Please note:

To view the Spring 2024 Academic Calendar, go to www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2024/spring.html.

Business | Beedie School of Business
Department of Geography | Faculty of Environment
Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2024

Geo Business Joint Major

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Business Administration

Students may opt for a bachelor of arts degree from either the Faculty of Environment, or a bachelor of business administration from the Beedie School of Business. Faculty requirements will be governed by the faculty from which the student chooses to complete a degree.

Admission Requirements

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS - BEEDIE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Joint major applicants should apply to Beedie through the internal transfer process, which is outlined here, after completing 30 units, including the eight lower division courses required for admission, and must either already be accepted to the geography portion of the joint major or be eligible for admission that term. Students not accepted upon initial application may reapply. Unsuccessful applicants are permitted to appeal.

Application Deadlines

Visit https://beedie.sfu.ca/programs/undergraduate/bba-major/how-to-apply for application deadlines.

Grade Requirements

In addition to normal university grade point average requirements, the Beedie School of Business requires a minimum 2.30 overall SFU Business course grade point average for entry into all 300 and 400 division business courses.

A minimum 2.30 overall SFU Business course grade point average is required for graduation from a business major, joint major, or double degree program.

For a course to be accepted as fulfilling a prerequisite, or for a lower division requirement, or for a core course to be accepted in a student’s program in business, a student must have obtained a minimum grade of C- (C minus).

Letters of Permission

The Beedie School of Business does not normally approve letters of permission for students already enrolled at Simon Fraser University.

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Requirements

Business Lower Division Requirements

Students must complete all of

BUS 217W - Critical Thinking in Business (3)

Examine and review today's global economy through critical analysis of differing perspectives. Develop and improve critical thinking and communication skills appropriate to the business environment. Prerequisite: BUS 201 with a minimum grade of C- and 15 units; OR 45 units and corequisite: BUS 202; OR business administration joint major, joint honours, or double degree students with 45 units; OR data science major with 15 units. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ilia BYKOV
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Matthew Martell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Matthew Martell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D400 Luana Carcano
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D401 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D402 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 237 - Introduction to Business Technology Management (3)

Introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to make full use of business information systems. Demonstrates how information systems are used by organizations to improve productivity and create competitive advantage. Provides hands on training in productivity tools including Excel, Visio, Access and Web design tools. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jie Mein Goh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Jie Mein Goh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 7:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 251 - Financial Accounting I (3)

An introduction to financial accounting, including accounting terminology, understanding financial statements, analysis of a business entity using financial statements. Includes also time value of money and a critical review of the conventional accounting system. Prerequisite: 12 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Grant Mowbray
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Grant Mowbray
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 254 - Managerial Accounting I (3)

Theory and methods of cost compilation for managerial planning, control and decision making; the use of budgets and analysis in planning and controlling operations, establishing supervisory and departmental responsibility, and various techniques of measuring results. Prerequisite: BUS 251 with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Weiming Liu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Weiming Liu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Surrey
BUS 272 - Behaviour in Organizations (3)

Theories, concepts and issues in the field of organizational behaviour with an emphasis on individual and team processes. Core topics include employee motivation and performance, stress management, communication, work perceptions and attitudes, decision-making, team dynamics, employee involvement and conflict management. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sam Thiara
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Sam Thiara
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D205 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey

and one of

BUS 232 - Business Statistics (3)

An introduction to business statistics (descriptive and inferential statistics) with a heavy emphasis on applications and the use of EXCEL. Students will be required to use statistical applications to solve business problems. Corequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. Students with credit for BUEC 232 or ECON 233 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Negar Ganjouhaghighi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Negar Ganjouhaghighi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
ECON 233 - Introduction to Economic Data and Statistics (3)

Introduces statistical methods, concepts and their application to economic data using both spreadsheets (e.g., Excel) and a specialized statistical programming language such as R. Prerequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157 may be taken concurrently with ECON 233. Students who have taken ECON 333 first may not then take this course for further credit. STAT 270 or BUS 232 will be accepted in lieu of this course.

GEOG 251 - Quantitative Geography (3)

An introduction to basic quantitative techniques for the collection of geographic data. Topics include describing data, gathering samples, theoretical distributions, linking samples and populations, testing significance, and exploring spatial relationships all within practical, real-world application contexts. Quantitative.

