 240 or BUS 254, with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

BUS 361 - Project Management (3)

Introduction to the hard and soft skills of project management. Management software and techniques such as work breakdown, estimation, budgeting and status reporting are used. Applies structured processes and develops team-based skills and knowledge. Assumes no prior computing or technical knowledge. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Eamonn O'Laocha
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Min Jin Kim
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 477 - Startup Experience (4)

This experiential course will expose students to the planning and development process of creating a startup. Emphasis is placed on integrating and applying all of the foundational skills acquired in previous entrepreneurship and innovation classes in a real world setting. Prerequisite: BUS 338, BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course), both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 314, BUS 361.

and one of

BUS 339 - Make Change Studio II - Iteration and Prototyping (4)

Students work in small teams to rapidly and repeatedly conceive a new business, produce its first prototype product or service and test that product or service with potential business customers. Through several such iterations, students learn practical business planning, the importance of people, context and technology and effective teamwork skills. Prerequisite: BUS 238, IAT 330, both with a minimum grade of C-, 45 units; or permission from the instructor.

BUS 394 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interest of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering; 45 units.

BUS 395 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interest of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering; 45 units.

BUS 406 - Startup Accelerator (3)

Entrepreneurial ideas undergo a transition from being a concept within a classroom to being able to survive as a commercially viable enterprise. Intensive coaching and mentoring through sector-specific mentors and organizations will provide students with experience in market validation, pitching and business planning as ventures move to incubators, accelerators, or sustainable operations. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; 60 units; BUS 360W (or successful completion of an upper division Writing (W) course) with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for a Selected Topics in Business Administration, when offered as New Venture Accelerator, may not complete this course for further credit.

BUS 443 - New Product Development and Design (3)

Understand how to develop and launch new products that will be successful with customers. Students will learn to: identify product/service opportunities; generate and evaluate concepts; develop concepts into products; launch new products. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course), 343, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 450 - Managing Emerging Opportunities (3)

Develops abilities to identify and evaluate emerging opportunities in the specific context of consulting. Through innovation consulting projects with real clients, participants will develop their problem-solving and interpersonal skills, and practice delivering analysis and recommendations to satisfy client needs. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course) with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 453 - Sustainable Innovation (3)

Challenges associated with continuing innovation are examined and students work to generate innovative solutions by challenging existing economic models. Students learn about sustainable opportunity, recognition, and screening, and understand how great ideas to 'save the planet' can get off the ground. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course) with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 338. Students with credit for BUS 494 when offered as Sustainable Innovation may not complete this course for further credit.

BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

** When offered as a selected topics course in innovation and entrepreneurship.

Finance

For this concentration, students complete all of

BUS 315 - Investments (3)

Investments from an individual and institutional point of view. Topics include: bond valuation and the term structure of interest rates, stock valuation, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, efficient markets and portfolio performance evaluation. Prerequisite: BUS 312, BUS 336 and BUS 207 or ECON 201 or ECON 301, all with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Greta Fesechko
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Greta Fesechko
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 316 - Derivative Securities (3)

The role derivative securities, mainly options and futures contracts, in controlling risk and enhancing profit opportunities. Valuation of derivative securities. The organization of options and futures markets and the mechanics of trading. Prerequisite: BUS 312, 336, both with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Husna Memon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Husna Memon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 413 - Corporate Finance (3)

Corporate decisions in the context of financial markets. Topics include: real asset investments, financing alternatives, dividend policy, working capital management, and corporate securities valuation. Prerequisite: BUS 312, BUS 315, and BUS 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jijun Niu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Jijun Niu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and two of

BUS 410 - Financial Institutions (3)

An examination of financial institutions and the markets in which they operate. Topics may include: institutional structure, financial contract forms, valuation and pricing relationships, financial intermediation, financial transacting, the regulatory environment, risk measurement and hedging strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alexander Vedrashko
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Alexander Vedrashko
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 411 - Fixed Income Security Analysis and Valuation (3)

As an introduction to the market valuation of fixed income securities, this course covers: history of fixed income securities; valuation methods for fixed income securities, including fixed and variable annuities, government and corporate bonds, defined benefit pension plans, bonds with contingencies, fixed income derivative securities; and, fixed income risk management using duration and convexity measures. Prerequisite: BUS 315 and BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 414 - Real Estate Investments (3)

This course provides a broad overview of the real estate field. We will investigate all aspects of real estate investment decisions, including property valuation and management, financing choices, and market cycles. The main goal of the course is to offer you a foundation for a career in the real estate industry. Prerequisite: BUS 315, BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students with credit for BUS 490, 491, 492, 493, 494, or 495 when offered as Real Estate Finance may not take this course for further credit.

