Summer 2024 - ARCH 286 D100

Cultural Heritage Management (3)

Class Number: 3847

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Jun 25 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
    Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 16, 2024
    Fri, 12:00–3:00 p.m.
    Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    30 units including one of ARCH 100, ARCH 101, ARCH 201, GEOG 100 or REM 100.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Examines cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build communities and nations. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage. Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

An examination of cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build family, community, and national solidarity. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of and tool for cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by customary institutions as well as national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage.

-> Every person maintains a dynamic relationship with experienced and imparted pasts and makes decisions about what to adopt (or not) as meaningful and useful.

-> Heritage is how humans enlist the past to negotiate values, meanings and identities at social and spatial scales ranging from intimate, personal and local to universal and global.   

-> Archaeology is one part of humanity’s quest to create meaning and utility out of shared legacies of traditions, objects and places.

-> Cultural heritage and campaigns to manage it are ubiquitous and freely available to richly illustrate and provide examples of CHM processes and products

-> Rapid expansion and diversification in heritage identification, interpretation, and management is creating demands for interdisciplinary expertise in Canada and globally.

Grading

  • Student Preparation and Participation 15%
  • Classroom Quizzes 30%
  • Individual Short Assignments 25%
  • Group Assignments 30%

NOTES:

ARCH 286 combines lectures, seminars, quizzes on readings, student presentations, peer feedback exercises, and group work. Students are expected to come to class ready to participate in discussions on required readings and weekly topics. Group projects and presentations involve written submissions from individual students and oral presentations by groups, which are peer-graded using a form distributed in class.

Quizzes are completed online during class, and students are required to bring a device capable of connecting to the Internet and using Canvas. Students must arrive on-time for class, as quiz windows will opened for 30 minutes or less. Quiz windows will not be re-opened for late arrivals. Paper copies of quizzes will not be offered.

Archaeology and CHM are intrinsically social and collaborative endeavors, so students are encouraged to network in acquiring, using, and sharing ideas. At the same time, each scholar is solely responsible for their conduct.

Materials

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Department Undergraduate Notes:

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.

Deferred grades will be given only on the basis of authenticated medical disability.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

RELIGIOUS ACCOMMODATION

Students with a faith background who may need accommodations during the term are encouraged to assess their needs as soon as possible and review the Multifaith religious accommodations website. The page outlines ways they begin working toward an accommodation and ensure solutions can be reached in a timely fashion.