STAT 270 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic laws of probability, sample distributions. Introduction to statistical inference and applications. Prerequisite: or Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158, with a minimum grade of C-. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Pai
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
OL01 Gamage Perera
Online
OP01 TBD

and one of

BUS 207 - Managerial Economics (3)

Emphasis is upon the relevance of economic models to business decision-making and, in particular, upon the rational analysis of choice alternatives within the firm. Course will include consideration of optimizing techniques and analysis of risk, demand, production and profit in addition to examination of long-term investment decisions and business forecasting. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or ECON 113, ECON 105 or ECON 115, MATH 157, all with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. Students with credit for ECON 201 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mohamad Sadri Karami
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Mohamad Sadri Karami
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
ECON 201 - Microeconomic Theory I: Competitive Behavior (4)

Aspects of microeconomic theory involving competitive markets. Topics include the behavior of households and firms, partial equilibrium analysis of product and factor markets, and general equilibrium. Prerequisite: ECON 103 with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 113 with a minimum grade of A-; ECON 105 with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 115 with a minimum grade of A-; MATH 157 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for ECON 301 may not complete this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Joshua Boitnott
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

ECON 103 - Principles of Microeconomics (4)

The principal elements of theory concerning utility and value, price and costs, factor analysis, productivity, labor organization, competition and monopoly, and the theory of the firm. Students with credit for ECON 200 cannot take ECON 103 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gulriz Barkin
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
ECON 113 - Introduction to Microeconomics (3)

Focused on basic competencies in microeconomics, this course is suitable for business and other students not intending to specialize in economics. Topics include gains from trade, supply and demand, prices, competition and monopoly, market failures, and government policies. Economic literacy is an important part of the course. Students who have taken ECON 103 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

and one of

ECON 105 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4)

The principal elements of theory concerning money and income, distribution, social accounts, public finance, international trade, comparative systems, and development and growth. Students with credit for ECON 205 cannot take ECON 105 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brian Krauth
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
ECON 115 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (3)

Focused on basic competencies in macroeconomics, this course is suitable for business and other students not intending to specialize in economics. Topics include GDP, economic growth, business cycles, unemployment, inflation, money, monetary and fiscal policies, exchange rates, government debt, globalization and trade policy. Economic literacy is an important part of the course. Students who have taken ECON 105 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

and one of

MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mahsa Faizrahnemoon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 154 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Designed for students specializing in the life sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; elementary functions, optimization and approximation methods, and their applications, integration, and differential equations; mathematical models of biological processes and their implementation and analysis using software. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 157 - Calculus I for the Social Sciences (3)

Designed for students specializing in business or the social sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions and their application to business, economics, optimization and approximation methods; introduction to functions of several variables with emphasis on partial derivatives and extrema. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 154 may not take MATH 157 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Tupper
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OP01 TBD

and one of*

ENGL 111W - Literary Classics in English (3)

Examines literary “classics”, variously defined, apprehending them both on their own terms and within larger critical conversations. May incorporate the comparative study of work in related artistic fields and engage relevant media trends. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 101W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Torsten Kehler
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
ENGL 112W - Literature Now (3)

Introduces students to contemporary works of literature in English and/or contemporary approaches to interpreting literature. May focus on one or multiple genres. Includes attention to writing skills. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Mary Ann Gillies
TBD
B101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
ENGL 113W - Literature and Performance (3)

Introduces students to plays and performance works created and adapted for the stage, and/or the performative dimensions of other literary forms. May be organized historically, generically or thematically. The course may also explore the links between literary and performance theory. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 103W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

ENGL 114W - Language and Purpose (3)

Introduces students to the relationships between writing and purpose, between the features of texts and their meaning and effects. May focus on one or more literary or non-literary genres, including (but not limited to) essays, oratory, autobiography, poetry, and journalism. Includes attention to writing skills. Students with credit for ENGL 104W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

ENGL 115W - Literature and Culture (3)

An Introduction to the study of literature within the wider cultural field, with a focus on contemporary issues across genres and media. Students with credit for ENGL 105W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

ENGL 199W - Writing to Persuade (3)

An introduction to reading and writing from a rhetorical perspective. The course treats reading and writing as activities that take place in particular circumstances and situations, in contrast to the traditional emphasis on decontextualized, formal features of texts. It prepares students for reading and writing challenges they are likely to encounter within and beyond the classroom. Prerequisite: 12 units. Students with credit for ENGL 199 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GEOG 266W - Geography in Practice (3)

An introduction to what geographers do in applied contexts, how geographic concepts relate to applied skills, and how to communicate what geography is and why geographical approaches are useful. The course will emphasize written and oral communication skills through regular writing assignments, feedback, and direct engagement with professional geographers. Prerequisite: One of: GEOG 100, GEOG 102, GEOG 104, GEOG 111. Writing.