BUS 417 - Equity Security Analysis (3)

Covers the historical, theoretical and practical issues involved in the market valuation of equity securities. Three general areas are studied: history of equity securities; theory of equity security valuation; and topics in portfolio management. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 492 under the topic Security Analysis may not take BUS 417 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Geoffrey Poitras
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 418 - International Financial Management (3)

An introduction to international financial markets and institutions and to the management of assets and liabilities in an international/multinational setting. Topics to be covered include: exchange rate determination and management of foreign exchange risk; interest rate swaps; international portfolio management; comparative markets; and country risk. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rui Wan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Valerie Liao
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 419 - Advanced Derivative Securities (3)

This is a second course in derivative securities. Topics may include: extensions of the Black-Scholes model, pricing of American options, interest rate derivatives, complex derivatives and real options. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 493 under the topic Advanced Derivative Securities may not take BUS 419 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Geoffrey Poitras
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

** When offered as a selected topics course in finance.

Human Resource Management

For this concentration, students complete both of

BUS 374 - Organization Theory (3)

Organizations, not individuals, are this course's basic unit of analysis. We will seek to answer questions about organizations, such as why they exist, what objectives they pursue, how they function, how they survive and grow, who they interact with, how they interact with each other, how they are evaluated, and how they respond to failure. In answering these questions, the course will introduce students to major theoretical perspectives and issues studied in organizational theory. Prerequisite: 45 units; BUS 272 with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rajiv Kozhikode
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 381 - Introduction to Human Resource Management (3)

Subjects include human resource planning, job analysis and design, recruitment, employment equity, selection and placement, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, training and development, occupational health and safety, and industrial relations. For each subject an overview of current Canadian issues and practices is presented. Prerequisite: BUS 272 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Melissa McCrae
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Bahareh Assadi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and three of

BUS 481 - Recruitment and Selection (3)

Design and administration of recruiting and selections mechanisms. Analysis of procedures and skills that are used to translate strategic objectives into staffing decisions. How these mechanisms are affected by internal and external factors such as person-organization fit, labor markets, government legislation and technology. Prerequisite: BUS 381 and 360W, with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bahareh Assadi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 482 - Performance Management (3)

The design and implementation of performance management systems. How these systems articulate organizational mission, strategy and goals, provide organizational and individual standards, and integrate systems and procedures within the context of organizational culture and practices. Prerequisite: 60 units; BUS 272, 381 and 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-.

BUS 483 - Introduction to Employment Law For Business (3)

Provides a solid foundation for students in understanding the legal obligations, statutes, and limitations within provincial legislation that govern employment relationships in non-union contexts. Additionally, will explore the legal aspects of matters of particular importance for managers faced with human resource policy decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 393, BUS 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 484 - Employment Systems (3)

Examination of the day-to-day administration of various employment systems in both unionized and non-unionized settings. Employment systems have implications for how conflicts between employee and employer interests are resolved, for the attainment of due process in the workplace, and for the flexibility and efficiency of work organization. Characteristics and outcomes of various employment systems will be examined. Prerequisite: BUS 381 and 360W, with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 485 - Negotiations and Conflict Management (3)

Negotiation is the art and science of securing agreements between two or more parties that are interdependent and who are seeking to maximize their outcomes. The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiation as it is practiced in a variety of settings. The course will allow participants the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytical frameworks. Prerequisite: BUS 272, 360W, and either 374 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students with credit for BUEC 485 may not take BUS 485 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ulrich Paschen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 486 - Leadership (3)

Addresses theoretical foundation and research associated with leadership, including a critical assessment of what leaders do. Issues such as gender and leadership, leadership ethics, and culture and leadership will be examined. Prerequisite: BUS 272, 360W, and either 374 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 490-495 under this topic may not take this course for further credit.

BUS 487 - Organizational Development and Change Management (3)

Theories and methods of planned change in organizations with an emphasis on the psychological, cultural and structural issues of implementing change. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and (BUS 374 or BUS 381), all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 488 - Group Dynamics and Teamwork (3)

Interpersonal and group behaviour in organizational contexts, including group development, team building, interpersonal communications, interpersonal conflict, group problem-solving and decision-making. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and (BUS 374 or BUS 381), all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 489 - Management Practices for Sustainability (3)

Businesses are realigning and in some cases, reinventing their organizations toward more sustainable business models. Management systems and initiatives will be examined that enable organizations to reduce their firms' negative environmental and social impacts while, in many cases, increasing profits and competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and (BUS 381 or BUS 374), all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 457 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kam Phung
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

** When offered as a selected topics course in human resource management.

International Business

For this concentration, students complete

BUS 346 - Global Business Environment (3)

Study of international environment and its impact on business behaviour: cultural, social, economic and institutional factors; major functions of international business; export and import trade, foreign investment, production and marketing operations; theoretical principles, government policies, business practices. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rekha Krishnan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Aneesh Sharma
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and three of

BUS 418 - International Financial Management (3)

An introduction to international financial markets and institutions and to the management of assets and liabilities in an international/multinational setting. Topics to be covered include: exchange rate determination and management of foreign exchange risk; interest rate swaps; international portfolio management; comparative markets; and country risk. Prerequisite: BUS 315, 316, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rui Wan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Valerie Liao
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 430 - Cross-Cultural Management (3)

Examines the major similarities and differences in management systems and practices in a variety of countries, including western Europe, East Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. Topics include the following: comparative management frameworks, managing cultural differences, cross-cultural business negotiations, and international human resource management. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rajiv Kozhikode
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 431 - Business with East Asian Countries (3)

This course examines the opportunities and challenges of doing business with the Pacific Rim countries such as China, Japan and Korea. Topics include the following: the political and economic systems as they affect foreign investment; social and cultural systems as they affect management practices; the conduct of business negotiations for market entry; and marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

BUS 432 - International Human Resource Management (3)

Significance of multinational complexity and diversity (cultural, economic, demographic, etc.) to the human resource function. Interplay among human resource functions (employee procurement, allocation, utilization), types of employees, and countries of operation. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and one of BUS 272 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

BUS 434 - Foreign Market Entry (3)

