About Us

What is Restorative Justice? "Restorative justice represents a paradigm change from thinking about justice as a mechanism for social control to thinking about justice as a mechanism for social engagement," says Dr. Brenda Morrison, the director of Simon Fraser University's Centre for Restorative Justice.

"We know that people who are engaged in healthy ways socially and emotionally make better decisions, and so restorative justice seeks to be socially and emotionally intelligent justice."

The Centre for Restorative Justice is a resource and research centre dedicated to promoting the values and principles of restorative justice through education, research, and dialogue with academics, practitioners and community. In partnership with individuals, the community and justice agencies, The Centre was founded in 2002 by faculty members in the Simon Fraser University School of Criminology.

The Centre is located in:

School of Criminology,
Arts and Social Sciences Complex 1,
Room 10216

Over the last decade, Canada has received international recognition for innovation in the restorative justice field. In particular, the Lower Mainland of British Columbia has a large concentration of leading academics and practitioners in restorative justice, providing an excellent foundation for growth as an educational centre designed to bridge the gaps between practitioners and academics, research and practice.

The Centre for Restorative Justice provides students of Simon Fraser University with work and volunteer opportunities, access to resources related to restorative justice, as well as a meeting place to experience community. The Centre facilitates opportunities for academics and practitioners to form partnerships, while enabling access to relevant and up-to-date research and evaluation. In addition, the Centre is always actively seeking opportunities to facilitate knowledge building, information sharing, and community through conferences, lectures and roundtables.

Dr. Brenda Morrison

Dr. Brenda Morrison is a Director of the Centre for Restorative Justice and an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology. She is a social psychologist with field experience in outdoor education, government administration and restorative justice. A particular focus of her work relates to schools communities, and the institutions that serve these communities.

Her teaching and research interests include transformative and restorative justice, school violence and safety, conflict and cooperation, shame-management and social identity, the self and self-interest.  Dr. Morrison teaches: CRIM 315 (Introduction to Restorative Justice); CRIM 442 (Restorative Justice Praxis); CRIM 417 (Safe Schools and Communities: Restorative Pedagogy and Practice).

Dr. Morrison is Co-Chair of the Safe Schools and Communities Special Interest Group of the American Education Research Association and a member of the Scientific Committee of the International Observatory of Violence in Schools.  She has also chaired many panels on restorative justice and schools for the World Congress of Criminology, as well as a number of other Associations.  She is a research partner with PREVNet (Promoting Relationships Eliminating Violence Network), within Canada’s Networks of Centres of Excellence.  In British Columbia, she is a member of the working group for Social Responsibility and Collaboration Learning in Education.  Locally, she is an active board member for the North Shore Restorative Justice Society.

Steering Committee Members

There are currently five members of the Centre for Restorative Justice.  Each member makes a unique contribution to the Centre through her or his experience, expertise, and interests in the field of restorative justice.

Dr. Brian Burtch

Dr. Brian BurtchDr. Brian Burtch

I am a Professor in the School of Criminology and an associate member in SFU's Department of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies (GSWS).  My key interests are law in society, gender and the state, law and human reproduction, critical criminology, and efforts to support non-traditional postsecondary students, especially mid-career, mature students.  I chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on Lifelong Learning at SFU and served as the BC/Yukon regional representative for the Writers' Union of Canada from 1999-2001.  I also teach with online technology, authoring online and distance-education courses such as Law and Human Reproduction (Crim 334), and support cohort-based education such as the Integrated Studies Program at SFU and the Criminology Honours program. I am a member of the BC Book Prizes Board. 

My publications include Trials of Labour: The Reemergence of Midwifery (1994), The Sociology of Law (1992, 2003), an edited book with Nick Larsen, Law in Society: Canadian Readings (1999, 2006, 2010), and a co-authored book with Rebecca Haskell, Get That Freak: Homophobia and Transphobia in High Schools (1010).  With a longstanding interest in social justice, dating back to my earlier work with Richard Ericson on suicide by Canadian prisoners and my continuing work on anti-racism and anti-homophobia, the opportunity to work within a restorative framework offers an important way of addressing the limited dichotomy of punishment versus leniency that has characterized much of criminal justice research and policy.  I became more interested in restorative approaches through work with colleagues when I served on the North Shore Family Court and Youth Justice Committee for three years in my community of North Vancouver. 