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 or PHIL 300 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Martin Hahn
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking (3)

An introduction to the tools of reasoning used in everyday life and in science. The overall aim of the course is to understand what makes good reasoning good, what makes bad reasoning bad, and how to do more of the former and less of the latter. Topics include: construction, analysis, and evaluation of arguments; logic and probability; updating beliefs and making decisions; designing experiments; interpreting statistics; identifying fallacies and biases. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL XX1 may not take this course for further credit. Q/Breadth-Social Sci/Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lyle Crawford
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

An introduction to the theory of deductive reasoning. We consider deductive arguments in philosophy, in everyday life, and in mathematical proofs, and discuss what distinguishes valid inferences from fallacies. The course will cover propositional logic and first-order logic. Open to all students. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 120W - Moral and Legal Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of moral and legal issues we confront in our dealings with the state and our fellow human beings, such as: Is it wrong to break the law? Should pornography and recreational drugs be illegal? Do animals have rights? Is there a duty to admit immigrants? Are there duties to the world's poor? Are indigenous peoples owed reparations? Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Michaela Lucas
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHIL 150 - Great Works in the History of Philosophy (3)

A survey of some classic texts in the history of philosophy. See the course outline for more detail on the specific figures and themes covered. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 151 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

WL 101W - Writing in World Literature (3)

Explores literary texts from diverse linguistic and cultural origins while introducing students to the fundamentals of comparative literary analysis and critical writing. May examine cross-cultural interactions, or compare texts thematically. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

WL 103W - Early World Literatures (3)

Introduces ways of comparing early world literatures across time and space. May explore fundamental themes such as love, heroism, or the underworld. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

WL 104W - Modern World Literatures (3)

Introduces ways of comparing modern world literatures across time and space. May explore topics such as revolution, technology, or existentialism. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rastin Mehri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 Rastin Mehri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 Rastin Mehri
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
WL 105W - World Literature Lab (3)

Incorporates academic and creative writing assignments through hands-on exploration of language, literacy, and literature across cultures. Includes translation exercises and writing workshops. Additional language fluency highly recommended but not required. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

* Any one of these courses may be replaced by any three unspecified transfer units in English or in ENGL-Writing at the 100- or 200-level.

Geography Lower Division Requirements

Students must complete all of

GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

GEOG 162 - Canada (3)

The geographical character of Canada; the Canadian environment; regional differences in socio-economic growth. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shivanand Balram
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Wed, Fri, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Wed, Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Leanne Roderick
Online
GEOG 161 - Urban Change: An Introduction to Dynamic Places (3)

An introduction to geographical perspectives on urbanized and urbanizing places, spaces, landscapes, and environments. The course focuses on the dynamism that characterizes cities and urban regions. Using a geographical social science approach, it provides an overview of how cities are shaped by humans and how we are shaped by cities.

and one of

GEOG 104 - Climate Change, Water, and Society (3)

An examination of climate change, its interaction with water availability, and how humans cope with these altered circumstances. Students who have completed GEOG 102 prior to the fall 2011 term may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tara Holland
Online
GEOG 118 - The Water Planet (3)

An overview of the processes that control water supply to natural ecosystems and human civilization. Hydrologic cycle, floods, droughts, groundwater. Patterns of water use, threats to water quality, effects of global climate change on future water supplies. Water issues facing British Columbia. Breadth-Science.

and two of

BUS 275 - Business in a Sustainable Society (3)

Businesses and business leaders have a key role to play in supporting a sustainable future. In this course, we examine what it means to be a responsible business and how businesses can do their part to be a catalyst for system-level change. We will also consider our own roles in supporting the necessary transition to a more regenerative and reconciled economy. Prerequisite: 12 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kam Phung
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Emily Salmon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
GEOG 221 - Economic Worlds (3)