Examines various topics related to a firm's entry into international markets and the means of sustaining a formidable presence vis-a-vis competitors in foreign markets. Begins with an overview of the historical evolution of the globalization process, the internationalization process of individual firms, challenges that internationalizing firms face in terms of differences in culture and political risk among various host markets entered, and models of multinational companies, and then builds on this background in providing an overview and in-depth coverage of important entry modes such as licensing/franchising, JVs/alliances, acquisitions/mergers with specific focus on managing these modes of entry in an international setting. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346. Students who have taken BUS 492 (Topic: Foreign Market Entry) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rekha Krishnan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
BUS 435 - Management of International Firms (3)

Strategic requirements for the management of multinational corporations. Firm-specific and institutional challenges facing global managers in formulating and implementing profitable strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

BUS 447 - Global Marketing Management (3)

The marketing of goods and services in an international context, with emphasis on Pacific Rim countries. Theoretical concepts, environmental influences. Researching and forecasting international markets. The management of international marketing. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Emily Treen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Other 400 division courses deemed to have significant international business relevance may, with prior faculty permission, be substituted for the above courses. These may be offered in another faculty. A course substitution for international business cannot be used for any other concentration.

Students concentrating in international business are strongly advised to consider combining it with another business concentration.

** When offered as a selected topics course in international business.

Management Information Systems

For this concentration, students complete all of

BUS 361 - Project Management (3)

Introduction to the hard and soft skills of project management. Management software and techniques such as work breakdown, estimation, budgeting and status reporting are used. Applies structured processes and develops team-based skills and knowledge. Assumes no prior computing or technical knowledge. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Eamonn O'Laocha
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Min Jin Kim
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 362 - Business Process Analysis (4)

Prepares students to model, analyze and propose improvements to business processes. In the major project, students analyze a process within an organization and use current techniques and tools to propose changes and a supporting information system. Prerequisite: BUS 237 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units; OR Data Science majors with 45 units. Students with credit for BUS 394 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Reza Shams
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 468 - Managing Information Technology for Business Value (3)

Focuses both on current issues (e.g. build/buy, outsourcing, alignment) and emerging issues (e.g. social networking, utility computing, knowledge management and privacy) in obtaining value from information technology. Prerequisite: BUS 237, BUS 360W, BUS 362, all with a minimum grade of C-; 90 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Moksh Matta
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
E100 Moksh Matta
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and two of

BUS 462 - Business Analytics (3)

Utilizes technology to support analysis and decision making abilities by identifying, analyzing and effectively reporting important business information. Concepts of data warehousing, data mining and visualizing data are introduced. A variety of software applications are used to demonstrate tools and techniques that support analysis and decision making for managers. Prerequisite: BUS 336, BUS 360W, BUS 362, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Corequisite: BUS 336 can be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nisa Dar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 464 - Business Data Management (3)

Focuses on the design and use of integrated database management systems in organizations. Students create data models for capturing and storing data from business operations, organizing it for deriving business intelligence, aggregating and visualizing the information for decision-making. Structured query language is primarily used for all the above data management activities. Prerequisite: BUS 360W, 362, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Amir Amintabar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 465 - Business Systems Development (3)

Focuses on the practical application of business technology management knowledge and skills to develop business systems. Students will learn how to apply knowledge from prior MIS courses and develop applications for Internet-enabled businesses. Students will conceptualize data and functional requirements for business software. The course will thus deepen skills in process logic, data management, and user interface design in business domains. Prerequisite: BUS 360W, BUS 362, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 464, CMPT 354. Students with credit for BUS 492 (Summer 2017) may not take this course for further credit.

BUS 466 - Web-Enabled Business (3)

Explores strategic issues and technologies in contemporary web-based business, from the evolution of business applications on the Internet through to contemporary Open Source and Web 2.0 applications. In depth exploration of new technology and business applications related to these technologies. Prerequisite: BUS 237, BUS 360W, BUS 362, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Raymond Yu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

** When offered as a selected topics course in management information systems.

Operations Management

For this concentration, students complete both of

BUS 336 - Data Analytics and Visualization (3)

Investigate data analytics, visualization, and modeling approaches relevant to business decisions. The course will investigate three important pillars of analytics including decision analytics, predictive analytics, and data visualization. Prerequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; BUS 232, ECON 233, or STAT 270, with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gohram Gohram
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Negar Ganjouhaghighi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP01 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP02 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP03 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP04 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 473 - Advanced Operations Management (3)

The systems approach to management of operations including the design, implementation, control and improvement of processes in order to grow social, environmental, and economic value for stakeholders involved in bringing goods and services to market. Prerequisite: Students admitted prior to Fall 2022 with (BUS 373 or BUS 336) and BUS 360W, or students admitted Fall 2022 onward with BUS 373 and BUS 360W; both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Payman Jula
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and two of

BUS 437 - Decision Analysis in Business (3)

A seminar in the use of Bayesian techniques in business decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 336, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units; OR Data Science majors with BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C- and 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Payman Jula
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 440 - Simulation in Management Decision-making (4)

Development and use of simulation models as an aid in making complex management decisions. Hands on use of business related tools for computer simulation. Issues related to design and validation of simulation models, the assessment of input data, and the interpretation and use of simulation output. Prerequisite: BUS 336, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-, 60 units; OR Data Science majors with BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-, 60 units.