Dr. Robert M. Gordon

Dr. Robert M. GordonDr. Robert M. Gordon

Dr. Robert M. Gordon, Professor and Director, School of Criminology; Director, International Cyber-Crime Research Centre; Associate Member, Department of Gerontology; Member of the Management Committee, Centre for Forensic Research; Member of the Management Committee, Centre for Restorative Justice; Distinguished Fellow at the Canadian Centre for Elder Law, University of British Columbia; interested in the uses of restorative justice in cases of abuse and neglect involving seniors and in the politics of restorative justice.   




Rev. David Gustafson, MA, RCC

Rev. David Gustafson, MA, RCCRev. David Gustafson

Dave is first of all ‘rich’ in most of what matters to him: valued relationships and opportunity to make a contribution in areas of his life-long passions.  These include trauma recovery and healing, creating social structures that contribute to the making of a justpeace; assisting others who languish (trauma survivors, in the main) to discover their own gifts, to recover hope, to grow and to flourish.

Dave has been a member of the steering committee for the SFU Centre for Restorative Justice since the centre’s beginnings.  He is an Adjunct Professor in SFU’s School of Criminology where he taught for a number of years on peace and justice-making theory and restorative practices.

Dave is currently Co-Director of Fraser Region Community Justice Initiatives Association (CJI) in Langley, B.C.  As the founding director, Dave began the agency’s first program in 1982, a Victim Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP), based on Kitchener, Ontario and Elkhart, Indiana models.  CJI now specializes in training, program development, conferencing and victim offender mediation across the spectrum from minor schools conflicts to the most serious offences in the Canadian criminal code. The primary focus of Dave’s work at CJI is on facilitating ‘therapeutic dialogue’ in federal prisons between victims and offenders in cases involving crimes of severe violence under the auspices of CJI’s Victim Offender Mediation Program (VOMP).

For a number of years, Dave has been involved in related research through the Leuven Institute for Criminology (LINC) at KUL in Leuven, Belgium.  His research interests are in trauma and recovery, the related neurology and the impacts for both trauma survivors and the prisoners responsible for offending against them as each encounters the ‘other’ through VOMP’s processes; impacts and outcomes often described as “transformative” by the participants. 

Dave also maintains a part-time private clinical practice, mainly seeing clients referred by area professionals for specific work related to trauma.   In what time remains, Dave is a sailor and a fervent ‘wannabe’ in areas as disparate as: social justice and justice reform (especially in Latin America), fine-woodworking, classical music, blues guitar, and desire to test his celestial navigation skills somewhere under the Southern Cross. He hopes never to stop dreaming about and exploring what lies just “beyond”.


Dr. Margaret Jackson

Dr. Margaret JacksonDr. Margaret Jackson

I am currently a Professor Emerita in the School of Criminology, having served in the School of Criminology as a Full Professor and as the School’s Director for two separate terms, Director of FREDA, an SFU centre undertaking research on violence against women and children, and Director or co-Director of the Institute for Studies in Criminal Justice Policy.  My areas of research and teaching interest are:  violence against women and children, cyberbullying, problem-solving courts, and justice policy analysis.  My main area of research and teaching focus has been upon justice policy analysis.  I have received academic recognition for both my research productivity and performance as well as for my teaching. These involvements resulted in my serving as a co-investigator/principal investigator for SSHRC, Status of Women, Heritage Canada, Metropolis-RIIM, and NCPC grants, as well as for two CIHR grants.

In research related to restorative justice interests, I have been involved in both social justice and citizenship programming through the SFU Department of the Humanities Department and with restorative justice initiatives through the Restorative Justice Centre at SFU. In the latter regard, my interest in problem-solving courts, specifically the Downtown Community Court in Vancouver, has clear links to a restorative justice model of conflict resolution that involves the community .


Neil Madu

Neil Madu is a well known guide to self-discovery with the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University where he teaches Ethics and Helping Skills.  Neil work involves direct discovery of our true nature, learning to express our undivided wholeness and the immediacy of pure being where people come to love and cherish who they are.  He has a wide range of interests which include Zen, Buddhism, Hospice and Palliative Care, Amnesty International, Mental Health, Ancient Wisdom, Meditations, Music and Poetry.  Neil is a compelling force in the teaching arena.  His gentle intelligence and heartfelt compassion offer a clear perspective on the very human situations of daily life.  He has a passion for literature, life and the pursuit of world peace.