The fundamentals of economics geography, the study of the forces that shape the arrangement of economic activity in the real world. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 241 - People, Place, Society (3)

An introduction to key concepts and contexts in contemporary geographical approaches to social practices, meanings, and struggles. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 100, INDG 101, SA 101, or SA 150. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 261 - Encountering the City (3)

An introduction to key concepts and themes in contemporary geographical approaches to cities and urbanization. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 102. Breadth-Social Sciences.

and two of

ARCH 286 - Cultural Heritage Management (3)

Examines cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build communities and nations. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage. Prerequisite: 30 units including one of ARCH 100, ARCH 101, ARCH 201, GEOG 100 or REM 100. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Welch
Jun 25 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
INDG 101 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies (3)

Introduces the nature and goals of Indigenous Studies as an academic discipline that emphasizes cultures and homelands of First Peoples. Students with credit for FNST 101 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sandra Dielissen
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
OL01 Bryan Myles
Online
INDG 286 - Indigenous Peoples and British Columbia: An Introduction (3)

Study of Indigenous peoples of BC and effects of historical and political processes on their livelihoods and homelands. Overview of indigeneity and connection to urbanization. Examines linguistic diversity and endangered state of BC First Nations languages; Indigenous ethnography; land rights movement; traditional cultural practices/beliefs; and social, educational and economic disparity. Prerequisite: Recommended: INDG 101. Students with credit for FNST 286 or SA 286 may not take this course for further credit.

REM 207 - Indigenous Peoples and Resource Management (3)

Explores a variety of Indigenous perspectives on resource, land and water management in British Columbia. Students are encouraged to critically analyze contemporary resource management/relationship issues (ie. energy, fisheries, forestry) from reconciliation-informed perspectives. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Upper Division Requirements

Business Core Courses

Students complete all of

BUS 303 - Business, Society and Ethics (3)

Examines the context of business in society and the paradigms, frameworks, and theories that shape how we think about business ethics and make ethical decisions. Incorporates recent cross-disciplinary research in the development of reflective practice, moral literacy, and decision-making under conditions of uncertainty, ambiguity, complexity, and diverse competing interests. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Daniel Hooley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Sara Graves
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Shafik Bhalloo
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Daniel Hooley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 312 - Introduction to Finance (3)

Role and function of financial managers, financial analysis, compound interest valuation and capital budgeting, management of current assets, introduction to financial instruments and institutions. Prerequisite: BUS 254 (or 324) with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Recommended: BUS 207, ECON 201, or ECON 301. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tara Immell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Tara Immell
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 343 - Introduction to Marketing (3)

The environment of marketing; relation of social sciences to marketing; evaluation of marketing theory and research; assessment of demand, consumer behaviour analysis; market institutions; method and mechanics of distribution in domestic, foreign and overseas markets; sales organization; advertising; new product development, publicity and promotion; marketing programs. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Claudia Gomez Borquez
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 8:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Claudia Gomez Borquez
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Surrey
D205 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
BUS 393 - Commercial Law (3)

Common law, equity, and statute law; contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments; partnership and corporation law; international commercial law. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shafik Bhalloo
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Jordan Jutras
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Surrey
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Surrey
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Surrey
E100 Robin Elliott
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 7:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 478 - Strategy (3) ^

Students will demonstrate strategic decision making and critical thinking skills by integrating knowledge and skills acquired in prior course work within the various functional areas of business. Students will conduct rigorous and comprehensive strategic analyses of firms and industries which relate to the strategic fit between internal and external organizational environments, competitive dynamics over an industry’s life cycle, and value creation and competitive advantage through the development of effective corporate and business-level strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 207 (or ECON 201 or ECON 301), BUS 312, 343, 360W and either BUS 374 or 381, all with a minimum grade of C-; 90 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Edward Bukszar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D200 Yuri Taira
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Surrey
D300 Edward Bukszar
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D400 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D500 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Sean Hackett
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 6:00–8:50 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

BUS 374 - Organization Theory (3)