BUS 445 - Customer Analytics (3)

Exposes students to the art of using analytic tools from across the spectrum of data mining and modeling to provide powerful competitive advantage in business. Students will learn to recognize when a method should or should not be used, what data is required, and how to use the software tools. Areas covered include database marketing, geospatial marketing and fundamental strategic and tactical decisions such as segmentation, targeting and allocating resources to the marketing mix. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 336, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-, 60 units; OR Data Science majors with BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-, and 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Miremad Soleymanian
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 474 - Supply Chain Management (3)

Exploration of the entire network of companies that work to design, produce, distribute, service and recycle their goods and services to customers. Efficient flow of information, material and finances along the entire chain allows firms to collaborate in a manner that benefits both corporations and customers. Analysis of the broader supply chain enables improvements in procurement, customer response time, risk sharing, on-time delivery, inventory levels, and transportation and global logistics. Prerequisite: Students admitted prior to Fall 2022 with (BUS 373 or BUS 336) and BUS 360W, or students admitted Fall 2022 onward with BUS 373 and BUS 360W; both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 490-495 under this topic may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ulrich Paschen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 475 - Sustainable Operations (3)

Examines key challenges and opportunities organizations face in integrating sustainable business practices within corporate strategy. Identifies organizational capabilities needed to support existing sustainable commitments and strategies to allow for innovation. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students with credit for BUS 49X Selected Topics (Sustainable Operations) may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Feyza Sahinyazan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

** When offered as a selected topics course in operations management.

Marketing

For this concentration, students complete all of

BUS 343 - Introduction to Marketing (3)

The environment of marketing; relation of social sciences to marketing; evaluation of marketing theory and research; assessment of demand, consumer behaviour analysis; market institutions; method and mechanics of distribution in domestic, foreign and overseas markets; sales organization; advertising; new product development, publicity and promotion; marketing programs. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Claudia Gomez Borquez
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Claudia Gomez Borquez
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
D205 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 345 - Marketing Research (3)

A course in the management of marketing research. The basics of the design, conduct, and analysis of marketing research studies. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 336, both with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units; OR Data Science majors with BUS 343 with a minimum grade of C- and 45 units. Students with credit for BUS 442 may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Emily Treen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
BUS 347 - Consumer Behaviour (3)

A study of the manner in which decisions are made in the market place, by both the ultimate consumer and the industrial buyer. Course will include consideration of consumer decision processes, individual and group influences and special cases such as brand loyalty and consumerism. Prerequisite: BUS 343 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Judy Zaichkowsky
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and three of

BUS 441 - Web Analytics (3)

Adopting an experimental approach and being responsive to customer and competitor reactions is an essential skill set to firms and organizations. Situated in the data-rich environment of digital media and channels like websites or search engines, this course is designed to help students develop "probe and learn" skills, which translate beyond web and digital management, and help them acquire hands-on experience in using analytics tools to manage digital marketing campaigns. Prerequisite: BUS 360W, BUS 343, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 443 - New Product Development and Design (3)

Understand how to develop and launch new products that will be successful with customers. Students will learn to: identify product/service opportunities; generate and evaluate concepts; develop concepts into products; launch new products. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course), 343, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 444 - Business to Business Marketing (3)

This course deals with the marketing of products and services to industrial and other non-consumer sector buyers. The student will be expected to apply previously acquired marketing skills to purchasing situations which arise between organizations. Due to the nature of manufacturing activity in this province, industrial marketing will be approached from a resource industry based standpoint where discussions permit. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students with credit for BUS 344 may not complete BUS 444 for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mitsu Feng
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 445 - Customer Analytics (3)

Exposes students to the art of using analytic tools from across the spectrum of data mining and modeling to provide powerful competitive advantage in business. Students will learn to recognize when a method should or should not be used, what data is required, and how to use the software tools. Areas covered include database marketing, geospatial marketing and fundamental strategic and tactical decisions such as segmentation, targeting and allocating resources to the marketing mix. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 336, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-, 60 units; OR Data Science majors with BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-, and 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Miremad Soleymanian
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 446 - Marketing Strategy in Sports, Entertainment and Other Creative Industries (3)

Focuses on the analysis of market problems and opportunities and the development of appropriate strategies, in creative industries. Industries explored may include arts, sports, or entertainment, but the focus may vary from term to term to reflect developments in the creative industry’s marketing landscape. Topics include: analytical techniques, strategic planning methods and managerial problems of planning. Case analysis and problem solving will be the major orientation of the course. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 347, 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 493 when the subject of the course was Sports and Entertainment Marketing may not take BUS 446 for further credit.

BUS 447 - Global Marketing Management (3)

The marketing of goods and services in an international context, with emphasis on Pacific Rim countries. Theoretical concepts, environmental influences. Researching and forecasting international markets. The management of international marketing. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Recommended: BUS 346.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Emily Treen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 448 - Integrated Marketing Communications (3)

An integrative approach to the study of promotion including advertising publicity, personal selling and sales promotion; evaluation of the role promotion has in marketing and the economy; formulation and analysis of promotional goals, planning, organizing and controlling; utilization of market research studies; forecasting, budgeting, media selection; promotion institutions. Prerequisite: BUS 347, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 449 - Ethical Issues in Marketing (3)

A critical examination of topics such as consumerism, marketing ethics, and social responsibility, efficiency of marketing or ecological marketing. The particular emphasis may vary depending on the interests of the class and instructor. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 360W, both with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 455 - Product & Brand Management (3)

Designed for students seeking a position in product management, topics include defining the role of the product manager; understanding your product as a business; organizational structures, informal networks and how the influential product manager taps into them; product lifecycles (PLC); building visibility and cross-functional teams; competitor analysis; pricing methods and the 4Ps. Prerequisite: BUS 254, BUS 345, BUS 347, and BUS 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 90 units. If students took Product & Brand Management as a selected topics (BUS 491, 492, 493, 494, 495, 496) they may not receive further credit for this course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Judy Zaichkowsky
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 459 - Services Marketing (3)

Increases students' sensitivity to the marketing concepts previously studied as applied to service industries, and familiarizes students with the management problems of service marketing managers. Prerequisite: BUS 343, 347 and 360W, all with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 490-495 under the same topic may not take this course for further credit.

BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

** When offered as a selected topics course in marketing.

Strategic Analysis

For this concentration, students complete

BUS 478 - Strategy (3)

Students will demonstrate strategic decision making and critical thinking skills by integrating knowledge and skills acquired in prior course work within the various functional areas of business. Students will conduct rigorous and comprehensive strategic analyses of firms and industries which relate to the strategic fit between internal and external organizational environments, competitive dynamics over an industry’s life cycle, and value creation and competitive advantage through the development of effective corporate and business-level strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 207 (or ECON 201 or ECON 301), BUS 312, 343, 360W and either BUS 374 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 90 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Edward Bukszar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Yuri Taira
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Edward Bukszar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D400 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D500 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 6:00–8:50 p.m.
Burnaby

and three of

BUS 307 - Business Applications of Game Theory (3)

Game theory is the systematic study of the strategic interactions between economic entities. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of game theory in strategic decision making in a business setting. Games with increasing complexity will be analyzed, with the emphasis on developing a student's ability to think analytically and recognize strategic interactions in strategic management scenarios. Prerequisite: 45 units; BUS 207 or ECON 201, with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for BUS 470 may not take this course for further credit.

BUS 371 - Critical Thinking Through Business Case Analysis (3)

Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. This course builds on the critical thinking process introduced in BUS 217W and explores its use in solving business problems. Prerequisite: 45 units; BUS 217W with a minimum grade of C-.

BUS 471 - Strategic Decision Making (3)

In today’s highly dynamic, complex and information-rich business environment, strategic decision-making skills are crucial. Students will learn about the biases and heuristics that are most relevant for strategic decision-making. Students will receive training to raise awareness for and overcome common biases and generate efficiencies in decision-making through leveraging value from heuristics. Students will also experience and learn about strategic decision-making in teams to become inclusive leaders and successful strategists. Prerequisite: 60 units; BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-.

BUS 479 - Strategy Analysis Practicum (3)

A project study that enables students to work on contemporary business problems, requiring them to apply their foundation knowledge in business and advanced analytical skills. Feasible projects will be identified by the course instructor, in collaboration with the career management office at Beedie. Prerequisite: BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 90 units. Corequisite: BUS 478.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Yuri Taira
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
BUS 490 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (1) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 491 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (2) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: Will vary according to topic. BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 492 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 493 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 494 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (3) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

BUS 495 - Selected Topics in Business Administration (4) **

The subject matter will vary from term to term depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As stated by the faculty at the time of offering and BUS 360W with a minimum grade of C-; 60 units.

Students concentrating in strategic analysis are strongly advised to consider combining it with another business concentration.

** When offered as a selected topics course in strategic analysis.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student's major subject; two courses (minimum three units each)

Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division; two courses (total six units or more)
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth

Must be outside the student's major subject, and may be lower or upper division:

Two courses (total six units or more) Social Sciences: B-Soc
Two courses (total six units or more) Humanities: B-Hum
Two courses (total six units or more) Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth

Two courses (total six units or more) outside the student's major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements).

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

Beedie School of Business Non-Business Elective Requirements

Students admitted to the BBA program for the Fall 2023 term onwards are required to complete a minimum of nine units, outside of the Beedie School of Business, that is centered around the School’s Calling and offers an Indigenous perspective.

Students must complete a minimum of six units from Group A and a minimum of three units from Group B.

Group A

Students must complete a minimum of six units from the following list of courses:

Global Perspective

GA 101 - Introduction to Global Asia (3)

Introduces students to the interconnected, border-crossing worlds of Asian and Asian diasporic people through discussion of scholarship, films, short stories, essays, oral histories, and visual art. Surveys key topics in the study of globalizing processes, such as migration, trade, imperialism, decolonization, globalization, and environmental change. Students with credit for ASC 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Leanne Roderick
Online
HIST 231 - History of Africa to the 19th Century: From Ancient Times to the Slave Trade (3)

A general, introductory survey of Africa's rich pre-colonial past, its vibrant cultures and sophisticated technologies, far-reaching commercial and political networks, and dynamic (and internally differentiated) social systems. Also discusses the trans-Atlantic trade in African slaves and the arrival of Europeans on African shores. Breadth-Humanities.

