Course Descriptions

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (Chem 215)

An Introduction to Analytical Chemistry is a 4 credit core chemistry course that provides an overview of the key concepts and methods of the field. The course is focused on developing critical thinking skills and an understanding of essential principles of analytical chemistry. Background information on techniques and concepts in qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis will be provided through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and selected readings from scientific reports and the course textbook. This knowledge will be applied through weekly laboratory exercises to develop hands-on skills. Grading is based on in class participation, in class exams, independently written detailed laboratory reports, laboratory notebooks, and a comprehensive final examination. Typically, 70 to 80 students meet three times a week, including one four hour period for laboratory exercises.

Introduction to Instrumental Analysis (Chem 316)

An Introduction to Instrumental Analysis is a 4 credit core chemistry course that provides an overview of the fundamental concepts and techniques used in modern analytical chemistry. The course is structured around major themes in the field of analytical chemistry, and is supported by readings from scientific reports and the course textbook. Background information on the use of instrumentation for both qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis will be provided through lectures and in class discussions. Hands-on skills for many of the techniques discussed in class will be developed through weekly laboratory exercises. Grading is based on in class participation, in class quizzes and exams, independently written laboratory reports, laboratory notebooks, and a comprehensive final examination. Typically, 35 to 40 students meet four times a week, including one tutorial and one four hour period for laboratory exercises.

Chemistry of the Aqueous Environment (Chem 371)

Chemistry of the Aqueous Environment is a 3 credit chemistry elective that provides an introduction into the fundamental concepts and techniques relevant to aquatic chemistry, and their importance to both environmental and industrial chemistry. The course is structured around major themes in the field of aquatic chemistry, and is supported by readings from scientific reports and the course textbook. Background information on aquatic acid-base and redox chemistry, thermodynamics as it relates to aquatic systems, toxic substances found in the aquatic environment, waste water treatment, and related topics will be provided through lectures and in class discussions. Grading is based on in class participation, in class quizzes and exams, take-home problem sets, independently written detailed reports and in class presentations, and a comprehensive final examination. Typically, 25 to 35 students meet four times a week, including once for a tutorial with in class exercises.

Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (Chem 419/819)

Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry is a 3 credit chemistry elective that discusses advances in the analytical sciences through looking at progress, challenges and opportunities therein. This class reviews the analytical techniques that are being developed in the areas of air, water and food quality, healthcare management, new electronics technologies, and chemical based energy processes. Topics include an investigation into the state-of-the-art technologies, the demands of each of these fields, and the needs and opportunities for development of new analytical techniques to address these needs. A particular focus for this class includes, but not be limited to, nanoscale materials as these relate to each of these fields of importance. Grading is based on in class participation, in class quizzes and exams, take-home problem sets, independently written detailed reports, and in class presentations. Typically, 15 to 20 students meet for four hours during the week with in class discussions and exercises.

Chemistry Graduate Student Seminar (Chem 801)

The Chemistry Graduate Student Seminar course is a 3 credit chemistry elective that provides a forum for informally discussing scientific literature (both in the media and in peer-reviewed works) and for developing presentation and critical thinking skills. The course is structured around a diverse range of topics in chemistry, including analytical, physical, organic, inorganic, materials, and biological chemistry. Students learn skills required for writing grant proposals, as well as presenting research ideas and results through an oral presentation. Grading is based on in class participation, student seminars, and written reviews and summaries of scientific work. Typically, 15 to 20 students meet as a class on a weekly basis.

M.Sc. Research Proposal and Examination (Chem 802)

The M.Sc. Research Proposal and Examination is a 3 credit chemistry course required by all M.Sc. students. This course provides a forum for each student to present a written report on his/her research, to make an oral presentation, and to answer questions relating to their proposed research during this oral examination. The course is structured to evaluate each student's preparedness for being in the M.Sc. program and is taken during the first year in the Chemistry graduate program. The examination committee is composed of Faculty from the Department Chemistry. Grading is based on in class participation, the written report, the oral presentation and response to questions during the examination. Typically, 15 to 20 students meet as a class on a weekly basis.

Ph.D. Candidacy Examination (Chem 808)

The Ph.D. Candidacy Examination is a 3 credit chemistry course required by all Ph.D. students. This course provides a forum for each student to present a written report on his/her research, to make an oral presentation, and to answer questions relating to their proposed research during this oral examination. The course is structured to evaluate each student's preparedness for being in the Ph.D. program and is taken during the fourth or fifth term in the Chemistry graduate program. The examination committee is composed of Faculty from the Department Chemistry. Grading is based on in class participation, the written report, the oral presentation and response to questions during the examination. Typically, 15 to 20 students meet as a class on a weekly basis.

CHEMISTRY GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR (CHEM 801)

The Chemistry Graduate Student Seminar course is a 3 credit chemistry elective that provides a forum for informally discussing scientific literature (both in the media and in peer-reviewed works) and for developing presentation and critical thinking skills. The course is structured around a diverse range of topics in chemistry, including analytical, physical, organic, inorganic, materials, and biological chemistry. Students learn skills required for writing grant proposals, as well as presenting research ideas and results through an oral presentation. Grading is based on in class participation, student seminars, and written reviews and summaries of scientific work. Typically, 15-20 students meet as a class on a weekly basis.

CHEMISTRY GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR (CHEM 801)

The Chemistry Graduate Student Seminar course is a 3 credit chemistry elective that provides a forum for informally discussing scientific literature (both in the media and in peer-reviewed works) and for developing presentation and critical thinking skills. The course is structured around a diverse range of topics in chemistry, including analytical, physical, organic, inorganic, materials, and biological chemistry. Students learn skills required for writing grant proposals, as well as presenting research ideas and results through an oral presentation. Grading is based on in class participation, student seminars, and written reviews and summaries of scientific work. Typically, 15-20 students meet as a class on a weekly basis.

Teaching Schedule

Future courses may be subject to change.