Organizations, not individuals, are this course's basic unit of analysis. We will seek to answer questions about organizations, such as why they exist, what objectives they pursue, how they function, how they survive and grow, who they interact with, how they interact with each other, how they are evaluated, and how they respond to failure. In answering these questions, the course will introduce students to major theoretical perspectives and issues studied in organizational theory. Prerequisite: 45 units; BUS 272 with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rajiv Kozhikode
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BUS 381 - Introduction to Human Resource Management (3)

Subjects include human resource planning, job analysis and design, recruitment, employment equity, selection and placement, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, training and development, occupational health and safety, and industrial relations. For each subject an overview of current Canadian issues and practices is presented. Prerequisite: BUS 272 with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Melissa McCrae
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Bahareh Assadi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 6:30–9:20 p.m.
Burnaby

BUS 360W is recommended but not required. BUS 360W will be waived as a prerequisite for 400 division business courses for those in approved business joint programs, provided that an alternative approved upper division W course is in progress, or has been completed. Students should consult with a Beedie School of Business Academic Advisor for further information on obtaining a waiver.

BUS 360W must be completed at Simon Fraser University in accordance with the WQB requirements.

^ Must be completed at Simon Fraser University.

Business 400 Division Requirements

Students must complete at least one 400 division BUS course, worth a minimum of three units (excluding BUS 478 and practicum courses).

Business Concentration

Students may choose to complete one or more business concentrations by meeting the concentration requirements listed on the business major page of the calendar.

Geography Upper Division Requirements

Students are required to successfully complete a minimum of 24 units of upper division geography courses to expand their understanding in the areas of spatial innovation, social responsibility and justice, and global perspectives, as follows.

Students must complete

GEOG 355 - Geographical Information Science II (4)

An examination of technical components of GIS. Topics include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

and one of

GEOG 325 - Geographies of Consumption (4)

Spaces, places, landscapes, and scales of consumption emphasizing commodity cultures, marketing, retail, ideology, subjectivity, objects, technology, and tourism. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 364 - Cities and Crisis (4)

An examination of urban geographies of crisis, concentrating on what crisis is, what it is used for, how it is differentially experienced, and how it is distributed unevenly. Case studies of environmental, economic, social, and political crises are the main focus. The course concludes by addressing the future(s) of cities. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

and one of

GEOG 321 - Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

Examines the historical development, spatial organization, and social impact of market function, firm structure and operation, economic policy, and regulation and deregulation at various scales from local to global, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 333 - Climate Crisis: Understanding a World on Fire (4)

An introduction to the fundamental social and human-geographical dimensions of climate change: the ideas, tools, and institutions through which human communities and institutions are responding (or not) to the challenges of a warming planet. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45 units.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

Students must also complete an additional three courses from any of the following course groupings. Courses that appear both in the required options above and in the course groupings below cannot be double counted towards the degree.

Spatial Innovation

BUS 336 - Data Analytics and Visualization (3)

Investigate data analytics, visualization, and modeling approaches relevant to business decisions. The course will investigate three important pillars of analytics including decision analytics, predictive analytics, and data visualization. Prerequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; BUS 232, ECON 233, or STAT 270, with a minimum grade of C-; 45 units. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gohram Gohram
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
E100 Negar Ganjouhaghighi
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 5:30–8:20 p.m.
Burnaby
GEOG 351 - Multimedia Cartography (4)

Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 352 - Spatial Analysis (4)

Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. Topics include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 356 - 3D GIScience (4)

Introduction to 3D spatial data, 3D analysis, and 3D visualization for spatial problems. Students will gain skills in 3D aspects of GIScience concepts; data generation and use; analysis and simulation; visualization and its use for interpretation and communication. Prerequisite: GEOG 255.

GEOG 451 - Spatial Modeling (4)

Spatial models for the representation and simulation of physical, human and environmental processes. GIS and spatial analysis software are used in the laboratory for model development, from problem definition and solution to visualization. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270; one of GEOG 351, 352, 353, 355 or 356. Quantitative.