HUM 101W - Introduction to Global Humanities (3)

An introduction to issues and concepts central to the study of the humanities around the world. Through exposure to primary materials drawn from different periods, disciplines, and regions, students will become acquainted with a range of topics and ideas relating to the study of human values and human experience. Students with credit for HUM 101 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D900 Niall Mackenzie
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D901 Niall Mackenzie
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D902 Niall Mackenzie
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
IS 101 - Global Challenges of the 21st Century: An Introduction to International Studies (3)

Introduces the interdisciplinary field of International Studies to all undergraduates and IS majors. Examines the major global challenges of our time, including poverty and inequality, environmental degradation, nationalism, civil war, and armed conflict. Explores the challenge of global governance and global citizenship. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Anushay Malik
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
IS 200 - Security and Global Governance: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (3)

Examines contemporary security and governance challenges by drawing on insights from across the social sciences. Includes such topics as: war, nuclear proliferation, genocide, human trafficking, and global health threats. Explores the role of international organizations (the UN, EU, NATO and others) in addressing security challenges and advancing global governance. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Logan Masilamani
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
IS 210 - Comparative World Politics: Trajectories, Regimes, Challenges (3)

Introduces students to the variety of systems of governance in the world today, examines the historical and cultural sources of their different developmental trajectories, and assesses the challenges they face in the future. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

IS 220 - Wealth and Poverty of Nations (3)

Analyzes some of the historical reasons for the great divergence in world economic development, and undertakes a cross-country, cross-regional perspective of world economic development using a historical approach to long-run economic growth. Breadth-Social Sciences.

IS 315 - Introduction to Middle East Politics (4)

Introduces the political, economic, and ideological dynamics of contemporary Middle Eastern states. Examines the legacy of colonialism, state formation, central ideological trends such as Arab nationalism and political Islam, the dynamics of state-society contention, and the challenges of economic development. Prerequisite: 45 units.

IS 427 - Globalization, Poverty and Inequality (4)

Analyzes the origins and the economic consequences of globalization and the uneven process of economic development around the world in relation to poverty, by considering the measurement of poverty, its causes and dynamics, as well as public policy for poverty reduction. Prerequisite: 45 units.

LBST 312 - Migration, Migrants, and Work: A Global Perspective (3)

Global labour migration has increased substantially in the last several decades. What factors contribute to the current wave of labour migration? Which countries send and receive migrants, and what is the role of internal migration? What challenges do migrant workers face in their host countries? This course will examine these questions to uncover the nature, trends and impacts of this growing phenomenon. Prerequisite: Strongly Recommended: LBST 101. Students who have taken LBST 330 Global Labour Migration may not take this course for further credit.

POL 141 - International Relations (3)

Explores causes and consequences of international political conflict, including war, terrorism, protectionism, nationalism, economic disparity, migration, and humanitarian crises. Evaluates how states and non-state actors navigate and influence these conflicts and the role of international law, diplomacy, and organizational cooperation. Analyzes worldviews on war, peace, human rights, and world order. Students who have taken POL 241 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 302W - Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (SA) (4)

An introduction to the political economy and culture of capitalism in relation to global problems. Case studies may focus on issues of population, famine, disease, poverty, environmental destruction, social inequality, and nation-state violence. Resistance, rebellion and social movements in response to these problems also will be addressed. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Innovation

CA 381 - Thriving as a Cultural Entrepreneur (3)

Focus on skills and knowledge required to thrive as a creator/entrepreneur in contemporary society. Exploration of the life cycle of various creative enterprises and the development of a personal plan to realize the student's goals. Additional topics to include an introduction to strategic and financial planning, brand development, contracts and business culture. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for FPA 381 may not take this course for further credit.

CMNS 110 - Introduction to Communication Studies (3)

An introduction to selected theories about human communication. This course is required for a major, honours or minor in communication. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Layla Cameron
Online
HIST 135 - Capitalism and the Making of the Modern World (3)

An introductory survey of the dynamic history of capitalism. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

IAT 110 - Visual Communication Design (3)

Visual communication for art and design in digital media. Students learn the fundamentals of digital raster and vector image creation. Design principles such as form, typography and colour theory as they apply to digital media will be taught. Students will have core projects in digital photography, magazine layout and kinetic typography. Primarily for non-SIAT majors; while SIAT majors may take the course, it does not count for credit for SIAT degree requirements. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kenneth Zupan
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
IAT 210 - Introduction to Game Studies: Theory and Design (3)

Reviews the history of games, tracing the evolution of game design from board and card games through the latest electronic products. Examines the medium of games through various lenses: games as rules (game design), games as play (game experience), and games as culture (culture within games, and role of games and game cultures). Prerequisite: Completion of 21 units. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Michael Filimowicz
Online
POL 150 - Science, Policy, and Innovation (3)

Explores how science and technology intersect with public policy. From debates about climate change to the proper boundaries of security and privacy in the Information Age, the politicization of science is an inescapable reality that has far-reaching consequences for scientific advances innovation, and human quality of life. Breadth-Hum/Social Sci/Science.

POL 253 - Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Explores the political dimensions of public policy making in Canada. Reviews theories and techniques in policy analysis, and focuses on the contemporary dynamics of public policy in various economic and social sectors from the point of view of political ideas, interests, institutions, and decision-making. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Cara Camcastle
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PSYC 106 - Psychological Issues in Contemporary Society (3)

Relates contemporary knowledge from psychology to current social problems. Provides relevant information from studies pertaining to problems such as attitude development, prejudice, race relations, addiction, behaviour technology, and family pathology. Course can be repeated for credit. See psychology department website for course description. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

Explores how sociologists study, describe, and explain social life. Introduces the sociological perspective and applies it to fundamental social process and everyday issues. As we consider phenomena ranging from interactions among individuals to societal and global inequalities, students critically examine social issues to build their understanding of the world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Baran (Abu) Fakhri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
SEE 110 - Energy, Environment and Society (3)

Energy availability and sources, environmental consequences of energy supply and consumption, and societal impacts. Explores the environmental, economic, social, and political implications of the choices a society makes to meet its energy needs. Definitions of sustainability. Special emphasis on communication skills.