Email  nmadu@sfu.ca

 

Joao Salm, PhD, MPA, BL

Joao Salm, PhD, MPA, BLJoao Salm

Joao Salm completed a PhD in justice studies through the School of Justice and Social Inquiry at Arizona State University. He pursued research on restorative justice principles and practices in court settings and in community-indigenous settings.

Prior to this, Joao completed a master’s degree in public administration and a bachelor’s degree in law. Currently, he manages community service programs at the Mediation and Restorative Justice Centre in the city of Edmonton. He teaches Criminology at the University of Alberta. He is also an instructor at Simon Fraser University, teaching in SFU Continuing Studies' online Certificate in Restorative Justice.
Additionally, Joao was part of the International Development Committee for the Association for Conflict Resolution and named a young scholar with the Organization of the American States in the Inter-American Program on Education for Democratic Values and Practices.

"I understand restorative justice and its practices as a possibility of a democratic experience to achieve justice by direct participation, dialogue and engagement.I am interested in the context which restorative justice takes place.  Specifically, how formal and community based organizations implement restorative justice principles. I am also interested in the Intersection  of restorative justice, political education, freedom and participation."  - Joao Salm


Barry Stuart

Barry StuartBarry Stuart

For the past 42 years, Barry's work has focused on developing constructive ways to engage the energy in conflict to generate sustainable outcomes and effective relationships. Work that involved addressing conflict as a Judge, trainer, mediator, negotiator, professor, and consultant in creating safe places for people to engage in the difficult dialogues needed to move through seemingly intractable differences. Judge Stuart has been involved at community level in several countries to develop community based processes as an integral part of enhancing community wellbeing and safety. He has pioneered development of Peacemaking Circles now used in many different countries for criminal, child protection, civil, and a wide range of corporate and multi-party public matters.

Judge Stuart has served on the executive of several national organizations addressing a wide spectrum of public issues. He has participated in many volunteer organizations at all levels, local, national and international as Director and in some cases founder: Aboriginal Mothers Centre, Coastal Opportunities, Conflict Network Canada, Village Development Task Force, Village Peace Hut, and others. In addition to all of this, Barry has taught at several Universities, and led numerous courses on mediation, Participant Driven Collaboration and a wide range of topics related to governance. Judge Stuart has worked in organizations and multiparty process confronting complex issues in many different settings all over the world and served on the executive of several national organizations addressing a wide spectrum of public issues.

Currently a partner in CSE whose focus is building new collaborative processes for responding to multi party public issues, developing laws and processes for First Nation Self Governance and Barry continues to work on justice and community issues.

Adjunct Professors

Dr. Kay Pranis

Dr. Kay PranisDr. Kay Pranis

Kay Pranis teaches and writes about the dialog process known as 'peacemaking circles.'  Kay learned about peacemaking circles in her work in restorative justice in the mid-90s.  Since that initial exposure to the use of peacemaking circles in the justice system Kay has been involved in developing the use of peacemaking circles in schools, social services, churches, families, museums, universities, municipal planning and workplaces.

Kay has authored or co-authored several books about circles:  Peacemaking Circles - From Crime to Community;  The Little Book of Circle Processes – A New/Old Approach to Peacemaking;  Doing Democracy with Circles – Engaging Communities in Public Planning;  Heart of Hope – A Guide for Using Peacemaking Circles to Develop Emotional Literacy, Promote Healing & Build Healthy Relationships.   

Kay works primarily as an independent trainer in the peacemaking circle process.  She is also an adjunct professor at Simon Fraser University, Eastern Mennonite University and Southwest Minnesota State University.

Kay has a particular interest in the use of circles to support social justice efforts addressing racial, economic, class and gender inequities.  That interest includes the use of peacemaking circles to understand and respond to historical harms to groups of people.  The peacemaking circle process has been a source of energy, inspiration and continuous learning for Kay for the past 15 years.  

Dr. Paul McCold

Paul McCold is adjunct professor at the Centre for Restorative Justice at the School of Criminology of Simon Fraser University and the Criminal Justice Department of St. Martin's University in Lacey, WA.

He was a founding professor of restorative practices at the Graduate School of the International Institute for Restorative Practices (IIRP) in Bethlehem Pennsylvania and he was IIRP's Director of Research for a decade. Prior to that, he was associate professor at Temple University and Old Dominion University. Paul received his Ph.D. in criminal justice at the University of Albany and was a research scientist with New York State for ten years.