GEOG 455 - Theoretical and Applied GIS (4)

A critical examination of advanced topics in GIS, such as: boundary definition, expert systems and artificial intelligence, error and uncertainty, and scale in a digital context. Examines social applications and the roles of GIS in society. Students will design original projects, including data acquisition, analysis, and web site development. Prerequisite: GEOG 355. Students with credit for GEOG 452 or GEOG 455W may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

or GEOG 455W - Theoretical and Applied GIS (4)

A critical examination of advanced topics in GIS, such as: boundary definition, expert systems and artificial intelligence, error and uncertainty, and scale in a digital context. Examines social applications and the roles of GIS in society. Students will design original projects, including data acquisition, analysis, and web site development. Prerequisite: GEOG 355. Students with credit for GEOG 452 or GEOG 455 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

GEOG 457 - Geovisualization Interfaces (4)

The concepts, theories, and technology behind interactive and immersive interface technologies used for geospatial visualization. Applications and implications for GIScience and spatial knowledge acquisition. Combines GIScience, spatial cognition, and virtual environments/interface research perspectives. Prerequisite: GEOG 356. Students with credit for GEOG 457 (STT) Geospatial Virtual Environments in fall 2005 or fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

Social Responsibility and Justice

GEOG 324 - Geography of Transportation (4)

An empirical and theoretical examination of the geographical aspects of transportation systems. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 325 - Geographies of Consumption (4)

Spaces, places, landscapes, and scales of consumption emphasizing commodity cultures, marketing, retail, ideology, subjectivity, objects, technology, and tourism. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 328 - Labour Geographies (4)

An examination of contemporary debates in Labour Geography, surveying geographical approaches to work and employment. Lectures will explore the relationships between space, place and labour market change in the context of globalization and uneven development. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or LBST 101. Students with credit for LBST 328 may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 340 - Queer Geographies (4)

What does sexuality have to do with spaces and places? This question is at the core of this course where we’ll examine how sexual norms and queerness are defined and defied through different geographies. We will learn how Black, Indigenous, and queers of colour think about and build social movements at the intersection of sexuality, space, and place. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or GSWS 100 or GSWS 101 or GSWS 102 or INDG 101 or SA 101 or HSCI 120 or CMNS 130.

GEOG 362W - Gentrification and Urban Change (4)

Contemporary cases and conceptualizations of gentrification and related processes of urban change. Central themes include: political, economic, social, and cultural manifestations of gentrification; class, gender, and racialization; the role of development, planning, architecture, the arts, and resistance movements; and gentrification’s global geographies. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100. Students with credit for GEOG 362 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GEOG 363 - Urban Planning and Policy (4)

An introduction to the major approaches and key ideas of the professions of urban governance; urban planning and urban policy. Through a focus on contemporary theory, process-based understanding, and specific issues and examples, the course examines key trends and interventions and promotes critical reflection on urban development. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Leanne Roderick
TBD
B101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Vancouver
B102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, 3:30–5:20 p.m.
Vancouver
B103 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, 5:30–7:20 p.m.
Vancouver
GEOG 364 - Cities and Crisis (4)

An examination of urban geographies of crisis, concentrating on what crisis is, what it is used for, how it is differentially experienced, and how it is distributed unevenly. Case studies of environmental, economic, social, and political crises are the main focus. The course concludes by addressing the future(s) of cities. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 365 - Race, Resistance and Urban Space (4)

An exploration of how race informs the aesthetics, politics and development of urban space. Examines racial formation in transnational urban contexts, and how cultural production and social movements are utilized to address racial inequities and envision urban futures. Prerequisite: At least 45 units.

GEOG 385 - Food and the City (4)

An exploration of how food is related to cities, giving particular attention to the culture and politics of food production, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

GEOG 387 - Geography and Gender (4)

Geographical perspectives on gender and sexuality. This course investigates feminist theory in geography and its analysis of home, city, nation, state, global economy, colonialism, and migration. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 421 - Geographical Political Economy (4)

Examines the historical development of the material spaces and places affected by changing capitalist dynamics and the dominant theories through which they are explained, legitimized, and criticized, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: GEOG 321. Students who received credit for GEOG 421 (STT), Advanced Contemporary Capitalism, may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 424 - Cities, Transportation, Infrastructure (4)

An exploration of the relationships between the development of cities, transportation, and infrastructure from an economic geography perspective. Greater Vancouver provides a location to explore, apply, and critique the theoretical perspectives presented in seminar. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 323, 324, 362, or 363.