TEKX 101 - Introduction to 3D Printing and Laser Scanning Technologies (3)

Provides the background and skill set to use 3D printer and laser scanning technologies, and will be done in cooperation with the Maker Space initiative at the SFU Library. Students will learn the basic concepts of 3D printing, computer design tools, and the use of 3D scanners to make replicas of existing objects. Students will complete several 3D printed projects within the course. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Juan Ferrer
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 Juan Ferrer
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby

Social Responsibility

GSWS 100 - Sex Talk: Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Sexuality Studies (3)

An introduction to issues in the study of sex, sexual identity, and sexual culture. Focused on contemporary theories of sexuality as well as representations in fiction, film and popular media from diverse cultural contexts. Students who have completed GDST 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

LBST 100 - Equality and Inequality at Work (3)

Introduces concepts of equality, inequality, diversity, and inclusion as we experience them at work. Includes discussion of what counts as work, who does paid and unpaid work, and how workers challenge inequality and discrimination. Examines how contemporary experiences in Canada of inequality at work are shaped by ongoing colonialism, racialization, gendering, class and other forms of social difference. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Xinying Hu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LBST 101 - Work and Worker's Rights: Introducing Labour Studies (3)

Introduces key concepts and approaches for understanding the character and organization of work, employment relations, worker’s rights, and labour movements in contemporary society. Explores who does paid and unpaid work and under what conditions through the study of trends and issues, including migration and immigration, unionization, precarious employment, and automation. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John-Henry Harter
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 121 - Global Justice (3)

An introduction to the ethical issues arising from interactions of states, NGOs and other international agents. Topics may include international human rights, terrorism, war, gender justice, climate justice, fairness in international trade, cultural diversity and conflict, the rights of indigenous peoples, collective responsibility and restitution for historical wrongdoing, among others. Students who have received credit for PHIL 220 cannot receive credit for this course. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

REM 100 - Global Change (3)

The Earth is experiencing the most dramatic environmental changes it has for thousands of years. How did we end up here? Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the forces behind our ever-increasing environmental footprint. Highlights how ideologies and societal structures have shaped how we interact with the environment and explores the necessary changes for a more sustainable future. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Sessional Instructor
Alexander Cancelli
Online
REM 350 - Energy Management for a Sustainable Climate and Society (4)

An interdisciplinary approach to transforming energy systems in pursuit of sustainable climate and society. Perspectives include thermodynamics, resource potentials, technological potentials, economic evaluation, implementation of transformative public policies, political-economy assessment of policy constraints, national and sub-national governance options, behavioural change potentials, global diplomacy, and pursuit of greater equity within and between countries. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Will Niver
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
SA 200W - Power, Conflict and Change in Canadian Society (SA) (4)

Examines Canadian society from the perspective of the social sciences. Students apply sociological and anthropological concepts to analyze issues in modern societies, focusing on Canada as a case. Topics include class structure, the nature of Canada's population, regional variation, gender relations, multiculturalism, and colonialism. Students with credit for SA 100W are not eligible to take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

SD 281 - Introduction to Sustainability (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and alternative perspectives around sustainability (e.g. Indigenous, just sustainabilities etc.). Students will also learn from the practical experience of diverse experts and sustainability professionals. Conventional approaches to sustainable development will be critiqued to ensure considerations for equity and social justice. Highlights will be showcased from the Global North and Global South. Students with credit for REM 281 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tammara Soma
Online

Multiple Themes (Global Perspective, Innovation, Social Responsibility

ARCH 101 - Reconstructing the Human Past (3)

A survey of methods used by archaeologists to discover and interpret the past. Examples will be drawn from selected sites and cultures around the world. Students who have taken ARCH 201 may not enroll in ARCH 101. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 David Maxwell
Online
BPK 140 - Contemporary Health Issues (3)

Explores health from a holistic perspective, in which health is viewed as physical, psychological, and social well-being. Considers genetics, environment, personal health behaviors (such as diet, exercise, stress management, and drug use), socioeconomic status, health care delivery systems, and aging with the intent to improve students' abilities to evaluate health information. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nadine Wicks
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OL01 Nadine Wicks
Online
EASC 104 - Geohazards - Earth in Turmoil (3)

Explore the range of geological hazards that affect the Earth, our environment and humanity. Topics will include the hazards, risks and processes associated with potentially cataclysmic events such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides, and tsunamis. The forecasting and mitigation of the impacts of these hazards will also be investigated. Students with credit for GEOG 312 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

EASC 107 - Economic Geological Resources (3)

An overview of Earth's major economic resources. Topics will include geologic processes which produce significant natural resources including metals, hydrocarbons and other energy resources, industrial minerals, and groundwater. Emphasis will be placed on relations between earth sciences and aspects of economics, business, history, politics, and environmental issues. Much of the focus will be on the changing nature of resource exploration and extraction, and how this may evolve in the near to distant future. Students may not use EASC 107 for credit towards Earth Sciences major or minor program requirements. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Kevin Cameron
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, 4:30–5:50 p.m.
Burnaby
ECON 102 - The World Economy (3)

An overview of the broad economic trends in the development of the world economy over the last five decades with reference to the major debates related to economic interdependence, development and growth, globalization, and the role of the major multilateral economic institutions (IMF, World Bank, OCED, ILO, UN). (lecture/tutorial). Breadth-Social Sciences.