He represented the Friends World Committee on Consultation (Quakers) at the Alliance of NGOs on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice since 1995 and was recently chair of the Alliance. As chair of the Working Party on Restorative Justice, he helped organize ancillary sessions on restorative justice at the 2000 and 2005 United Nations Congresses on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.

He published Restorative Justice: An Annotated Bibliography and several articles for the Working Party.

He was a member of the expert group reviewing the Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes by the Criminal Justice Reform Unit of the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime in Vienna.

Paul is an original member of the International Network for Research on Restorative Justice of Belgium and is a signatory of the Declaration of Leuven, 1997. He served as a technical consultant to the COST Action 21 Restorative Justice Developments in Europe and as a grant reviewer on restorative justice projects for the European Science Foundation, the Community-University Research Alliances in Canada and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong. He represented the IIRP as an institutional member of the European Forum on Restorative Justice and has trained restorative conferencing facilitators and trainers in Australia, Canada, Hungary, the Netherlands, Sweden, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

He is currently living in Olympia Washington.

 

Rev. David Gustafson

For the past 42 years, Barry's work has focused on developing constructive ways to engage the energy in conflict to generate sustainable outcomes and effective relationships. Work that involved addressing conflict as a Judge, trainer, mediator, negotiator, professor, and consultant in creating safe places for people to engage in the difficult dialogues needed to move through seemingly intractable differences. Judge Stuart has been involved at community level in several countries to develop community based processes as an integral part of enhancing community wellbeing and safety. He has pioneered development of Peacemaking Circles now used in many different countries for criminal, child protection, civil, and a wide range of corporate and multi-party public matters.

Judge Stuart has served on the executive of several national organizations addressing a wide spectrum of public issues. He has participated in many volunteer organizations at all levels, local, national and international as Director and in some cases founder: Aboriginal Mothers Centre, Coastal Opportunities, Conflict Network Canada, Village Development Task Force, Village Peace Hut, and others. In addition to all of this, Barry has taught at several Universities, and led numerous courses on mediation, Participant Driven Collaboration and a wide range of topics related to governance. Judge Stuart has worked in organizations and multiparty process confronting complex issues in many different settings all over the world and served on the executive of several national organizations addressing a wide spectrum of public issues.

Currently a partner in CSE whose focus is building new collaborative processes for responding to multi party public issues, developing laws and processes for First Nation Self Governance and Barry continues to work on justice and community issues.

Susan Sharpe, Ph.D.

Susan SharpeSusan Sharpe

Susan Sharpe, Ph.D., is advisor on Restorative Justice at the University of Notre Dame, in an appointment split between the Notre Dame Law School and the Center for Social Concerns. Actively involved in restorative justice since 1994, she has worked with government and nonprofit agencies in Canada, the United States, and South Africa on projects related to restorative justice. Her publications include academic articles and book chapters as well as practical guides to best practice. A former board member of the international Victim Offender Mediation Association (VOMA), she also isaAdjunct professor in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University.

Email: ssharpe1@nd.edu

Phone: 574-631-3557
Center for Social Concerns
164 Geddes Hall
Notre Dame, IN 46556

Barry Stuart

For the past 42 years, Barry's work has focused on developing constructive ways to engage the energy in conflict to generate sustainable outcomes and effective relationships. Work that involved addressing conflict as a Judge, trainer, mediator, negotiator, professor, and consultant in creating safe places for people to engage in the difficult dialogues needed to move through seemingly intractable differences. Judge Stuart has been involved at community level in several countries to develop community based processes as an integral part of enhancing community wellbeing and safety. He has pioneered development of Peacemaking Circles now used in many different countries for criminal, child protection, civil, and a wide range of corporate and multi-party public matters.

Judge Stuart has served on the executive of several national organizations addressing a wide spectrum of public issues. He has participated in many volunteer organizations at all levels, local, national and international as Director and in some cases founder: Aboriginal Mothers Centre, Coastal Opportunities, Conflict Network Canada, Village Development Task Force, Village Peace Hut, and others. In addition to all of this, Barry has taught at several Universities, and led numerous courses on mediation, Participant Driven Collaboration and a wide range of topics related to governance. Judge Stuart has worked in organizations and multiparty process confronting complex issues in many different settings all over the world and served on the executive of several national organizations addressing a wide spectrum of public issues.

Currently a partner in CSE whose focus is building new collaborative processes for responding to multi party public issues, developing laws and processes for First Nation Self Governance and Barry continues to work on justice and community issues.

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