GEOG 440 - Property, Land, Society (4)

An examination of property, particularly in relation to land, with an emphasis on its social, political, and spatial dimensions. Prerequisite: 60 units, including eight of upper division geography. Students with credit for GEOG 440W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 486 - Health Care Geographies (4)

An in-depth examination of health care and health services from a health geography perspective, including place-based considerations of care spaces, health human resources, and new forms of health care. Prerequisite: GEOG 386 or HSCI 305.

INDG 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for FNST 433 may not take this course for further credit.

Global Perspectives

GEOG 321 - Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

Examines the historical development, spatial organization, and social impact of market function, firm structure and operation, economic policy, and regulation and deregulation at various scales from local to global, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 333 - Climate Crisis: Understanding a World on Fire (4)

An introduction to the fundamental social and human-geographical dimensions of climate change: the ideas, tools, and institutions through which human communities and institutions are responding (or not) to the challenges of a warming planet. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45 units.

GEOG 381 - Territory, Power, State (4)

Surveys the manner in which power relations are expressed territorially. Attention given to such topics as state sovereignty, colonialism, rights, and law. Prerequisite: At least 45 units. Students with credit for GEOG 381W may not take this course for further credit.

or GEOG 381W - Territory, Power, State (4)

Surveys the manner in which power relations are expressed territorially. Attention given to such topics as state sovereignty, colonialism, rights, and law. Prerequisite: At least 45 units. Students with credit for GEOG 381 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

GEOG 382 - World on the Move (4)

The world is on the move. Migrants seeking better opportunities cross paths with refugees fleeing persecution. Some are helped and welcomed, many encounter barriers and threats, while identities, including class, race, gender, sexuality, mediate their prospects. This course's geographic perspective clarifies these complexities by combining conceptual analyses with contemporary cases. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 386 - Health Geography (4)

A survey of health issues from a geographic perspective, including major spatial influences shaping the health status of populations and health-place relationships. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including either GEOG 100 or HSCI 130. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

GEOG 423 - Capitalist Natures (4)

An exploration of our political, social, and economic systems, their ecological limitations, and related questions of inequality. It explores the histories, dynamics, logics, effects, and limitations of these systems. The evolution and effects of capitalism, specifically with respect to nonhuman natures, will be a focus. Prerequisite: GEOG 321 or GEOG 389W.

GEOG 429 - Racial Capitalism and Beyond (4)

Explores the theoretical foundations in critical racial geographies. Also examines the modern history and reach of Black, subaltern, and decolonial thought in global context, with particular attention to relations of capital, race, nation-state, social reproduction, and the unfolding of contending geographies beyond the dominant world order. Prerequisite: At least 60 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 442 - A World of Cities (4)

An exploration of how cities shape the contemporary globalized world, focusing on key contemporary academic approaches. Highlights geographical and multi-disciplinary work on global-urban relations, networks, structures, and mobilities. Prerequisite: 60 credit hours, including Geog 362. Students who have taken GEOG 442 STT, Global Cities, may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 465 - Geographies of Conquest and Liberation (4)

An exploration of theories and geographies of conquest and liberation to analyze present-day struggles for abolition and decolonization. We will weave epistemologies from across the Americas to understand how different struggles for liberation are spatially connected amid colonialism, racial capitalism and empire. Prerequisite: At least 60 units, including GEOG 241.

GEOG 497 - International Field Study (5)

A fieldwork based study of a selected region conducted in an international setting. Emphasis is placed on how to understand landscapes by relating concepts and models with direct observation, inference and collection of field evidence, as well as published literature on the selected region. Prerequisite: At least 60 units including 12 units of upper division geography courses.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student's major subject; two courses (minimum three units each)

Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division; two courses (total six units or more)
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth

Must be outside the student's major subject, and may be lower or upper division:

Two courses (total six units or more) Social Sciences: B-Soc
Two courses (total six units or more) Humanities: B-Hum
Two courses (total six units or more) Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth

Two courses (total six units or more) outside the student's major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements).

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

Business Career Passport Requirements

Business Career Passport (BCP) is a mandatory program for Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) students to kick-start their career.

  • Students admitted to the BBA program for the Fall 2017 term onwards are required to complete the program within 12 months of the start of their program.
  • Students admitted to the BBA program from the Fall 2012 term to the Summer 2017 term are required to complete the program prior to graduation.

For more information, click here.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.