EDUC 100W - Selected Questions and Issues in Education (3)

An introduction to a small but representative sample of basic questions and issues in education. Students will examine questions relating to: the concept or idea of education; learning and the learner; teaching and the teacher; and more generally, the broader contexts of education. This course also introduces students to different ways of exploring educational questions and issues from philosophical and critical analysis, to historical and cross-cultural studies, to empirical research. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit for 300 and 400 level education courses. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Michele Schmidt
Online
OL02 Michele Schmidt
Online
OL03 Daniel Chang
Robert Williamson
Online
GEOG 104 - Climate Change, Water, and Society (3)

An examination of climate change, its interaction with water availability, and how humans cope with these altered circumstances. Students who have completed GEOG 102 prior to the fall 2011 term may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tara Holland
Online
GEOG 333 - Climate Crisis: Understanding a World on Fire (4)

An introduction to the fundamental social and human-geographical dimensions of climate change: the ideas, tools, and institutions through which human communities and institutions are responding (or not) to the challenges of a warming planet. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45 units.

MBB 302 - Energy: From Cells to Society (3)

Energy flow drove the origin of life and is required to sustain life. From molecular machines to ecosystems, the capture and flow of energy defines life. Human use of fossil fuels is explored as a transformative evolutionary development. Prerequisite: 45 units. This course is only open to students in the Faculties of Applied Sciences, Arts and Social Sciences, Communication, Art and Technology, Education, Environment, Beedie School of Business and Health Sciences (Bachelor of Arts Degree Program only). Breadth-Science.

PLAN 100 - Introduction to Planning (3)

Students will be exposed to a broad overview of the field of planning. The course will introduce students to the role of a planner while exploring the practice of planning (human settlements and community planning) in varying contexts within Canada and internationally. Students with credit for PLAN 200 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Laura Tate
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
B101 TBD
REM 320W - Ethics and the Environment (3)

An introduction to the field of environmental ethics. Addresses questions such as what obligations we have to future generations and the natural world, as well as the extent of these obligations. Prerequisite: 45 units. Philosophy Majors and Minors may not take this course for credit towards their major or minor degree. Students who have taken PHIL 333-3 or ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Environmental Ethics" prior to or in 2011 and students with credit in ENV 320W or PHIL 328-3 may not enroll in this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for ENV 321 cannot take REM 321 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

REM 355 - Sustainable Transportation for a Zero-Emissions World (3)

Explores the transportation system and how to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as other sustainability goals. Topics include zero-emissions vehicles, low-carbon fuels, shared mobility, vehicle automation, and reduced vehicle use. An interdisciplinary approach is followed, including analyses of environmental and resource impacts, consumer behaviour, systems, technology change, and climate policy. Prerequisite: 45 units or permission of instructor.

REM 357 - Planning for Sustainable Food Systems (3)

Provides students with the tools to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current food system and will encourage them to critically analyze diverse solutions from both the global South and global North to build a more sustainable food system. Students will work collaboratively with the instructor to examine diverse and interdisciplinary approaches to food sustainability and strengthen their problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken REM 363-3 "Special Topics" in Spring 2019 and Fall 2019 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tammara Soma
TBD

Group B

Students must complete a minimum of three units from the following list of courses*:

ENGL 360 - Popular Writing by Indigenous Authors (4)

Examines works of popular fiction by Indigenous authors, and their use of specific genres (e.g. the mystery novel, vampire thriller, sci fi, comic book). This course may be repeated for credit if a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 30 units or two 200-division English courses. Students who have taken FNST 322 under this topic, or FNST 360 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alexa Manuel
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
INDG 101 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies (3)

Introduces the nature and goals of Indigenous Studies as an academic discipline that emphasizes cultures and homelands of First Peoples. Students with credit for FNST 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sandra Dielissen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OL01 Bryan Myles
Online
INDG 102 - Indigenous Academic Research (4)

Using Indigenous-authored texts and films as sources, INDG 102 will focus on contemporary Indigenous topics and concerns, introducing students to multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary courses of study. Students with credit for EAS 110 and FASS 110 may not take this course for further credit.

INDG 110W - International Indigenous Lifewriting (4)

Exploration of Indigenous forms of research and inquiry (ie. genealogies, oral story-telling, autobiographies). Examine and explore life stories of Indigenous authors from around the world. Students with credit for FNST 110W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

INDG 201W - Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives on History (3)

An examination of fact and ideology in history and historic events involving contact between Indigenous and European peoples. The course will also address questions of research methodologies in studying Indigenous/European relations, such as the evaluation of oral history and written ethnohistoric sources. An additional focus will be on gender as it influences perspectives. Students with credit for FNST 201W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Sandra Dielissen
Online
REM 207 - Indigenous Peoples and Resource Management (3)

Explores a variety of Indigenous perspectives on resource, land and water management in British Columbia. Students are encouraged to critically analyze contemporary resource management/relationship issues (ie. energy, fisheries, forestry) from reconciliation-informed perspectives. Breadth-Social Sciences.

* Students may satisfy this requirement by completing any INDG course with a minimum of three units.

Business Career Passport Requirements

Business Career Passport (BCP) is a mandatory program for Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) students to kick-start their career.

  • Students admitted to the BBA program for the Fall 2017 term onwards are required to complete the program within 12 months of the start of their program.
  • Students admitted to the BBA program from the Fall 2012 term to the Summer 2017 term are required to complete the program prior to graduation.

For more information, click here.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.